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Saving Human Lives: Lessons in Management Ethics (Issues in Business Ethics) Hardcover – December 14, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-1402029059 ISBN-10: 1402029055 Edition: 2005th

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Saving Human Lives gives a step by step account of how management systems can be built that can prevent hitherto "unpreventable" disasters. Professor Allinson weaves convincing arguments from original linguistic, literary and ethical analyses and shows how these arguments apply to highly detailed and well documented case studies. Those of us in the field of business ethics are grateful for this creative combination of philosophical argumentation and the marshalling of widespread, empirical evidence that persuades us that, notwithstanding commonly held beliefs, most industrial crises are preventable through sound management structures and decision-making processes only when they are rooted in ethical values and beliefs on the part of top management."
(S. Prakash Sethi, President, International Center for Corporate Accountability, Inc., University Distinguished Professor, Baruch College, City University of New York)

From the Back Cover

This is a pioneering work. Recent disasters such as the tsunami disaster continue to demonstrate Professor Allinson’s thesis that valuing human lives is the core of ethical management. His unique comparison of the ideas of the power of Fate and High Technology, his penetrating analysis of the very concept of an "accident", demonstrate how concepts rule our lives. His wide-ranging investigation of court cases and government documents from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, and from places as diverse as the USA, UK and New Zealand provide ample supporting evidence for the universality and the power of explanation of his thesis. Saving Human Lives will have an impact beyond measurement on the field of management ethics.

Patrica Werhane, Peter and Adelline Professor of Business Ethics, Darden School, University of Virginia and The Wicklander Chair of Business Ethics and Director, Institute for Business and Professional Ethics, Depaul University, Founding Editor, Business Ethics Quarterly, Honorary President, Society for Business Ethics

Saving Human Lives gives a step by step account of how management systems can be built that can prevent hitherto "unpreventable" disasters. Professor Allinson weaves convincing arguments from original linguistic, literary and ethical analyses and shows how these arguments apply to highly detailed and well documented case studies. Those of us in the field of business ethics are grateful for this creative combination of philosophical argumentation and the marshalling of widespread, empirical evidence that persuades us that, notwithstanding commonly held beliefs, most industrial crises are preventable through sound management structures and decision-making processes only when they are rooted in ethical values and beliefs on the part of top management.’

S. Prakash Sethi, President, International Center for Corporate Accountability, Inc.,

University Distinguished Professor, Baruch College, City University of New York

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Product Details

  • Series: Issues in Business Ethics (Book 21)
  • Hardcover: 354 pages
  • Publisher: Springer; 2005 edition (December 14, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1402029055
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402029059
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,181,347 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
This book is a highpoint of western civilization, but it did not grow full-sprung out of the mind of Zeus (Allinson) as the reader versed with Dr. Allinson's other books know that his first book on Management Ethics, called Global Disasters, published many years ago set the stage for this, greater and more fundamental work. Dr. Allinson's main tenet is that ethical management is, fundamentally, a pro-active communications system, such that no problem is swept under the rug, everyone knows their duties and responsibilities, and management must "own a sense of responsibility" for whatever disasters it encounters. I met Dr. Allinson in 1974 when he was teaching at WV State College, and ended up taking two years of his philosophy courses, which covered eastern and western thought, ethics, aesthetics, philosophy of social improvements, and contemporary political philosophy. I know, for example, that Dr. Allinson does not believe in "tragedies" and takes issue with the word. It took me some time to delve into his thoughts, but it hit me one day, that in a time which does not exist anymore, thousands of years ago, Man thought that the Fates determined his Destiny, how long he lived, and the ancient Greeks used to say that "Character is Fate." Dr. Allinson became my first mentor. His first mentor was Dr. James A. Diefenbeck (1917-2005) (Harvard PhD, History of Philosophy). Dr. Diefenbeck said, "Character is the Ash of Personality." Interestingly enough, "per-sonality" comes from the Latin "per sona" or through sound. And it is a man's voice that points to his greatness, his honesty, his depth and his wisdom. So that there is a tie-in between Voice and Communication and Allinson argues in his Global Disasters book that ethical management has "open lines of communication".Read more ›
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