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112 of 114 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ECONOMICAL MULTI-FUNCTION FUEL ECONOMY COMPUTER AND CODE SCANNER
I have had the Scan Gauge II in my Toyota Yaris for about 3 months now, and have tested it's functionality in a wide range of city and freeway driving. Since the car is only a year old, I haven't needed to scan any trouble codes yet, so I am using the SGII primarily as a fuel economy computer.
SGII connects directly to the OBD-2 diagnostic port that is present on...
Published on November 18, 2007 by L. G. CHARLOT

versus
65 of 82 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No Customer Service
I have owned my ScanGauge II for almost a year now and overall it has functioned pretty much as advertised. I say "almost" because it had an initial problem with communicating with any vehicle I tried to scan. I sent an email to the company and received a reply within hours asking for an address they should ship the replacement to. They apparently had a bad batch and were...
Published on September 2, 2008 by Disapointed


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112 of 114 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ECONOMICAL MULTI-FUNCTION FUEL ECONOMY COMPUTER AND CODE SCANNER, November 18, 2007
By 
L. G. CHARLOT (California, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: ScanGauge II Ultra Compact 3-in-1 Automotive Computer with Customizable Real-Time Fuel Economy Digital Gauges (Automotive)
I have had the Scan Gauge II in my Toyota Yaris for about 3 months now, and have tested it's functionality in a wide range of city and freeway driving. Since the car is only a year old, I haven't needed to scan any trouble codes yet, so I am using the SGII primarily as a fuel economy computer.
SGII connects directly to the OBD-2 diagnostic port that is present on most vehicles sold in the US since 1996. The manufacturer, Linear Logic, publishs a list on the company website showing specifically which makes and models of cars and light trucks that the unit will and will not work in.

Features: The SGII reads the data stream from the car's engine control computer, and uses this data to calculate and display, in real time, the engine's fuel consumption, RPM, coolant temperature, throttle loading, and Trip/Tank statistics like how many miles you can go on remaining fuel, and how much $$$ worth of gas has been burned on the current trip. The unit offers something like 40 different functions and guage displays - go to the company website for a complete list.

What I like about the product: Adds fuel economy displays, plus some other guages like Water Temp and RPM, that weren't available even as options on my Toyota Yaris. The fuel economy computer feature is something that you usually see only on up-scale cars costing over $30,000 - ScanGuage II adds this functionality to almost any OBD-II complient car for only $159. The Yaris fuel guage isn't very accurate, whereas the SG-II tells me to 1/10 of a gallon how much gas I have left. At each fill-up, you can re-calibrate the SGII with the exact amount of gas pumped. This is nice because fuel density changes with the seasons as average daily temperature rise and falls, which results in changes of up to 10% in how many gallons it takes to effect a fill-up.

The SGII is pretty compact, so most owners will be able to find some place on or under the dash to mount it. At night, the display screen is backlit well enough. At night, with the backlight on, the contrast between the display background and the numbers isn't as great as I'd like, but the screen is readable enough. The backlighting is provided by a multi-color LED, and the user can select between about 16 different colors.
The display update/refresh rate is once per second (fast mode), or once per two seconds (regular mode), so the unit's RPM display may not update quickly enough for use as a real-time tachometer in a manual transmission car. However, you could certainly use it to calibrate an analog tach
Ease of use: The SGII is self-powered from the OBD-II connector, and needs no batteries. It only uses a single ethernet-type cable to connect it to the OBD-II port. One 6' cable comes with the unit, and additional cables can be purchased for $20 if you want to use your SGII in more than one car.
The SGII can be used in multiple cars, but moving the unit to a different car probably erases the "current" and "prior day" trip data.
Usefulness: This gadget is really helpful on long trips to let you know when you need to make a gas stop. In mountainous terrain, most cars use a lot more gas than when cruising on the "flats", and SGII immediately updates the tank-remaining-mileage if terrain or driving conditions change substantially. The device is sensitive enough to show even small differences in fuel economy like the difference between air conditioning on or off, headlights on or off, and tailgate up/down. The most obvious difference in fuel economy comes with changes in speed, and SGII shows in hard numbers that 75mph cruising will hurt fuel economy as much as 30% compared to keeping it under 60.
The other primary use for SGII is to scan your car's OBD-II engine control computer and display the actual trouble code when your "check engine" warning light comes on. Assuming you have a listing of the trouble codes for your car, this feature could tell you the difference between minor glitches for which repair can be delayed a few days, and major failures that need to be fixed right away. Once a fault has been repaired, SGII can be used to tell the car's OBD-II computer to reset the trouble code. I haven't used this feature myself yet, but the owner's manual describes the function well enough.

Conclusion: For $159, this is a pretty cool gadget to have in your car, especially as the price or gas is now well above $3.00 (diesel approaching $4.00/gallon in some parts of the US!). And yes, SGII works in most Diesel vehicles made after 1996 (see the list on Linear Logic's website). Highly recommended as a really useful automobile accessory that offers a LOT of "bang-for-the-buck".

UPDATE: September 2010. Have used this gadget for almost three years in my Yaris and in my Dodge diesel truck, and still functioning perfectly, despite being cooked in the hot summer sun on the dashboard several times.

One issue I have noticed when using it in the Dodge: If I run through a tank of fuel while towing a heavy trailer, then another tank of fuel while the truck is unloaded (not towing or hauling anything), the calibration changes substantially. I usually use something like "45%" for unloaded, and "25%" when towing. However, even these numbers are only rough starting points. In general, over level ground at 55mph, I expect to get 20mpg unloaded, and 14mpg towing a 7800# RV trailer. But the Scan Guage is rarely consistant, even when I am careful to set the calibration to the same numbers I calculated the last time I towed the trailer. I guess other factors like average grade, temperature, and elevation must be affecting the fuel consumption/tank return ratio of the truck's fuel injection system, and this is resulting in inconsistent reporting of fuel economy from the ScanGuage. A typical inconsistency: I drove 300 miles at 45 mph, unloaded, and the scan guage reported 35 mpg (completely unrealistic for a 3/4 ton truck, of course). Actual fuel economy was 24. So I re-calibrated, and on the next tank of fuel, the ScanGuage reported only 10 mpg when I was really getting 16 (I was towing the trailer again on this tank). This is ONLY an issue with my diesel truck, when I install the gadget in my gasoline car, it is very consistant from one tank of fuel to another, and I rarely have to change the calibration after the two fill-ups. I still like the ScanGuage and recommend it, just be aware that apparently the way it interprets fuel consumption data from the ECM in a diesel engine vehicle isn't as stable or consistant as you would get in a gasoline vehicle.

UPDATE: July 22 2013. My SGII is still working perfectly after 6 years of exposure to summer heat (140ºF in the car when parked in direct sun). I have still not needed it to check trouble codes, however, so those features are still untested. NOTE: Read your owners manual thoroughly, and keep it in a safe place, you may need to refer to it at a later date so you don't want to lose it or discard it. You can also download PDF's of the user manuals from the Linear Logic website. I recently re-read my manual and discovered that the SGII can be customized to add additional gauges to the display. It really is an amazing little gadget. I hope the quality of newly manufactured ones is still as good as my 6-year old one. It's also nice that the price is still $159 and has not gone up with inflation.
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96 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars gives you all the information you want/need, August 29, 2005
This review is from: ScanGauge II Ultra Compact 3-in-1 Automotive Computer with Customizable Real-Time Fuel Economy Digital Gauges (Automotive)
This little box is very useful. In my case it already paid for itself. I was able to clear some service codes (misfire of a cylinder). In the past I paid $69 for the mechanic to just look up and clear the code.

I really like the fact that ScanGauge displays all kinds of engine data in real time. Other devices such as the CarChip save it and then need to be connected to a computer in order to access the data.

In my opinion, the ScanGauge is worth every cent.
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67 of 73 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ScanGauge 2 Works As Advertised, November 3, 2007
By 
Gregory G. "Gaget Guru" (Queens, New York United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: ScanGauge II Ultra Compact 3-in-1 Automotive Computer with Customizable Real-Time Fuel Economy Digital Gauges (Automotive)
I've had the scanGuage II for about 3 weeks at the time of this review. I had bought the unit because I was interested in finding out about how my car, a 2002 Toyota Solara was holding up and what the car computer might tell me.

First the cons:
1. The cord is too long. The total run from the ODB II port to where the unit is
mounted is about a 15 inches, top. It would have been nice to have sockets
on both the plug and the SG II. Include a long and short cord, or just have it
so that cat5e network cable could be used.
Why? Because storing the excess cable somewhere is a problem, I ended up
storing in inside the panel protecting the steering column, and may have
created a short in one vehicle lighting circuits.

2. The velcro is too weak to hold the unit in place. I ended up using Radio Shack
LockTite fasteners (the clear ones) instead.
3. The manual leaves a lot to be desired, especially the pictures which are so low
contrast and dark they are useless. I had to go online and download the
manual as a PDF file.

Pros: The ScanGuage works as advertised. To me this is the Holy Grail of
advertising. It barely is worth repeating the items for sale that deliver what
they promise.

1. The display is large and very legible, even at night (or especially at night).
2. The diagnostics (both realtime and stored) are comprehensive
3. The codes are easy to read.

The biggest pro for me is being able to monitor my actual Miles Per Gallon
*mileage* I've changed my driving style from constant foot on the gas
pedal to gas-and-coast. A tank of gas lasts SO much longer now, because I
now know how much a lead foot costs. In fact for any given trip I can tell
how much it costs not only in dollars and cents, but also by engine load and
how far (or further) I got just coasting along.

The unit is (in my black & gray interior) inconspicuous, and the slightly
cheap look to the unit works to it's advantage: no one takes it seriously as
"a thing worth stealing."

If I had any indication that someone would understand what it does, I'd be
recommending it left and right. As it stands, it is something of a specialty
item, except you soon wonder how you ever got along without it.
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73 of 81 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Be more knowledgeable about your car, October 19, 2007
This review is from: ScanGauge II Ultra Compact 3-in-1 Automotive Computer with Customizable Real-Time Fuel Economy Digital Gauges (Automotive)
Being a geek, I bought the ScanGauge II so that I could see more information in real time about my car. The ScanGauge should appeal to anyone who watched Night Rider and was envious of all the cool displays inside Kit. The good news is that this little device does give you so much more cool information about your car as you drive. Rather than guess why your car had bad mileage, you can tell immediately it was because you had the throttle down too much or your average speed was 85 mph. The real value of this gadget is that it gives you hard data to point to when your car acts a little funny.

The first thing you'll have to figure out is where to mount it. I drive a RAV4, and I've found the best place is under the center console. It stays out of the way and gives your passengers something cool to look at while you're driving. I would not recommend putting it in your line of site, like a HUD in an F-16. The numbers will distract you and then you'll have bigger problems than bad gas mileage. Finding a good place to mount is critical. That leads me to my first complaint: the ScanGauge is just heavy enough that Velcro won't hold it for long periods of time. After my car has been in the hot sun, the ScanGauge simply falls. It is a habit now for me to stick the ScanGauge back up every time I get in the car. I've contemplated using superglue to make sure it stays, but I don't want to damage the interior.

The realtime data is very handy, but I wish the screen updated a little faster. There are multiple settings (slow, normal, and fast), but fast isn't quite fast enough. The numbers always lag behind about half a second, making it impossible to drive your car to the data. The trip data is much more interesting and useful. Once I calibrated my speed and fuel mileage, I was surprised to see how accurate it was. Every time I fill up gas, I know how much I have to put in. It is usually accurate within a half gallon. Knowing my fuel mileage has been great for my lead foot too. When I see my mileage lower than normal, I know I have to start taking it easy. There are four trips computed by the ScanGauge: Current, Tank, Today, and Yesterday. These are hardcoded, and you can't change them, so if you go on a long trip, you can't keep one average for the whole thing.

Overall, I would recommend the ScanGauge to any geek who wants to know everything about the car.
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172 of 197 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars High Utility Factor, Intuitive Interface, but has bugs and issues, February 7, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: ScanGauge II Ultra Compact 3-in-1 Automotive Computer with Customizable Real-Time Fuel Economy Digital Gauges (Automotive)
The installation of the SG2 is simple: attach the OBD2 connector to the DLC port and attach the RJ-45 jack to the SG2 unit. Routing the cable is really up to the operator. I chose to do it in a crude manner because I don't plan to make it a permanent addition to the car. I zip tied the cable to my HVAC vents and anchored it to the empty traction control hole behind the glove box.

I used 1 of the provided velcro kits to affix the SG2 to the top of my steering column so that it is right below the instrument panel. It actually blocks my view of the shift indicator array, although I can still see it clearly if I lean forward.

The update rate set at FAST is still rather slow and that is to be expected with the outdated OBD-II network. The "fastest" aftermarket scan tool that I have seen is SCT's Live Link for Ford / GM / Chryslers. If you want anything faster, you are going to have to borrow an OEM's scan tool system.

The X-Gauge interface is a bit cumbersome since you are restricted to using 2 buttons to enter alphanumeric characters while if you pause for anything more than 10-15 seconds, the SG2 shuts down. According to Linear Logic, they are working on an updated SG2 with datalogging features so hopefully they incorporate a PC interface to speed up programming and setup times.

I have it set to monitor instantaneous MPG, RPM, Vehicle Speed, and a gauge that I frequently switch depending on my mood. I am monitoring the torque converter slip ratio. Whenever it reads below 1.00, it means the torque converter is "slipping". Above 1.00 means the output side of the converter is spinning faster than the input side and theoretically it could just mean engine braking with some torque converter slip. You can program custom X-Gauges to monitor gross engine horsepower or torque input at the transmission.

I had previously used a Garmin Forerunner 101 to check my GPS vehicle speed and compared it to my speedometer readout (2000 Ford Crown Vic with mechanical speedometer). It revealed that my GPS speed was about 2-3 mph slower than the speedometer indicated speed. The SG2's vehicle speed readout (from the Vehicle Speed Sensor PID in the OBD-2 system) is approximately 2-3 mph slower than the speedometer reading and I am assuming this is the same readout as my GPS (I didn't get a chance to verify this yet).

Some of the gauges I like to monitor are Coolant Temperature, Intake Air Temperature, Transmission Fluid Temperature (XGauge), Torque Converter Slip Ratio (XGauge), Gross Horsepower (XGauge), RPM, Vehicle Speed, and MPG.

I still haven't been able to figure out how to work the trip computer properly to display averaged fuel economy. The instantaneous MPG is more important to me because I want to see if anything is not working right on long cruises. I have often wondered if the torque converter was locking properly when I use cruise control or when cruising on the highway.

The data collection stability is impressive. I never ran into many problems with Car Code or SCT's Live Link, but SG2 is just more convenient and compact. The backlight colors are interesting as they allow you to choose 4 different values of each RGB component (or 64 possible combinations). I have it set to R=3, B=0, G=0 so that it resembles Pontiac's interior lighting (I drive a Ford).

My only real complaint is that there's not a better way of attaching the SG2 to the car. A suction cup mount for the windshield would come in handy since I could mount it near my line of sight without relying on adhesive-backed velcro. The interface is quite intuitive but I would have liked a way to program the X-gauge more easily, like via a PC interface.

Bottom line: The SG2 is a great deal if you are interested in data readouts for your car. There are cheaper ways of pulling DTC codes, so the only real usefulness of SG2 is the "realtime" PID monitoring and the trip computer for cars that do not have such devices. If you know someone who is a bona fide gearhead and drives a car made in 1996 or newer, they may appreciate the SG2 as a gift.

UPDATE:
While the ScanGauge II provided a useful feature for cars without trip computers or onboard monitoring for various PIDs, I have noticed that it began to malfunction more frequently. The gauge readouts began to "flicker" between PIDs. For example, monitoring IGNition, the IGN began to switch rapidly between HPR. Just recently, the entire ScanGauge II shutdown while I was driving. It would refuse to reconnect with the OBD2 network. When it did find a connection, a lot of the text was garbled and it lost all of my trip data except for the total mileage. My car normally maxes out on 300 miles per tank of gasoline, so I was bewildered when the SG2 said I drove over 4000 miles. Other SG2 readers have reported similar quirks, albeit not as serious as the self shutdown and data corruption that I experienced.

Many newer cars already have features built-into the car. The Pontiac G8, and Nissan GT-R are two examples of cars that have very developed "trip computers" while many other modern vehicles like the Pontiac G6, have trip computers that can monitor most of the fuel-related data.
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274 of 317 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Feature Packed!, March 30, 2007
By 
After reading several other reviews on the web for this product, I decided to place an order for one. I just received the unit this week and immediately hooked it up. You should set your engine size, fuel type (gas/diesel/hybrid), units of measure, and your fuel tank size - rounded down to the nearest whole number to allow for the best accuracy in the scangauge. It's a simple installation. Just plug it into your vehicle's OBDII port and choose a suitable mounting location that doesn't interfere with your other gauges or present a safety hazard. (velcro strips are included for no muss/no fuss installation, but you could devise a more permanent mount)

Depending upon the parameters that your vehicle reports, here are some of the things this device can show you:

4 sets of trip data is stored - Current Trip, Today's Trip, Previous Day, and Current Tank. In addition, fuel economy, fuel used, maximum coolant temperature, distance, maximum rpm, drive time, maximum speed, average speed, distance to empty, time to empty, and amount of fuel to empty.

The digital gauges are for fuel economy, fuel rate, digital speedometer, tachometer, manifold pressure, battery voltage, coolant temperature, intake air temperature, engine load, ignition timing, throttle position, and open/closed loop. You can display any choice of 4 of these digital gauges on the gauge screen at one time and it's easy to cycle through them. Not all vehicles will report every one of the above parameters through the OBDII interface. If the data is not available for the chosen gauge, then there will be no display.

The final thing that this gauge is useful for is to read and reset trouble codes and your "check engine" or "service engine soon" lamp. It captures the conditions present and stores them in flash memory if a trouble code is thrown so that you can review what state the various gauges were in when the trouble code triggered.

Again, I just received this item this week, but did quite a bit of research on it before purchasing. I am very impressed by the amount of information the ScanGauge makes available. Utilizing the data, I believe I'll be able to improve my gas mileage, as I will have instant feedback on my inputs as a driver. It's fun to use too. One other thing I forgot to mention is that you can program the back-light to 63 different colors. It comes with 7 standard colors already programmed.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth its weight in gold, September 4, 2007
This review is from: ScanGauge II Ultra Compact 3-in-1 Automotive Computer with Customizable Real-Time Fuel Economy Digital Gauges (Automotive)
Just plug it in and data starts coming out. Not flashy, but extremely useful. Can be used to replace expensive gauges as well as perform diagnostic work. Your frends will want to borrow it to check out their own vehicles. Variable color backlighting is very cool. One word of caution. Do not reset the error codes and then bring the car in for service if you think you have a real fault. The dealer will not be able to diagnose your car if you have reset everything. Also, telling the repair place what the error code was will not help. For example, MINI and BMW have an entirely separate set of error codes (not the government mandated P codes) that are only read using their proprietary diagnostic equipment. I use the ScanGauge as a supplemental gauge set since many modern cars with gauges do not display information in a straightforward way. The water temp may be "filtered" so that the gauge reads normal unless there is a wild excursion. Real temp variations are suppressed to avoid service calls.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Saves Gas-Paid for itself, July 4, 2008
By 
Kenneth M. Nyberg (Eden Prairie, MN USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: ScanGauge II Ultra Compact 3-in-1 Automotive Computer with Customizable Real-Time Fuel Economy Digital Gauges (Automotive)
I have been able to increase the mileage on my '98 high mileage Ranger pickup from mid 17s all the time to mid 20s all the time now. No small deal. Other people I know who got one of these or something similar all seem to get about 10% better by some changes in driving behavior. It's human nature to see how well you can do. By watching some more engine parameters than just gas mileage, I am able to optimize shift points, speeds, etc. If you have a car that already has a capable trip computer, you probably won't need this, although this will give you far more information. The added benefit of reading and RESETTING check engine codes is a really big deal. I used several times, saving plenty of money. I agree the manual is ummmm, not so good, but like another reviewer said, you can download the manual.
There are lots of good reviews here to give you a decent feel for the device. All I add is, "GO FOR IT!"
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The only gauge youll ever need, May 14, 2008
By 
Daniel Pugh (Pennsauken, NJ USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: ScanGauge II Ultra Compact 3-in-1 Automotive Computer with Customizable Real-Time Fuel Economy Digital Gauges (Automotive)
At first I justified buying this because in the long run, i could chnge my driving habits for better fuel economy, saving me money. The instantaneous fuel economy and throttle % indicators have helped me accomplish this. I am now getting better than the EPA ratecd fuel economy on my car. EPA city: 20 Highway: 27 Combined: 23. I am usuing this to get an average of 33 mpg. This is great now that gas prices have soared, and that is with no other modifications to my car than plugging this into it, and adjusting my driving style. Considering the amount of driving I do (90 miles/day typical), the scangauge is priceless.

Not only does it give fuel economy, It also has a variety of other sensors. Anything the car's computer knows, it can tell you. Coolant temperature, RPM (great since my car dosen't have a tachometer), MPH, gallons of gas/hour, and many more. It also stores trip data, such as top speed (great to know if you have a kid driving), avg speeed, top RPM, total distance, gallons of gas used, and avg fuel economy, not only for the current trip, but for that day and the previous day, and also for the tank of gas. It also lets you know if it has been disconnected from the car's computer at any point during the day.

In addition to these functions, it also provides error codes that can easily be referenced online, allowing you to diagnose and fix your own problems instead of taking it to a mechanic who will probably charge a fee just to plug it in. I printed them out so i can easily decipher whats wrong in case something happens while I'm on the road

I've had this for 3 weeks, and I think its a great product which is consistent and indispensible once you have one.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great gift for the car enthusiast, January 27, 2008
By 
Sais (Pittsburgh, PA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: ScanGauge II Ultra Compact 3-in-1 Automotive Computer with Customizable Real-Time Fuel Economy Digital Gauges (Automotive)
I saw a review on Mojo channel where the reviewer used the MPG display to increase mileage.
Based on this I bought one and I'm not disappointed.
I can see this easily paying for itself in less than a year.
The real time MPG display allows you to tame that lead foot and get awesome mileage on a long run.
I did an 8 hour drive last week and must have got conservatively 5MPG better fuel economy. You do have to work at viewing the display and feeding it back to that right foot. Very easy to install - under 5 minutes.
If you're not a gadget fan then don't buy it.
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