Saving Mr. Banks 2013 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(2,367) IMDb 7.6/10
Available in HD
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Discover the surprising backstory behind the making of Mary Poppins.

Starring:
Emma Thompson, Tom Hanks
Runtime:
2 hours 6 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Saving Mr. Banks

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Music, Comedy
Director John Lee Hancock
Starring Emma Thompson, Tom Hanks
Supporting actors Annie Rose Buckley, Colin Farrell, Ruth Wilson, Paul Giamatti, Bradley Whitford, B.J. Novak, Jason Schwartzman, Lily Bigham, Kathy Baker, Melanie Paxson, Andy McPhee, Rachel Griffiths, Ronan Vibert, Jerry Hauck, Laura Waddell, Fuschia Sumner, David Ross Paterson, Michelle Arthur
Studio Walt Disney Pictures
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Excellent acting,great story, and very entertaining.
James Truini
Emma Thompson gives an incredible performance as a very complex character who unfolds just as her story develops into an iconic film.
Melinda Dill
This is the story of P. L. Travers, author of Mary Poppins, and her early family life that inspired Mary Poppins.
allen scott

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
As always, no spoilers whatsoever in this review because that's just plain inconsiderate.

Saving Mr. Banks is a dual narrative portrait of the author of Mary Poppins and the creative team at Walt Disney that worked to bring it to the big screen. In one thread (1961) we have the curmudgeonly author behaving like a stark raving... well, curmudgeon as she tries to exert control over the creative process. In the other thread (1906, Australia) we unwind the story of her grim childhood that makes her a curmudgeon in the first place.

This movie has a lot of things to say not the least of which is to cast an entirely different light that beloved American classic of childhood. Mary Poppins ain't quite what you think it's about as a kid (but then what good movie IS what you think it's about when you're a kid). It's also a powerful demonstration of how our childhood influences us as adults sometimes in ways that we don't quite grasp until we look back on them from a great distance.

It's also interesting to see behind the curtain of the creative process. Avoiding spoilers, the author's primary objection is that Mary Poppins and the Banks family have become, in truth, her family over the years and sharing that vision and letting someone else have a piece of them is frightfully difficult. It does make a person wonder if all authors have this same struggle when crossing mediums.

Lastly, I'm a sucker for sentiment but this movie had the audience blowing its nose and audibly sniffing for a good hour. It's an incredibly intimate portrait. However, the kids won't think much of it and the group in the theatre with me was 50+ for the most part. All that said, highly recommended for anyone with a sentimental streak. Best movie I've seen in a month or more.
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155 of 167 people found the following review helpful By Whitt Patrick Pond TOP 1000 REVIEWER on December 20, 2013
Format: DVD
Saving Mr. Banks is the story of how Walt Disney came to make what is now regarded as his masterpiece: the much seen and much loved Mary Poppins, which was based on the series of very popular childrens books by P.L. Travers. Or rather, this _a_ version of the story. A somewhat sanitized and highly romanticized version. The real story unfolded rather differently. But that said, Saving Mr. Banks is at its heart, after all, a story and not a documentary, and in that context it's a highly enjoyable story.

Directed by John Lee Hancock (The Blind Side, The Rookie) from a screenplay by Kelly Marcel (Terra Nova) and Sue Smith, (The Road from Coorain), Saving Mr. Banks is set in California in 1961 but flashes back to Australia in 1907 and Travers' early childhood.

Walt Disney (winningly played by Tom Hanks) has a problem. Many years ago, when his two daughters were quite young, he made a promise to them that he would make a movie of their favorite story-book character, Mary Poppins, the heroine of the series of popular books by English author P.L. Travers. His problem is that Travers (a bravura performance by Emma Thompson) doesn't want to sell him the screen rights to make the movie and has been refusing to do so for two decades. But Ms. Travers also has a problem - money. Her books aren't selling as well as they once did, and the only way out of her financial situation seems to be agreeing to meet with Disney about finally selling him the screen rights. This quickly becomes a clash between Disney's charming but determined irresistible force and Travers' seemingly immovable objections to everything about the project, which despite her needs she seems determined to prevent.
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147 of 168 people found the following review helpful By StrangePegs on January 9, 2014
Saving Mr. Banks is the kind of film that Hollywood ought to love. It's about how one of the most beloved movies in movie history got made. And it's the first time Walt Disney has ever been portrayed in a movie, so that's saying a lot. And, just to put all of this perspective, when Disney first heard that the movie was being made, they're first reaction was to buy it and squash it. See, there's a reason Walt has never been portrayed onscreen before. However, after looking at it, they decided not only not to do that but to produce it! It's that kind of movie.

And it's good. I mean, it's really good. I know it is because my wife cried through about the last third of it. I will be extremely surprised if it doesn't get the best picture Oscar this year. Overall, from what we've seen so far, I think it's most well rounded show out there. And it leaves you feeling good after having had a good cry.

Not to get into what the movie is about, but it's about how Walt Disney convinced P. L. Travers to give him the rights to make Mary Poppins, something it took him 20 years to do. Along with that story, you see the story of the defining moment of Travers' childhood, which shows why Poppins was so important to her. From what I've seen from fact-checking, the movie is fairly accurate, which is another plus. A big one, actually. They did have hours and hours of audio recordings from sessions with Travers and some of the people working on the movie (because she insisted that everything be recorded), so they wouldn't have had a good excuse for it not being accurate.

So, first, let's talk Tom Hanks. Oh, man, Tom Hanks was... incredible. There were moments, especially when they showed him watching himself on the old black and white TV show Walt introduced, where he was just like Disney.
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