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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One person can make a difference...
I first read about Jackson Kaguri and the Nyaka school for AIDS orphans in an article in Time Magazine. In a world of sad and depressing news, it was so inspiring to read that one person can make a difference and start a movement to help the often forgotten victims of the AIDS epidemic, the orphans left behind. Kaguri speaks from heart breaking experience, having lost...
Published on June 28, 2010 by V. Baker

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Reqiuired reading
I actually got this book for my daughter. It was a little difficult to follow sometimes. An interesting idea though
Published 16 months ago by Stephi


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One person can make a difference..., June 28, 2010
By 
V. Baker (Eaton Rapids, Michigan USA) - See all my reviews
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I first read about Jackson Kaguri and the Nyaka school for AIDS orphans in an article in Time Magazine. In a world of sad and depressing news, it was so inspiring to read that one person can make a difference and start a movement to help the often forgotten victims of the AIDS epidemic, the orphans left behind. Kaguri speaks from heart breaking experience, having lost both his brother and sister to the disease. He had achieved the "dream" through his love of education. He had gone to school in Africa and came to America to finish his college career. He met the love of his life, they were married and starting to save money for a down payment for their first home. He then became responsible for his nieces and nephews left behind after his siblings' deaths. He then began to think of all the other AIDS orphans left behind who were not always fortunate enough to have someone to care for them. A system of grandmothers who had raised their own children have now watched their grown children die and are raising their grandchildren. At first there were people who told Kaguri not to worry about it, that there was nothing he could do, but slowly there came together another group of people who joined his cause.

I read this book in two day's time and have gone on to loan it to a friend. This is the type of book that you will want to share with others.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An incredible and inspiring book., June 19, 2010
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This is first time I have been moved to write a review. Twesigye Kaguri's book is an incredible story of how he came to build schools in his home country of Uganda for AIDS orphans. His journey has been difficult but what he has accomplished is truly amazing. His story will make you want to do everything you can to help.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Price of Stones -- how a dedicated band brought a school to life, June 24, 2010
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This is an inspiring tale of how a small group of people, against great odds, brought education and hope to the lives of AIDS orphans in rural Uganda. Intertwined with the story of the school is an account of the author's childhood in the small village of Nyakagyezi.

The book brings home the scale of the devastation wrought by the AIDS pandemic in Africa. It shows the challenges involved in obtaining basic necessities, such as pure water and medical care, in a remote third-world community. Larger social issues aside, the book paints a fascinating picture of life in Uganda and African-style family dynamics.

The Kaguris and their colleagues could see what needed to be done for the many AIDS orphans in their community. The remarkable thing is that they went ahead and did it, undeterred by the difficulty of building a school and sustaining it over the long term. The world would be a much better place if everyone showed this kind of commitment to larger social needs.

The founding of the Nyaka school was a magnificent achievement. I find the stories of the students to be very inspiring as well. With all they have had to endure, these children really seem to value their opportunity to learn. This book should be required reading for every U.S. student who takes his education for granted!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Out of despair comes hope, June 22, 2010
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Uganda native Kaguri's drive and determination were front and center from an early age. His memoir of growing up the youngest of five in a rural village without electricity or a water system is driven from the start by his desire for education. As a child of five he followed his older sisters to school more than once, trying to get into the classroom, although he knew he would be in trouble later.

His father was a hard, but fairly prosperous man in their poor village and while he sent his children to school, his view of education was not nearly as all encompassing as his son's. From soccer games to a room of his own to leaving home for university, and then America, Kaguri used a mix of subterfuge, evasion and outright defiance to get around the obstacle of his father.

But it was AIDs and his older brother Frank who set him on the path that became his passion and life's work. Frank had gone to the city and came home every Christmas bearing gifts and largesse. "You do what you can, little brother," he told Kaguri, "God knows we can't provide for everyone."

Kaguri was aware of the disease called Slim that claimed so many in his country while he was growing up, but as he prepared to depart for America it had yet touched no one in his family. Frank was the first to die. Then his older sister. Then her baby.

When Kaguri brought his American wife to his home village, he felt a helpless despair at the impoverished orphans everywhere, most in the care of grandparents too old for the job, others homeless. He knew, as he had always known, that the only way out was education.

The idea of a free school passed through his mind, but it was his wife who helped him believe it was doable. How they made it happen - and how it grew - is a tale of indefatigable achievement and individual stories. There are triumphs and failures, death and birth.

Kaguri's story is simply told. He brings us into his family - his difficult, sometimes violent father, and gentle, supportive, mother - and his village - the poverty, hunger and love, the landscape and dangers, the people, the children. Kaguri's story is inspiring, but far from over.

As the school showed some success, demands came for more - clean water so the children could live to reap the benefits of education, health care, life skills, vocational training and more. Kaguri clearly hopes to build more support with this book and readers will wish him success.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A little education, please., July 14, 2010
So much suffering goes on in our world and we are usually ignorant of most of it. Reading this remarkable story has encouraged me to make sure our children know they can make changes for good where others are suffering. Well written, Jackson's book includes stories of his childhood that illustrate how he became a man who would sacrifice so much for the sake of others in his village. While this book does paint a vivid picture of the plight of AIDS victims and orphans in Uganda, the author balances the suffering with stories of hope and achievement, emphasizing how drastically an education can change one's life. Highly, highly recommended.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Price of Stones, June 12, 2010
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This is a remarkedly well written story of a remarkable young man, his life, his dreams, and his accomplishments. It presents a really detailed picture of his home, his family, his raising, the grief of the AIDS epidemic and his long journey to create a school, constantly looking for money and finding helpful people. His ideas are ones that could and should be used in many parts of the world. Along he way working to increase his own education and take care of his family. Excellent and exciting details.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Aiding AIDS Victims, July 5, 2010
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If you have ever wondered what you could do to alleviate the suffering produced by the AIDS virus, this book will not only increase your desire, but also give several means for helping AIDS orphans in Uganda.Twesigye Jackson Kageiri, native Ugandan, returns to visit his family and discovers that AIDS orphans in his region, although usually taken in by some family member, have no school. Therefore, they will not be able to care for themselves or provide livings as they mature. His decision to build a school is the first step, but not the last.
The author's use of current events interspersed with flashbacks in his own life make for intriguing and motivating reading. It's even possible to get directions for knitting or crocheting "comfort" dolls, allowing the reader to help in a practical way.

I usually read at least a book a week, but I couldn't put this one down!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nothing Is Impossible, June 30, 2010
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Having the pleasure of knowing Jackson for a number of years, I was delighted to hear that his story was being published. This is the story of a man who gave (and continues to give) his all to help those who have no other help. Every chapter has it own life lesson, and we can all learn a lot from his caring and compassion. Jackson has done the seemingly impossible in creating schools for Aids orphans in the villages of Nyakagezi and Kutamba in Uganda, as well as providing his village with clean water and a library. This book teaches us that once we set our mind to something and have the passion for it, nothing is impossible.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very inspiring, July 25, 2010
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Peggy (San Francisco) - See all my reviews
I wish I had known about this effort earlier. It is so inspiring to see how the Kaguris and their colleagues could see what needed to be done for the many AIDS orphans in their community. Not only they had the vision but they strike to build a sustainable mode. Thank you for writing your story and inspiring all of us.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, August 31, 2011
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This review is from: A School for My Village: A Promise to the Orphans of Nyaka (Paperback)
This book is amazing. Very inspiring and down to earth. The book is a very fast read, less than a day. I recommend this book to anyone. It is worth the money and you feel really good after reading it and also want to help and make a difference for the AIDS orphans in Uganda.
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A School for My Village: A Promise to the Orphans of Nyaka
A School for My Village: A Promise to the Orphans of Nyaka by Twesigye Jackson Kaguri (Paperback - April 26, 2011)
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