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Scarlet (The King Raven Trilogy, Book 2) Hardcover – September 18, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (September 18, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595540865
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595540867
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.6 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (105 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #474,938 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for Hood: '... a fun read that will leave readers anxious for the next installment.' Publisher's Weekly --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Stephen R. Lawhead is an internationally acclaimed author of mythic history and imaginative fiction. He is the author of such epics as The King Raven, Song of Albion, and Dragon King Trilogies. Lawhead makes his home in Oxford, England, with his wife. Twitter: @StephenLawhead Facebook: StephenRLawhead


More About the Author

Stephen R. Lawhead is a multi-award winning author of mythic history and imaginative bestsellers. In over thirty years of professional writing he has established an international reputation and is known for such works as the King Raven trilogy, a re-telling of the Robin Hood legend; and the Pendragon Cycle, an historic retelling of the King Arthur legend.

Other notable works include the fantasy trilogies The Song of Albion, and the Dragon King Trilogies -- as well as the historical works Byzantium, Patrick, Avalon, and the works of science-fiction Dream Thief and Empyrion saga, and his latest, the five-book series Bright Empires. Lawhead makes his home in Oxford, England, with his wife.

You can find out more by visiting www.stephenlawhead.com

Customer Reviews

This story has kept me on the edge of my seat.
True
Scarlet is the second book in Stephen Lawhead's "King Raven" trilogy, which is his re-telling of the classic Robin Hood saga.
Gregory P. Hoadley
The easy to read style and the unique character of Lawhead's writing make this a most enjoyable read.
Martin Melvin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Eric Wilson TOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
If you're a Stephen Lawhead fan, you need to catch his spin on the classic Robin Hood tale. Obviously, he gives it his own historic ambiance, exploring old and new ideas with respect, but without rigidity. If you're not a Lawhead fan...Time to join the bandwagon! Since the Pendragon Cycle and the Song of Albion series, he has consistently given us entertaining and intelligent stories. "Hood" and "Scarlet" only add to his impressive resume.

While last year's "Hood" followed the origins of Lawhead's Welsh Rhi Bran Hud, "Scarlet" takes us into the life of Will Scarlet. From the first page, Lawhead establishes a wonderful character with a literary voice that's consistent, lyrical, and captivating. Will is in prison, awaiting his own hanging. In the meantime, he dictates his story of meeting and pledging fealty to Bran, King Raven. We see wonderful glimpses into medieval life. We become entwined in the political/religious intrigues of the day, and we meet new heroes and villains. From Will's initial archery contest with Bran, to his gallows day, Lawhead wields his pen with attention to detail, character, and plot.

"Scarlet" meanders into a fascinating tale, gives us some romance and action, then ends with a cliffhanger, a perfect bridge into the final book, titled "Tuck." Lawhead is having fun with this trilogy and, to the delight of his readers, it shows.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Jacob on November 11, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I won't tell about the story line because that wouldn't be fair to the reader. I won't ruin it for you. But about the book itself, its style and flow. This book is so much better than *Hood.* The storyline is crisper, its characters so much more mature, and the dialouge is cleare.

The romance is among Lawhead's better renditions. I do fear that some of Lawhead's works tended to repeat themselves (this was especially true in the Pendragon Cycle). Here, the romance is more sensible and realistic. I particularly enjoyed the interplay between Will and Noin. Also, the back and forth between Merian and Bran is better done than in Hood.

I definitely recommend this work as one of Lawhead's more mature writings. Also, be sure to find the soundtrack that goes with it. There is an official King Raven Trilogy soundtrack. Go to Itunes and type in Brian Dunning and Jeff Johnson.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Higgy on October 8, 2007
Format: Hardcover
It's too bad that TUCK has been delayed but at least it isn't altogether canceled. I hope Lawhead makes a full recovery or as full a recovery as nature will allow.

When I read HOOD I have to admit that I began it fully expecting to take in the story with a grain of salt. I was pleasantly surprised that Lawhead could re-imagine the story of Robin Hood and convey his image in a manner that captured me in the first chapter. SCARLET is a sequel that does not disappoint. The character development was flawless and I could feel myself emphathizing with Will "Scarlet" Scatlocke and at least relating with the Sheriff (but not quite empathizing).

The thing I found greatest about this book was that while it's still a story about Robin Hood, it is mostly related as narrative by Will Scatlocke and Will plays as the central character.

Both HOOD and SCARLET are great novels for those interested in a more grown-up version of the story of Robin Hood as well as those that enjoy historical fiction (although I cannot vouch for how historically accurate/inaccurate the books are). They are reminiscent of Mary Stewart's MERLIN TRILOGY in that both sets of books relate fantastic tales of seemingly far-fetched accounts that may or may not have occurred in a manner that, at the least, makes the stories plausible.

These KING RAVEN novels are the first novels I've read by Stephen R. Lawhead so I'm not giving my review based from the standpoint of someone who loves all things Lawhead. Having said, if TUCK is as great as the first two novels in this series, I may become a Lawhead fan after all.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By N. C. Smith on November 17, 2007
Format: Hardcover
After Hood, I had a difficult time getting used to the narrative voice of William Scatlocke. This alone may be what had me torn between rating this with three stars or four. Though I had to admit to myself that by the end of the book I had come to like our character Will quite well, if I don't give this tome a three-star rating, I will have no room in the future to identify the stories I truly, truly enjoyed. (Hood was a four, for me.)

Compared to Hood, which was a fine book, I thought the plot of Scarlet slow-paced. The book begins with Will in prison, scheduled to hang. It is this crisis and it's resolution that, I believe, the author intended to keep the reader on the edge of their seat while the 'main' storyline around Bran's effort to free Elfael from the Ffreinc unfolded. However, if like me, you don't buy the threat of Will's imminent demise, you'll depend on the tale he tells to keep you excited and, as I said, that story takes a long time to warm up. In fact, it's not until some 300 pages into the book until a new plan (the first plan being that which unfolded in Hood) is hatched to free Elfael - freeing Elfael being the primary motivation for all of Bran's band to begin with.

One thing Scarlet does better than Hood is portray for us the true villainy of the Ffreinc. In Hood, yes, they were the bad-guys, but more or less not really more ruthless than the Britons, just on the opposing side. A scene where the Marshall Guy and his men cruelly slaughter a farmer's livelihood, and later where the Sherriff of the March hangs that very same farmer with no mercy (and still later tries to hang three more innocent victims) goes a long way to giving the readers someone to really root _against_.
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