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  • Schubert: Piano Trio in B-flat, Op. 99 (D.898) / Adagio [Notturno] in E-flat, Op. posth. 148 (D.897) / Allegro in B-flat (D.28) - The Mozartean Players
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Schubert: Piano Trio in B-flat, Op. 99 (D.898) / Adagio [Notturno] in E-flat, Op. posth. 148 (D.897) / Allegro in B-flat (D.28) - The Mozartean Players Import


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Audio CD, Import, December 7, 1993
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Product Details

  • Performer: Steven Lubin, Stanley Ritchie, Myron Lutzke
  • Composer: Franz Schubert
  • Audio CD (December 7, 1993)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Harmonia Mundi France
  • ASIN: B0000007DT
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #668,138 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Pno Trio in B-Flat, Op.99 (D.898): I. Allegro Moderato
2. Pno Trio in B-Flat, Op.99 (D.898): II. Andante Un Poco Mosso
3. Pno Trio in B-Flat, Op.99 (D.898): III. Scherzo: Allegro
4. Pno Trio in B-Flat, Op.99 (D.898): IV. Rondo: Allegro Vivace
5. Adagio (Notturno) in E-Flat, Op. Posth. 148 (D.897)
6. Allegro (Sonatensatz) in B-flat (D.28)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 22, 2003
I was shocked to read the previous, blatantly negative review posted here! I've spent most of my life in classical music, performing chamber music, and Schubert is one of my favorite composers of all time. Thus, I know his trios like the back of my hand, and I find myself listening to other artists' renditions often. I found this recording by the Mozartean Players (along with their recording of Opus 100) to be one of my favorites -- at turns bold and brilliant, refined and understated, playful and joyful, the way Schubert is meant to be.
The interplay between Lubin, Ritchie and Lutzke is marvelous. And when you hear those gorgeous melody lines soar, it'll make your heart ache. I couldn't recommend this CD more highly!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Valerie J. Kraemer on April 27, 2008
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This recording is not for the faint of heart. From the very first it thrusts the listener into the aquarium interior. Everything that is disturbing about Schubert is magnified and even more disturbing than ever.

Before discussing what it exactly is about the Graf piano and the classical string, allow me to make a comparison. When Schubert arranges his musical ideas in a trio, he begins to reach for a multimedia effect, much like visiting a painting by Michel Leah Keck--also known as "The Raw Artist"--who through a contempory sectionalism of bold patches
and calculated drizzles, brings radience and fear into our emotional state as a combined force. The Opus 99 [D898] is a case in point, presented here as an in-your-face montage of nearly disjointed partitions which irrigate one's aesthetic spine almost to the limit of tolerance. But don't blame the performers. Praise them to the skies. Schubert in all his greatness wants us to be alive and to disturb us with what amounts to an abstract product constructed of awkwardly joined conventional truisms which jump out of us with an almost violent starkness. Where modern instruments rely on platitudes to carry the day, the darker timbre of the Graf piano--this carefully engineered and handled btw--gives us the deep browns and the sharp angles. For sunlight, there are the interminglings of the violin and cello, both notably transparent and played somewhat deliberately to bring this out for us and also for the enjoyment of the musicians, I think. All of this is intimately recorded so that one wonders how these three ever managed to play all this without breathing.
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Melvyn M. Sobel on December 13, 2002
In my review of 23 October 2000, I found the Mozartean's performance of the Schubert Op. 100 wanting in nuance, depth and feeling, all enhanced by particularly poor sound quality and the use of historical instruments. If possible, the Op. 99, here, fares no better and, in many ways, seems even more superficial, routine and annoying. Not even the inclusion of the berceuse-like Adagio (Notturno) in E-flat, nor the exhilarating Allegro in B-flat, both shorn of their burnished warmth, improves matters in the least. A most disappointing issue on all counts.
[Running time: 59:43]
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