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Saving the Pitcher Paperback – March 14, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 204 pages
  • Publisher: Ivan R. Dee; 1 edition (March 14, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1566637287
  • ISBN-13: 978-1566637282
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #647,308 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Saving the Pitcher is a must read for anyone who wants solidly researched data from an impartial baseball thinker.... It is the right book, by the right guy, for the right reason, at the right time. (Dr. Tom House, National Pitching Association)

Will Carroll has invaluable inside medical information you cannot get anywhere else. (Peter Gammons, ESPN)

Will Carroll talks about the controversy his writings might stir up, but the real value of this book is how it will improve the game of baseball for all who play and watch.... Saving the Pitcher is a wonderful combination of entertainment and education. Whether you are a youth baseball coach, a college pitcher, a general manager for a Major League Baseball team, or anyone else who loves baseball, this is a book you will enjoy reading. (Glenn Fleisig, Ph.D., American Sports Medicine Institute)

Will Carroll has brought to the average baseball fan the medical information and analysis that was once reserved for trainers, coaches, and front office personnel. (Keith Law, Toronto Blue Jays)

In this illuminating study, Will Carroll is able to deconstruct the complexities of pitching—and pitching injuries—and explain them to the average fan.... This book be invaluable to fathers and coaches who are preparing young pitchers for professional careers.... A fascinating read, and an important book. (Alex Belth, Bronx Banter)

Saving the Pitcher is like Saving Private Ryan on a ball field, with Will Carroll trying to protect the latest generation of pitchers from the arm-weary fate of their predecessors. It's about time someone codified all the ways a pitcher's arm can fall off, and more importantly, all the ways that those injuries might be prevented. (Steven Goldman, author of The Pinstriped Bible and Forging Genius: The Making of Casey Stengel)

Innovative and useful.... Will nails it in this book, as he always does. (Jamey Newberg, The Newberg Minor League Report)

It's a very interesting book. It is a must-read for all coaches and parents of anyone involved with Little League or higher baseball. (Mobile Register)

It is an essential reading for all those interested in this game. (Fadil Ozyener Journal Of Sports Science and Medicine)

For those who missed Will Carroll's Saving the Pitcher...shame on you. (Peter Gammons ESPN the Magazine)

Provides a detailed, in-depth analysis.... This is no casual survey...grounded in much research. (Bookwatch)

Excellent. (Roto Authority)

About the Author

Will Carroll writes for Baseball Prospectus and was one of the first writers to break the news that Pete Rose will return to baseball. Since the publication of Saving the Pitcher, Mr. Carroll has published an authoritative work about steriods in baseball, The Juice, published by Ivan R. Dee in 2005. He lives in Indianapolis.

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Passaretti on May 31, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Anyone who has read Will Carroll's work for Baseball Prospectus or even his weblog has learned more about injuries from him than from every baseball broadcast combined. Unfortunately, he is baseball's only "medhead" so it will take some time to spread the knowledge. Writing a book is the first step.
"Saving The Pitcher" finally gives us a starting point for discussing injuries. It breaks down every component of the pitching motion--that is, what each body part contributes to the motion and proper technique for doing so. Carroll also informs us of what contributes to injuries, warning signs (velocity loss=shoulder; control loss=elbow) and the right training and exercise programs.
While STP is well written, it sometimes reads as a textbook. Although, when you think about it, it really is a textbook of sorts. That isn't to say it's like taking a biology class; Carroll's enthusiasm for baseball shines through to make the book quite enjoyable.
I also would have liked it if he went more in-depth on V-Loss. I suppose he wants to gather more data on it first before formally presenting it, perhaps in a book of its own.
That quibble aside, STP is a great book. Baseball fans should check it out, and every professional, college, high school, and (most importantly) Little League coach should be mandated to read it before being allowed near a young pitcher. Hopefully this is the first of many more volumes from Will Carroll.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "derekjacques" on June 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In clear language, Saving The Pitcher explains the biggest issues relating to a pitcher's health, and the combined efforts required of a team's training staff, physician, pitching coach, manager, and the pitcher himself to save the pitcher from injury. Will Carroll systematically goes through the pitching process -- describing the anatomy used in pitching, the mechanics of the pitching motion, the preparation and conditioning a pitcher should use, and the workload to which a pitching arm should be subjected -- to show how injuries can be prevented.

One of the great things about this book is that Carroll is fearless while discussing his subject. The first time Will mentions Leo Mazzone -- the celebrated Atlanta Braves coach who some think could be the first pitching coach in the Hall of Fame -- it's to criticize Mazzone's teachings about a pitcher's ideal follow-through. It's not as if Carroll is a Leo-hater (Will says plenty of complementary things about Mazzone elsewhere in the book) it's simply that Carroll isn't intimidated by any pitching expert, no matter how famous or successful they are, when it comes to talking about pitching injuries.
If you're in any way curious about the types of arm surgery you read about in the sports section of the newspaper, if you have a kid that's getting serious about pitching in Little League or high school, or if you just wonder why that slider you tried out as a teenager was so damn painful to throw, you'll want to get your hands on this book. There's plenty of information for you between these covers.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Robert Varak on July 16, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Mr. Carroll does a marvelous job assembling and disseminating the evolving body of knowledge on this topic in a manner which is accessible and engaging. Contrary to the statements made by another recent reviewer, Mr. Carroll _does_ have a background in sports medicine. He relies up on this, but never loses sight of his audience.
This book is invaluable reading for both experts and neophytes alike. Few areas are more misunderstood than the health and training of pitchers, and knowledge of and adherence to the principles espoused by Carroll and his subjects would go a long way toward improving pitchers' health and the overall quality of baseball.
If you love baseball, read it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Adam Strasberg on May 16, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I have to say I found this book griping. It was well written and as odd as this might sound, I found it hard to put down.

Will Carroll while not a medical professional is the top writer in the field of baseball injuries, writing both for "Under the Knife" for Baseball Prospectus website and his own blog The Juice. He makes it his business to know and understand baseball injuries and has a style that explains very complicated medical issues to lay people like myself.

This book makes a fascinating read, and I would highly recommend it for baseball fans (anyone interested in learning more about the game within the game), parents of young pitchers or anyone involved in the teaching of baseball skills.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By N. Yakovenko on November 20, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Will Carroll is not qualified as a doctor, a player, a coach, or anything else that might seem relevant to make him an "expert" on baseball injuries. I don't hold that against him, though.

As mentioned by other reviewers (and claimed by the author), this book offers information about pitcher injuries that is not written about in any other popular book. The chapter on the "Anatomy of Pitching" makes the book worth reading for any baseball junkie. Will Carroll explains, in 24 pages (including drawings), the major bodily stresses that pitching causes to the body, and the common injuries that result.

However it is hard to overlook both the poor organization of the book, and how often Carroll claims things that are not (and could probably not ever be) substantiated by science. He claims, unequivocally, that there is a "one best" pitching motion, which is exactly defined, better than all others, and the proper use of which will result in no pitching injuries. He implies that he has implicit support for this idea from famously scientific-minded pitching coaches like Dr. Mike Marshall and Tom House. I believe this is a bit misleading. Mike Marshall has never written a book, but Tom House has. If you want to read a much more thorough, non-dogmatic bit of research on effective pitching, I would highly recommend it.

Apart from his dogmatic approach, it's also frustrating to see Carroll jumping around between topics, never giving much depth, or sometimes not completing a logical thought process for what he does choose to focus on. For example, he writes a long (and rather interesting) chapter on how modern statistics show the extent of Eric Gagne's dominance during the 2003 season.
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