The Scarlet Letter and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Scarlet Letter (Saddl... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This is a very good copy with slight wear and does not include a dust jacket;
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Scarlet Letter (Saddleback Illustrated Classics) Paperback – January 1, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1562549367 ISBN-10: 1562549367

Buy New
Price: $9.95
24 New from $4.01 24 Used from $0.01
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, January 1, 2007
$9.95
$4.01 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime
$9.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Scarlet Letter (Saddleback Illustrated Classics) + The Great Gatsby + Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Price for all three: $23.00

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle FreeTime Unlimited
Free one month trial
Get unlimited access to thousands of kid-safe books, apps and videos, for one low price, with Amazon FreeTime Unlimited. Get started for free. Learn more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 640L (What's this?)
  • Series: Saddleback Illustrated Classics
  • Paperback: 70 pages
  • Publisher: Saddleback Educational Publishing (January 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1562549367
  • ISBN-13: 978-1562549367
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,455 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,349,859 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 8 Up-Actress Elizabeth McGovern reads this acceptable abridgement with precise, clear diction. Her expressive voice is pleasant, effectively using breath sounds and pauses to recreate dramatic moods. Her usually quick tempo keeps the text from being ponderous, but it can be slower when necessary. Given the time period of the original work, her formal tone is appropriate. Her speech changes slightly for the different characters, but there is not much dialogue. The abridgement retains the continuity of the story. Consider purchasing this version for special education students who can't handle the longer, original text.-Claudia Moore, W.T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Review

Novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in 1850. It is considered a masterpiece of American literature and a classic moral study. The novel is set in a village in Puritan New England. The main character is Hester Prynne, a young woman who has borne an illegitimate child. Hester believes herself a widow, but her husband, Roger Chillingworth, returns to New England very much alive and conceals his identity. He finds his wife forced to wear the scarlet letter A on her dress as punishment for her adultery. Chillingworth becomes obsessed with finding the identity of his wife's former lover. When he learns that the father of Hester's child is Arthur Dimmesdale, a saintly young minister who is the leader of those exhorting her to name the child's father, Chillingworth proceeds to torment the guilt-stricken young man. In the end Chillingworth is morally degraded by his monomaniacal pursuit of revenge; Dimmesdale is broken by his own sense of guilt, and he publicly confesses his adultery before dying in Hester's arms. Only Hester can face the future bravely, as she plans to take her daughter Pearl to Europe to begin a new life. --The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

"The Scarlet Letter" by N. Hawthorne.
Hemry Prairie
The truths about evil, lies, love, beauty, courage and the heroism of the human spirit which can not only survive, but endure for generations.
Adam Stephanus
I DID "get" this book, in that I understood it, but there was a lack of an interesting plot and characters for whom you could care.
Tony Nowinski

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

152 of 176 people found the following review helpful By Srinivas Chetty on November 5, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have long wanted to read this book by Nathaniel Hawthorne. It was one of the first books I downloaded when I got my kindle 2. The character portrayals are superb. It analyses the thoughts, motivations, strengths and weaknesses of the four major characters in the story - Hester Prynn, the vengeful doctor, the hapless minister and Hester's vivacious and elf-like daughter Pearl. The description of the little girl and how she copes with being ostracized with her mother by a rigid puritanical society, is especially moving. While there are some descriptions of nature that are quite vivid, most of the text goes into developing these four characters and is a fascinating psychological study, though at times it's little slow.

Overall, a well-crafted story and a good read.

The book though is hard to navigate on the kindle because it has no active table of contents. I therefore would not purchase this version at regular price. Luckily, it's free!
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Alesha N. Gates on May 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
There are so many things I could say about this book, but should I reach the heights of elegance achieved only by Shakespeare, Hawthorne himself, or Faulkner, I could not overcome the horrible, terrible misconceptions most people have formed after having this beautiful novel foisted upon them in high school. Instead, I'll share a few observations and some tips for reading.

First, this is a complicated story. It's not about evil Puritans and hero Hester, although you will read this point of view in the cheat note summaries on the internet. It's not about feminism, really, nor is it about religion in any technical sense. The only comparison that really fits is that of love story, or love triangle, or maybe love square. (I told you it is complicated.) In all of literature, there are very few writers who have penned characters so incredibly real and well-rounded. When you finish the novel, you KNOW these people. Certainly there is some minor societal commentary, but the real story here is about these people.

Now, I'm assuming that many people looking at this page have been told they must read this book for high school English. As a former teacher of said subject, I have some pointers.

(1) Make sure you read the book for yourself. Chances are (in our current educational system) your teacher is going to have a flat interpretation of this book, likely gleaned from some ready-made teaching packet. (If you have another kind of teacher, consider yourself lucky.) You can have some very interesting class discussions if you actually read the material and challenge some of the majority opinions about the novel. Be a rebel. Have some fun in English.

(2) Read *The Custom House* introduction, but wait until after you've finished the book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
198 of 239 people found the following review helpful By D. Bass on September 6, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Like many reviewers here, I was "forced" to read this book for my English Composition class. However, unlike many reviewers here, I have a much different view of the story. As some people have said before, Hawthorne's book takes a good deal of concentration, effort, and strength to understand. Not only to understand, but to finish. The story can drag sometimes, it is true, and Hawthorne's style of writing occasionally leaves something to be desired (I don't think I've ever seen that many commas, 15 letter words, or page long paragraphs before), but we simply must look past these minor issues. Overall, the plot is highly creative and intense, despite the writing.\
Ok, ok, I agree that the first chapter, "The Custom-House", was pretty bad. In fact, it was so bad and boring that I drifted off to sleep several times while reading it! The first chapter has little relevancy with the story, so, unless you have to, I would suggest skipping that part of the text. The rest is exceptionally good, and the quality of the plot cannot be overlooked. My advice is to just lay off the first chapter; that way you'll be able to enjoy the rest of the book without difficulty.
The story itself deals with sin and adultery, a subject that isn't very popular right now. Hawthorne does an excellent job of telling us about this, but he leaves the reader with many questions floating around in his mind at the conclusion. At the end of the story you're not 100% sure if Hawthorne was condemning the Puritan society, or if he was commending it. He leaves that for the reader to figure out, which is a thing authors seldom do. That's a major reason I believe this work is so unique and timeless.
Read more ›
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mary Lois Timbes on September 30, 2013
Format: Paperback
In case you're put off by old-fashioned, elegant writing, and this aversion has kept you from approaching the classics, let's look at The Scarlet Letter from a more modern viewpoint.

Hester and Arthur had a little roll in the hay at some point. In the 1600's in Boston this was a grave sin, since she had thrown her lot in with an old coot back in England years before. Her mistake, as we would see it today, was marrying the wrong guy in the first place. But the biggie in the eye of society of the day is that she has a baby in her arms and no husband in sight.

We meet Hester in the height of her infamy, as she stands on the scaffold in the center of the town square in her somber dress emblazoned with a glittering red "A" emblazoned on the breast, for all to gaze at and judge. A is for Adultery, as Sue Grafton might say, but Nathaniel Hawthorne, in centuries past, titled his masterpiece The Scarlet Letter. This is where our book begins, and from the minute we meet her we sympathize with Hester, even without the turn of centuries--we want her down from that platform and, if possible, in the arms of the right man.

Required to wear that "A" in her daily life from then on, Hester does her best to support the youngster, who is extraordinary by any standards. She names her Pearl, as the lass was acquired at great price, and Pearl glistens through this tale, all-seeing and perhaps all-knowing. Hester adores the child but is perplexed at being a single parent of a magical sprite. The coot-husband enters the picture, bent on revenge against his perceived rival, and, assuming a new name and identity, works his way into Arthur's confidence with a plot to destroy him.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?