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Savage Anxieties: The Invention of Western Civilization Hardcover – August 21, 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Trade (August 21, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230338763
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230338760
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 0.9 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,619 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Armed with guns, horses, and machines, European settlers relentlessly mowed down, pushed aside, and in some cases enslaved  peaceful natives they found living in the new worlds they were overrunning.  Reaching back to antiquity, they resurrected myths about one-eyed giants and other monsters to rationalize the harsh treatment they were visiting on Indians and Mexicans.  Later, they would deploy very similar rhetorical strategies to justify extermination and enslavement in other parts of the world.  The suspicion grows that Western agents are the savages and the peace-loving natives the superior race.  Savage Anxieties explains how, like bad money driving out good, a savage society will win every time.”--Richard Delgado, professor, Seattle University School of Law and author of Critical Race Theory 

About the Author

Robert A. Williams, Jr. is a member of the Lumbee Indian Tribe as well as the professor of law and director of the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program at the University of Arizona. He is the author of the classic work on Indian rights under US law, The American Indian in Western Legal Thought, which won the Gustavus Meyer human rights award recently. The recipient of awards from the MacArthur, Ford, and Soros foundations, Williams is also well known for his work defending tribal groups before the United Nations and the Supreme Court.

More About the Author

Robert A. Williams, Jr. is the E. Thomas Sullivan Professor of Law and American Indian Studies and Faculty Co-Chair of the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy (IPLP) Program at the University of Arizona Rogers College of Law in Tucson. An enrolled member of the Lumbee Indian Tribe of North Carolina, Professor Williams received his B.A. from Loyola College (1977) and his J.D. from Harvard Law School (1980). He was named the first Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School (2003-2004), having previously served there as Bennet Boskey Distinguished Visiting Lecturer of Law. He is the author of The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest (1990), which received the Gustavus Meyers Human Rights Center Award as one of the outstanding books published in 1990 on the subject of prejudice in the United States. He has also written Linking Arms Together: American Indian Treaty Visions of Law and Peace, 1600-1800 (1997) and Like a Loaded Weapon: The Rehnquist Court, Indian Rights and the Legal History of Racism in America (2005). He is co-author of Federal Indian Law: Cases and Materials (6th ed., with David Getches and Charles Wilkinson, 2011). His latest book, Savage Anxieties: The Invention of Western Civilization will be published by Palgrave Macmillan (Fall 2102). The 2006 recipient of the University of Arizona Henry and Phyllis Koffler Prize for Outstanding Accomplishments in Public Service, Professor Williams is the founding Director of the IPLP Program at the Rogers College of Law. He has received major grants and awards from the Soros Senior Justice Fellowship Program of the Open Society Institute, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the National Institute of Justice. He has represented tribal groups before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Peoples, and served as co-counsel for Floyd Hicks in the United States Supreme Court case, Nevada v. Hicks (2001 term). Professor Williams has served as Chief Justice for the Court of Appeals, Pascua Yaqui Indian Reservation, and as Justice for the Court of Appeals and trial judge pro tem for the Tohono O'odham Nation. Professor Williams was named one of 2011's "Heroes on the Hill" by Indian Country Today for his work on behalf of the Hul'qumi'num Treaty Group before the OAS Inter-American Human Rights Commission.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. W. Chambers on August 31, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Robert Williams is a major scholar, and this book will only enhance is already considerable reputation. This is one of those grand histories of European thought that begins with the ancient Greek invention of the idea of the savage, following the development of this concept right down to the present, where it is still being used "to justify violations of the most basic human rights". His analytical and carefully reasoned account is essential to understanding the modern perpetuation of stereotypes, especially in the Native American context.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By SK on March 8, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The best book I've read in a long time. Williams is absolutely brilliant in his analysis. He ripped apart history to make room for truth. Everyone should read this book in order to understand reality. I loved it!
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4 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Ricardo G. Huerta Nino on September 20, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I just ordered my copy and can't wait to read it. He truly is one of the most important scholars in the field. After you read this one, get his other work, especially Like a Loaded Weapon and The American Indian Western Legal Thought.
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