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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another interesting meld of science fiction and horror
Despite what critics have said about Saturn 3, I think it is a very good science fiction film. Another good meshing of science fiction and gothic horror. It may seem like a futuristic version of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, however, it is still a very good film. One of the many best that ITC Entertainment has ever produced. It goes to show you that the British are one of...
Published on October 18, 2000 by Christopher Dalton

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I don't understand...
Saturn 3, while certainly not the best of films, does not deserve all of the bashing it gets. This film is sort of a "Fatal Attraction" meets the "Terminator" even though Saturn 3 was released years prior.
I really enjoyed this film. The "atmosphere" of the movie was very convincing and almost literally transports the viewer to the third moon of Saturn.
Yes, the...
Published on February 2, 2007 by R. Legendre


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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another interesting meld of science fiction and horror, October 18, 2000
By 
Christopher Dalton (Louisville, Kentucky) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Saturn 3 (DVD)
Despite what critics have said about Saturn 3, I think it is a very good science fiction film. Another good meshing of science fiction and gothic horror. It may seem like a futuristic version of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, however, it is still a very good film. One of the many best that ITC Entertainment has ever produced. It goes to show you that the British are one of the best film industries in the world.
This was the first R-rated film I ever saw, and I was amazed at how the film looked as well as the storyline, and special effects. Most of all, the acting, costumes, sets, the works. The film tells the story about a couple who work on one of Saturn's moons, developing a new hydroponics system for a starving Earth. The old man(played wonderfully by Kirk Douglas)is someone who has rejected Earth and its way of life. The young woman(played really well by Farrah Fawcett)is someone who was born on a colony and has never seen or been to Earth. Along comes a terrorist(played by the ever great Harvey Keitel), who has originally murdered the original pilot who has come to Saturn 3, to help the two scientists get back on schedule. As part of that help, he builds a robot, the first in its series, named Hector. Unfortunately, due to the pilot's instability, the robot becomes a threat and starts a rampage, which forces the two scientists to sacrifice everything they have in order to survive and overcome the odds. Plus the old man making the ultimate sacrifice.
It may be a bit like Ridley Scott's masterpiece, ALIEN, however, Saturn 3 is still a very good and entertaining film. Not only with a wonderful soundtrack by The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, but with its solid storyline and plot. If you enjoy science fiction, be sure to check this film out. It's certainly better than Star Trek and its spinoffs, let alone the film Supernova. It even has a nude scene with Farrah Fawcett that's pretty good too.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Adam and Evil, June 3, 2002
By 
This review is from: Saturn 3 (DVD)
John Barry and Stanley Donen's misunderstood sci-fi brainchild was panned on initial release, but happily is coming under re-evaluation in a later age.
Kirk Douglas and Farrah Fawcett run a hydroponics lab on Saturn's third moon, Titan, which helps feed an overcrowded and progressively more sociopathic Earth. Douglas and Fawcett are "paired," though not actually married (or at least it is never understood that they are), she being an innocent naif who has never seen Earth and lived virtually her entire life with him, and he a disillusioned older man who never desires to see Earth again - though he encourages her to visit their home planet one day, if for no other reason than to further Fawcett's natural development.
Earth has decided that Douglas will soon be "obsolete," and sends captain Harvey Keitel to assemble a robot to eventually run Saturn 3. Keitel, however, is actually an impostor - he was washed out of the robot programming division because he was "potentially unstable," and, proving the point, murdered the man given the assignment in order to take his place. The reason is never stated, but the implication is strongly present - given his immediate fascination with Fawcett - that he wanted the assignment in order to be closer to her.
The robot - "Adam" - has a human brain, directly programmed by Keitel. Since Keitel is a homicidal psychopath...well, you get the picture. It isn't long before Saturn 3 becomes a battleground for supremacy with a mad metal titan.
This is really a great movie, if flawed. The ending is too abrupt. Douglas sometimes seems uncomfortable in his role, or acts as if he is in a different movie than Keitel and Fawcett. The special effects are uneven, though generally pretty impressive.
But the script is solid and the suspense never lets up. The action is pretty gripping, shooting out of a gun from the first scene, when Keitel coldly murders the astronaut whose place he is taking by flushing him out into space. The production is gorgeous, and unified. The sets are beautiful, and incredibly colorful. The matte shots for space and Saturn hearken back to 1950's pulp magazine covers. The costuming is futuristic, but functional. And the robot, Adam, is a nightmare out of Leonardo da Vinci's sketchbooks of human anatomy. The terrific music score, by Elmer Bernstein, is mechanistically haunting.
A great movie it isn't, but it is very good. There is a nice undercurrent of human feeling to this film, which is emphasized by the contrast of the warm and loving relationship between Douglas and Fawcett with the predatory intrusion of the coldly sociopathic Keitel.
This is wonderful sci-fi pulp, and if that's what you're in the mood for, you won't be disappointed.
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40 of 45 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An early Terminator, February 23, 2002
By 
sbissell3 (Denver, CO USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Saturn 3 (DVD)
This is probably one of the most neglected ScFi flicks ever made. Despite a stellar cast, it was largely ignored when it was released in 1980. What interests me now is that the film seems to have influenced James Cameron on both Terminator and Aliens. In fact several scenes are very similar. The destruction of the Psychotic robot Hector and the scene where the soldier from the future blows up the Terminator are very similar. In Saturn 3 the robot chases the two main characters around trying to catch them through the floor grate. That seems very similar to several scenes in Aliens. I've never seen any comment by Cameron that this film influenced him, but it seems hard to miss.
Even if you are not interested in the connection to Terminator or Aliens, this is worth getting. The reproduction to this DVD is excellent. The only thing that keeps me from giving it 5 stars is that it is a bit slow at times and, other than Harvey Keitel, the acting is a bit. . .well, not up to either the standards of Kirk Douglas or Farrah Fawcett. I'm not being snide either, I consider both excellent actors.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Horny Robot-- Oh, No!, September 3, 2000
By 
This review is from: Saturn 3 (DVD)
Three characters are plenty to fill out this stylish Sci-Fi chestnut, wherein Kirk Douglas and Farrah Fawcett are lone scientists stationed on a remote planet as they try to develop a sustainable new food source for Earth folks who are starvin'. Their idyllic little existence is shattered when Harvey Keitel stops by with his big, badass robot-in-a-box, Hector, in tow. Between salivating over Farrah and plotting how to get into her pants, Harvey assembles Hector, and the two share minds for a while, effectively indoctrinating Hector to the wild woolly world of Harvey's bad manners, general evil, and a supreme desire to knock boots with Farrah.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fun, freaky early 80's sci-fi horror flick finally on dvd (and blu ray) in the U.S.!, December 5, 2013
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This review is from: Saturn 3 [Blu-ray/DVD Combo] (Blu-ray)
After making do with a region 2 dvd (cropped image; no extras), I was surprised and relieved to see Saturn 3 finally getting a release 33 years after its theatrical run. Shout! Factory has come out with what is certainly the best release of Saturn 3 ever. This set includes two discs- one blu ray, one dvd. The blu ray image is excellent and sharp (Farrah and Hector look great; beautiful, eerie quasi-futuristic corridors of the moonbase), in widescreen with excellent sound, nicely balancing Hector's creepy sounds and Elmer Bernstein's odd, electronic/symphonic score. The blu ray extras are generous, including an interview with the English actor who dubbed Harvey Kietel's part in the film, an extended `blue dreamers' scene, and added scenes/bits from the network televised version of the film (though they're not of high quality). The commentary, though from fans of the film (Greg Moss of the Saturn 4 Fan Page; film critic David Bradley) as opposed to cast/crew directly involved with the film production, is informative (they certainly did their homework) and answers some questions I had about this troubled production (which Kirk Douglas made no mention of in his autobiography). There's also an interview with Colin Chilvers (who should have been on the commentary) concerning special effects and other matters(great robotic FX, admittedly so-so spaceship sequences; cast tensions).

Granted, some of the effects and dialogue may make more contemporary/CGI-savvy audiences cringe and scoff, but this may be a cult film for certain generations who watched it (or wanted to) back in 1980. Nothing seems to be missing here (compared to my old region 2 disc). All those hokey moments- three characters arguing over 'shared sex' ideas from terrible old Earth, spaceships flying through meteor-showered rings of Saturn (picture 'bread balls underwater'), all kinds of creepy and nasty things occur with the big, clumsy, tube-tied android Hector at its center, are on display, looking better than ever. Kirk Douglas is great as usual, Farrah is lovely but seemingly ditzy, and Harvey Keitel is creepy but not quite himself due to a robotic performance and dubbing. But...DO get hold of this sadly, nearly-forgotten semi-sexy sci-fi/horror flick and appreciate something you may have been too young to see at the time (as I had been). Loosen up and enjoy it- don't take it seriously!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding blu ray!, December 10, 2013
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This review is from: Saturn 3 [Blu-ray/DVD Combo] (Blu-ray)
I have to admit that this movie has always been a guilty pleasure of mine. Its just so bad that its good! Plus I remember it being on TV a lot when I was a kid and I always loved watching it. Even though the acting is horrible, the special effects are laughable at times and it is cheesy...I always thought the set design of the habitat on Saturn 3 was awesome. You can really tell they built a huge sound stage to film the indoor scenes in.

Regarding the image quality of the blu ray itself, I can honestly say I was totally blown away! I had read some glowing reviews of this blu ray before it was released and they were right...the movie looks fantastic. I have no idea how this low budget, forgotten B-movie was adapted to look so stunning in HD to be honest (while big money makers like Top Gun and Predator look really bad on blu ray). I mean its almost demo quality...its that good. It was almost like seeing it again for the first time.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I don't understand..., February 2, 2007
By 
R. Legendre (New Orleans, LA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Saturn 3 (DVD)
Saturn 3, while certainly not the best of films, does not deserve all of the bashing it gets. This film is sort of a "Fatal Attraction" meets the "Terminator" even though Saturn 3 was released years prior.
I really enjoyed this film. The "atmosphere" of the movie was very convincing and almost literally transports the viewer to the third moon of Saturn.
Yes, the movie has it's flaws. Farrah Fawcett is a terrible actress. She always was. But, then again, this '70s icon was never chosen for roles because of her acting ability, which, unfortunately, seems to be so commonplace in Hollywood.
Harvey Keitel, one of my favorite actors, does seem to give a very wooden performance, but that is probably due to the fact that the director did not like his Brooklyn accent and had all of his lines dubbed in by a British actor. Also, I think his character was meant to be dead-pan and wooden to reflect the current socialogical aspects of Earth's society (apparently, Earth is an overcrowded and socially bankrupt planet, much like it is today!).
The special effects are subpar when compared to similar sci-fi flicks of that time, but that is part of its charm. The effects, while slightly substandard, are still very eye-catching.
The story itself if very original. The idea of a robot becoming sexually obsessed with a woman just like his master and unable to fulfill his unnatural desires is executed in a logical and suspenseful way. The set design and costumes are also well done. The robot Hector, though, does seem to be designed rather oddly. That is probably due to the fact that a suit had to be built that could house a rather large-framed actor inside of it.
All in all, Saturn 3 is worth a look. Fans of sci-fi and thrillers should find this to be an excellent escape. I, for one, am glad to see that this movie is still around and available for purchase.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Kirk and Farrah, together at last ( with a robot and Harvey Keitel), March 4, 2013
By 
daedrya (Minneapolis MN) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saturn 3 (Amazon Instant Video)
Probably one of the more under rated sci-fi movies, this one has remained in my memory for years. Thank you Amazon for giving me the chance to see it again. Kirk is muscular,albeit aging. Farrah is gorgeous and Harvey is young. Kind of a simple plot, Harvey comes to the isolated space station where Kirk and Farrah have established a sort of Eden with their little dog. Harvey and the robot he's transporting there, arrive like the proverbial serpent altho with a lustful twist for the lovely Farrah. As can be imagined, things don't end well. While it's no Blade Runner, another movie that was initially panned,this movie deserves more attention than it received at it's debut.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Scream Factory Takes Home Viewers to "Saturn 3", November 26, 2013
By 
This review is from: Saturn 3 [Blu-ray/DVD Combo] (Blu-ray)
Scream Factory brings 1980's sci-fi schlock-fest "Saturn 3" to Blu-ray for the first time. From its first shot of the underside of a space cruiser flying into the frame towards a planet, you feel the influences of "Alien," "Star Wars," and every other genre film of its type put out in the 1970s. The only difference is in the lower budget the studio had to spend on models, props, and other special effects.

Scientist Adam (Kirk Douglas) and his colleague/lover Alex are stationed on an experimental hydroponics research station on one of the moons of Saturn. Their peaceful existence is interrupted by the arrival of Captain Benson (Harvey Keitel). He's been sent to assemble a robot named Hector who will likely replace Adam in the hopes of making the station run more efficiently. It slowly becomes obvious the robot has a mind of its own. It will stop at nothing to take over the station and liberate itself from the control of any humans.

The high-definition audio and video transfers for "Saturn 3" help and hinder it in different ways. The picture is clean but doesn't lose its 1980's "real film" feel. However, the clarity doesn't necessarily help when it brings the budgetary limitations further into the light in regards to the outer space sequences and other visual effects. The audio is presented in 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio. There are all sorts of bizarre sounds and gadgets to take in, not to mention Elmer Bernstein's eclectic musical score.

"Saturn 3" is rated R for violence, language, adult situations, drug use, and brief nudity. The brief nudity is basically a flash of Farah Fawcett's breasts and the butt of Kirk Douglas. Both are unnecessary and add nothing to the story. Harvey Keitel and Hector both lust over the scantily-clad Fawcett. Keitel tells her that on Earth, everyone is promiscuous in the future. They've come to all just enjoy each other sexually with no inhibitions.

Scream Factory puts together an impressive batch of special features for "Saturn 3." Audio commentary is provided by Greg Moss of the "Saturn 3" Fan Page and film critic David Bradley. There are interviews and featurettes which include Special Effects Artist Colin Chilvers and actor Roy Dotrice, who overdubbed the voice for Harvey Keitel's character. Deleted scenes and a theatrical trailer round out the bonus material.

"Saturn 3" is a must-have for sci-fi fans that collect any and every movie made within the genre. To common everyday movie audiences, it'll come across as just another misstep for any of the actors and filmmakers involved. Cult classic enthusiasts will understand it for what it is. It's an overlooked and slightly damaged gemstone worthy of its place in their home entertainment library next to "Meteor," "Outland," "Lifeforce" and other forgotten treasures of the era.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars dated sci-fi worth a look, December 29, 2003
This review is from: Saturn 3 [VHS] (VHS Tape)
This is a bit of a misunderstood sci-fi flick ' not flawless, but worth a second look.
In a floating space station near Saturn, we meet Harvey Keitel's character, Benson, or 'The Captain'. Or is he really somebody else? In the first few minutes, he murders a pilot preparing to transport special cargo for a remote colony on Saturn's third moon. Taking the dead pilot's place "Benson" braves the rings of Saturn and arrives on Saturn 3, where Major Adam (Kirk Douglas) and the fetching Alex (Farrah Fawcett) are developing hydroponics-grown food for a struggling Earth. It's not just work for Adam and Alex, and Benson's arrival disrupts the family unit that the two have made for each other. Adam came to space to escape Earth (which we're supposed to assume is made unpleasant perhaps by pollution, war, over-population or some other contemporary problem unchecked in his distant future). Alex has never known Earth, which only highlights the apparent generation gap between her and Adam. Benson begins desiring Alex well before he actually gets around to his purported mission, and he figures that Adam's age gives him the edge (monogamy is frowned upon back on Earth, he tells her). It turns out that Benson has come to construct a robot to replace the team's now obsolescent half - Adam, and into that job, he throws himself full steam. Benson is so obsessed to complete the menacing robot which will replace Adam that you begin to wonder which of the trwo obsessions really rules his dark soul: Alex or the robot. When completed, the vaguely humanoid machine stands about 8 feet high, moves convincingly and menacingly robot-like and is topped with an incongruous thing that looks like a desk lamp. Called Hector, the robot's CPU is a large clear can containing what looks like human brain matter. Not talkative at the outset, the machine (a model ominously called a 'demigod') picks up fast when linked into Keitel's brain through a remote sensor Keitel implants into the base of his own spine (a striking precursor to the decades-newer "Matrix"). Unfortunately, the neural link also gets the 'bot past the firewall of Benson's soul, and we learn through the robot a dark thing or two about Benson - notably that he failed a probably important course, likely one meant to protect a burgeoning artificial intelligence from the mind of a natural-born psychotic. Unsurprisingly, the machine not only becomes psychotic as well, but decides that Benson is an obstacle to be replaced much as Benson had planned for Adam. Soon, Adam and Alex are on the run from Hector, learning to quickly duck in and out of hydraulic doors and weave through cramped ventilator shafts.
This was a pretty slim flick which gets more mileage than it should out of Farrah Fawcett. Her character is vulnerable and compulsively dependent throughout the movie, never displaying the resourcefulness that Sigourney Weaver had established for a new generation of sci-fi heroines in 'Alien' (which came out the year before). Alex has to be the last female character to faint out of fear in a sci-fi film. We never get an insight into Keitel's character either - obsessed with both Hector and Fawcett. The two can't both be paramount in his mind. You get the idea that to Benson, the robot is just a means to get Alex; but there are scenes when Keitel tries to get into the robot's head, making it a more substantial part of his own psyche. It's incredible to think that Martin Amis had anything to do with this story which, among other things, is strikingly unsurprising. (Case in point: when first demonstrated, Hector crushes a can Benson had ordered the robot to give Adam. There isn't a person on the planet who couldn't guess Kirk Douglas's response: 'I'm glad you didn't tell him to shake my hand.')
On the plus side, the visuals are nice. The sets were obviously influenced by Alien at the time, but today look more like a cross between the drab utilitarian interiors of that film and the older way-out futurism of visionary artist Chesley Bonestell (the space station, ships and star-scapes recall the famous artist's vision) and the thin story will keep you watching - just not that much. But above all, the real attraction is Harvey Keitel - who speaks in a very precise accent. It's Keitel as you've never seen (with a cool euro-looking ponytail) or heard (his voice was dubbed) him before. Even if Keitel's character is too vague to drive the story, he's still fun to watch (and hear). You know that the robot will go for him first, and his loss is what kills this film as much as his presence gives it a life that (like the robot) it doesn't really deserve.
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Saturn 3 [Blu-ray/DVD Combo]
Saturn 3 [Blu-ray/DVD Combo] by Stanley Donen (Blu-ray - 2013)
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