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Saving the Americas: The Dangerous Decline of Latin America and What The U.S. Must Do Hardcover – October 23, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Mondadori (October 23, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307391655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307391650
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,575,258 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
ANDRES OPPENHEIMER is the Latin American editor and foreign affairs columnist with The Miami Herald. His syndicated column, The Oppenheimer Report, appears twice a week in The Miami Herald and in more than 40 U.S. and Latin American newspapers, including La Nacion of Argentina and Reforma of Mexico. He is a regular political
analyst with CNN en Español, and a frequent guest at PBS' Jim Lehrer News Hour. He also hosts his own television talk show in Spanish on current events, Oppenheimer Presenta.

His previous positions at The Miami Herald included Mexico City bureau chief, foreign correspondent, and business writer. He previously worked for five years with The Associated Press in New York, and has contributed on a free-lance basis to The New York Times, The Washington Post, The New Republic, CBS News, and the BBC.

Oppenheimer is the co-winner of the 1987 Pulitzer Prize as a member of The Miami Herald team that uncovered the Iran-Contra scandal. He won the Inter-American Press Association Award twice (1989 and 1994); the 1997 award of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists; the 1993 Ortega y Gasset Award of Spain's daily El País; the 1998 Maria Moors Cabot Award of Columbia University; the 2001 King of Spain Award, given out by the Spanish news agency EFE and King Juan Carlos I of Spain; and an Overseas Press Club Award in 2002. The Ortega y Gasset and the King of Spain awards are the two most prestigious journalism awards in the Spanish-speaking world.

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, he studied law for four years at the University of Buenos Aires' Law School, and moved to the United States in 1976 with a fellowship from the World Press Institute. After a year at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, he obtained a Master's degree in Journalism from Columbia University in New York in
1978.

Oppenheimer was selected by the Forbes Media Guide as one of the “500 most important journalists” of the United States in 1993, and by Poder magazine as one of the “100 most powerful people” in Latin America in 2002.

For more information on Andres Oppenheimer: www.AndresOppenheimer.com

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 10 customer reviews
This book really opened my eyes.
Ester Benavides
This is the best book on Latin American affairs I have read in a long time.
Jorge Bobadilla
I first read this in Spanish and am now reading it in English.
Kenneth

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rogelio Garcia on November 2, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Easy to read and to understand, this timely book sums up the major issues currently faced by Latin America. Although the author makes it clear that the book is not written as essays, the chapters and sections read very much in that way. I usually do not like this type of structure; however, I take exception in this case. Mr. Oppenheimer's comfortable and non-academic tone makes this text accessible to this most important issue which most certainly should be understood by a wide audience.
My criticism of the book are few, but must be made clear to potential consumers. First, as mentioned before, this is a non-academic text. The author relies heavily on second-hand resources. His objective is to only to bring the major themes, ideas, and events and provide commentary on them, which he does well. So, if considering buying this book be aware that that this book is non-academic and not appropriate for research.
Secondly, I found the title of the book misleading. The book is a translation of an earlier work in Spanish which carries a different and more appropriate title: "Cuentos Chinos" (Chinese Stories). Oppenheimer spends a considerable amount of time contrasting Latin Americas struggle with its economies and democratization to Eastern Asia. Little mention is actually made about the U.S. with few exceptions. The author provides a "prologue" and an "afterword" to the North American edition, but that is it. Therefore, the subtitle that reads "...and what the U.S. Must Do" should more correctly read "...what the World Must Do" because it certainly isn't written specifically for the U.S.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jorge Bobadilla on January 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is the best book on Latin American affairs I have read in a long time. That's because instead of simply looking at the region, like most authors do, Oppenheimer compares Latin America's development with that of Asia, Eastern Europe and even Africa. I wish more authors would do this kind of comparative work, because it shows how Latin America, despite growing at 5 percent rates a year, is falling behind the rest of the developing world.And on top of it, it's a very entertaining book!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Agustin Guerrero on April 6, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
After reading Mr Oppenheimer's book I am really pesimistic about the future of my country that is rapidly becoming a backward country in a region that is missing its chances to develop. In April 26 a new general election will take place in Ecuador, the future of 13 million Ecuadoreans will be decided and what our polls are saying is that Rafael Correa will win by landslide his reelection. Correa is a carbon copy of Hugo Chavez and his Bolivarian Revolution, he has implemented everything Chavez did in Venezuela in the past years and as we are also cursed (or blessed) with crude oil production, Correa also benefited from oil's high prices in 2008 and misuded this record earnings in populists schemes to improve his popularity in the informal sector.

How do they do it ? they pay a bonification of less than 100 USD monthly to all people that qualify by being unemployed, poor, being a single mother, etc. these peolple become dependant in slaries of the government. Since most of these people are also informal traders they receive their income from their informal business and also a government subsidy so of course they love Correa.

While Chavez, Correa, Morales, the Kirchner couple, Ortega and now the El Salvadoran president (forgot his name) are moving along in their populist/socialist schemes favoring only their prospects of keeping power indefinitely other regions that only 15 years ago were having economical trouble (mainly India, China and eastern Europe) have geared themselves to becoming competitive and inviting investment.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Felipe Martinez on October 28, 2007
Format: Hardcover
If you really want to know how our current administration is messing things up with Latin America, just take a look at this book. It's amazing to me how little we take into account this part of the world when making foreign policy decisions, especially since they are our closest neighbors.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful book about what we can learn from China here in Latin America
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