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Say Something Paperback – August 1, 2008


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Paperback, August 1, 2008
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 and up
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten and up
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Tilbury House Publishers (August 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780884483106
  • ISBN-13: 978-0884483106
  • ASIN: 088448310X
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 9.2 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #505,425 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 5–This story takes an interesting slant on an important topic. A young narrator describes different examples of bullying that she witnesses at school and on the bus, but remains silent. One day, when her friends are absent, she must sit alone in the cafeteria, and several students make jokes at her expense. In addition to feeling angry about being treated this way, the girl is frustrated with the other kids who look on sympathetically but say nothing. She is then able to empathize with other victims. The next day, she approaches a quiet girl who is often teased and finds a new friend. As well as demonstrating different examples of bullying, the author gradually but clearly illustrates that being a silent bystander contributes to the problem. Points are made quickly and simply, and the narrative has a natural flow that immediately draws readers in. Back pages include topics for discussion, practical and proactive advice for kids who are being targeted, and some good Web sites. The realistic watercolor illustrations depict busy school life and represent a diverse population. Emotions are portrayed beautifully through facial expression and body language. Suitable for independent reading or for sharing aloud, this book can be used in a classroom environment to set the stage for important dialogue about this universal and ageless issue.–Corrina Austin, Locke's Public School, St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

K-Gr. 3 Can one person make a difference? Moss' obviously didactic book, which seems designed for group discussion about bullying, focuses on the role of the bystander, a girl who sees the sadness of the victim but does nothing ("I walk on the other side of the hall. I don't say those things"). Realistic, lively watercolor illustrations show the child in a diverse school community, where kids are picked on and called names for being slow or different. The girl feels sad for them, but she looks away--until one day, when she is alone, the bullies make her cry, and her friends do nothing. The dramatic climax is quiet: the girl reaches out to a child who always sits alone on the bus, and the children have fun together. This is one of the best of the recent books for discussion about teasing; its direct, first-person narrative and informal portraits bring close classroom, hallway, and schoolyard scenarios for kids and adults to talk about. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Award-winning author Peggy Moss worked as a teacher, Assistant Attorney General, and Assistant Director for the Center for the Prevention of Hate Violence before beginning her writing career.

Her books are used in homes, schools and agencies around the world to start conversations about friendship and bullying. Schools from Shanghai to Maine have introduced "Say Something" days, created school murals, and developed bullying workshops and theater programs using the book. Former First Lady Barbara Bush chose to read Say Something for her literacy program, and the ADL uses Say Something in its Words That Heal program.

Students have written papers and stories based on both books, including the sequel "Do Something" by 3d graders in Rochester New York, and many readers have sent their own funny, insightful and sweet friendship rules to the author.

Peggy works with students, educators and parents throughout North America. She believes kids are the real experts on bullying and teasing.

How the Books Came to Be:

Peggy wrote Say Something after meeting "Sara" at the end of a workshop on preventing hate violence. Sara was training to become a school nurse, and Peggy had just spent 3 hours talking about the impact of bullying and teasing on kids, and developing strategies to help kids talk about the issues they encountered.

Sara said, "That most painful workshop I've ever experienced." (Which made Peggy think she'd really blown it), but then Sara explained that it was painful in an enlightening way: her own school experience as a nightmare - kids put notes on her back, spread rumors about her, and shifted away so that they wouldn't have to sit next to her on the bus. Sara begged her parents to let her leave that school. Her parents told her to buck up. A few months later, Sara started to injure herself. When her parents realized what was happening they were horrified. They moved.

"But that's not what I wanted to talk to you about," she told Peggy.

"About two weeks ago, a woman walked up to me on the street and said, 'Sara? Sara? Is that you? You look so great!' I had no idea who she was. She just kept talking. 'Sara, I went to high school with you... and I just wanted to say, I always felt so sorry for you in school.' I looked at this woman and I could tell she wanted me to say 'Thanks for feeling sorry for me,' or 'Oh, that's nice.' - but I couldn't say that. All I could think was, 'you never once said 'hi' to me. You never spoke up for me. You never even sat next to me.'

I didn't respond. I just looked at her and turned away."

Say Something is a story about the power of speaking up in your own way. (Which may not include words), because the cost of doing nothing is too high.

Our Friendship Rules is a collaboration between Peggy and her niece, Dee Dee Tardif, who was 14 when they started working on the story. Together, they wanted to write a book that talked about how friendship really feels - that it's sometimes hard and complicated, but it's possible to keep friends even when you mess up. (And let's be honest - everybody messes up sometimes). They wrote the book while Dee Dee was living in Toronto, and Peggy was living in Sri Lanka, and then Freeport, Maine.

You can contact Peggy directly by visiting her site, SaySomethingNow.com Peggy lives with photographer John Beebe and their daughters in Toronto, Canada.

Customer Reviews

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As a retired classroom teacher, I have read many books to classes over the years.
J. Werden
This book reminds us that we have the power to say something about what is going on around us.
Victoria Powers
I've seen a positive impact on our student population through the use of this book.
Books That Heal Kids

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I only wish I had read this when I was in elementary school, then maybe I would have had the guts to stand up and say something to the bullies. (Also, it would have been a great resource for my parents when I was subsequently bullied myself.)
My son is only 17 months old, but I intend to make sure he has the courage to say "That's not cool!" when someone is being picked on. Thank you, Peggy Moss!
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By T. Brooks on June 3, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I read this book with my two children, and they immediately responded to it. They've since become "Say Something" believers and have carried the practice with them to school. They also insisted we buy extra copies for their school library so other kids could read it. A terrific book.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By debbie chizewer on June 3, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Say Something is an exceptionally meaningful book that artfully allows the reader to grow in step with the main character. Through the eyes and voice of a "bystander" to bullying, we learn: (1) everybody is vulnerable to teasing/bullying; and (2) when we witness wrongdoing, we can and must take action. This book offers the material needed to launch important discussions at school and at home.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 11, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Peggy Moss's first book is a short, sweet, smart look into the everyday world of a school-aged girl who 'says nothing' when she sees children being bullied, she merely notes it. When it happens to her, she learns a lesson. It's obvious to readers that, of course, we should speak up or speak to someone being bullied, but how many of us do? And how many of us, like this young girl, have been bullied ourselves? With wavery watercolor illustrations by Lea Lyon, of a diverse student population, Moss's book reminds us to be kind, to be present, to be aware that others exist and deserve inclusion. It's an obvious message, but one that is overlooked too often. The writing is simple in the best sense. Children will learn from this book, and hopefully will keep it in their hearts.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on June 1, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In my school, of course, teasing and bullying are against school rules but some people do it anyway. If the teasing stops within 30 seconds they were probobly just joking. If it dosen't stop I try to get the kids interested in something else. For me that has always worked but in the future I might just have to stand up for other kids rights. So what this book is saying is, don't just stand there or walk away, be part of the solution! Like the title says, Say Something!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Brown on July 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Rebeccasreads highly recommends SAY SOMETHING as an important picture book with something to say!

It's one thing to notice how your schoolmates get along, which ones are always alone, & who is always teased. It's quite another thing to be on the receiving end. So what do you do? Do you do anything?

SAY SOMETHING urges you, in scene after scene, to become aware, to test your courage, to step forward & do unto others as you would have them do unto you, especially when teasers & taunters are looking for a bit of put-down fun.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Genevieve Petrillo on March 11, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Say Something portrays an enormous message with a minimum number of words. As I read it to my class of 3rd graders, their response was immediate and powerful. They identified with the characters on many levels, and for the first few pages, thought that being a silent, "innocent" bystander WAS the right thing to do. As the story went on, their faces and comments demonstrated that they had reached the realization that they had the power to help. Months later, they still talk about the concepts introduced to them in the story. When we discuss problems at Class Meeting, it's not unusual to hear, "We have to look out for each other. Nobody wants to be a bystander!"
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jeskap on May 20, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book should be read to every child and by every adult in the nation. It manages to celebrate and promote decency and compassion, all without a hint of preachiness.
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