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The Science and Engineering of Materials Hardcover – June 21, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0495296027 ISBN-10: 0495296023 Edition: 6th

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 944 pages
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning; 6 edition (June 21, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0495296023
  • ISBN-13: 978-0495296027
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 8.1 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #89,911 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Donald R. Askeland joined the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1970 after obtaining his doctorate in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Michigan. His primary interest has been in teaching, resulting in a variety of campus, university, and industry awards and the preparation of a materials engineering textbook. Dr. Askeland has also been active in research involving metals casting and metals joining, particularly in the production, treatment, and joining of cast irons, gating and fluidity of aluminum alloys, and optimization of casting processes. Additional work has concentrated on lost foam casting, permanent mold casting, and investment casting; much of this work has been interdisciplinary, providing data for creating computer models and validation of such models.

Pradeep P. Fulay received his Ph.D. from the University of Arizona and teaches at the University of Pittsburgh. His research is primarily concerned with the synthesis and processing of ceramic powders and thin films, consisting of nano-sized primary particles/grains. His current research involves development of novel synthesis and processing protocols for electro-optic and ferroelectric ceramics and studies related to the relationships between their microstructure and dielectric/optical properties. Dr. Fulay is also researching fundamental of magnetorheological (MR) fluids. He is a Fellow to the American Ceramic Society.

Wendelin Wright is an associate professor at Bucknell University with a joint appointment in the departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemical Engineering. She received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. (2003) in Materials Science and Engineering from Stanford University. Following graduation, she served a post-doctoral term at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the Manufacturing and Materials Engineering Division and then returned to Stanford as an Acting Assistant Professor in 2005. She joined the Santa Clara University faculty as a tenure-track assistant professor and assumed her position at Bucknell in the fall of 2010. Professor Wright's research interests focus on the mechanical behavior of materials, particularly of metallic glasses. She is the recipient of the 2003 Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, which is Stanford University's highest teaching honor, a 2005 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and a 2010 National Science Foundation CAREER Award. Professor Wright is a licensed professional engineer in metallurgy in California.

Customer Reviews

Too bad too, my profs were rather fond of Ashby.
Chris Jackson
The book did not provide adequate reasoning behind the formation of Diamond centered cubic structures, of importance when dealing with ceramic materials.
Greg Freeman
The book was brand new and still in shrink wrap.
V. Tremblay

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I just completed a course in materials science using the 4th edition and have been appalled by the poor quality of the book (spiffy cover artwork aside).
The book is full of generalizations that impart no significant understanding of the topics treated. Commonly, the book will simply assert that X causes Y without any physical justification as to WHY. Illustratively, when the book touches upon atomic structure, it uses a figure depicting the Bohr model of the atom without any reference to this being a simplification, nor any reference to the "actual" character of atomic orbitals.
Additionally, the book is rife with poorly worded problems which are accompanied by answers that seeminly have no correspondence to their respective problems. I did not do a single problem set from the book without finding at least one problem where the answer was just plain wrong. A particularly amusing instance was the assignment of units of area to a dimensionless answer (and NO, the quantity wasn't right, either).
STAY FAR AWAY FROM THIS BOOK.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas R. Tebbe on November 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Enjoy the speling errors and, gramatical misstakes on allmost evry, pages. One would suppose after four editions all such errors would have been annihilated. Maybe the mistakes are meant to maintain the reader's vigilance. Perhaps the typos exist so that one day edition 6 might also.
It is worth noting, for the reader's insight, that in this edition the author(s) employ the use--or perhaps we should say the "overuse"--of the English language to generate many sentences for the purpose of yielding simple concepts to the reader, though certainly a few words would suffice. The book is, in a word, wordy.
Perhaps this is enough to warrant a grade of one star. In the book's defense, however, the pictures are quite nice... when they happen to be accurate. After noticing glaring truth deficiencies in a few graphs and formulas it becomes difficult to simply accept all of the quite nice pictures as definitive law, though they are certainly enjoyable for aesthetic purposes.
To summarize, the book is not recommended for purchasing purposes unless unavoidable. Though the text possesses some merit in its ability to sharpen one's editing skills, that is no reason to spend what textbooks cost.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Arthem on April 26, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The primary feature of Askeland's text is in the speed with which its sections can be read. Unfortunately, this is due to the lack of necessary detail. Difficult concepts are often glossed over, while simpler topics receive undue attention. The example problems don't seem as relevant as they might be, and certainly bear more strongly on the author's skills than on the student's.
I may be unfairly comparing this book with Callister's "Materials Science and Engineering," but given the choice of either as a reference source, I would hesitate to choose Askeland. If you are stuck with the Askeland text for a course, but really need to understand material behavior, then invest in the Callister book as a backup - it will greatly enhance your understanding.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 3, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book covers the brosd spectrum of material science one would expect from an intro level materials class. The book is not valuable as a reference because it has a poor index. The chapter review questions on design are very vague and open ended. If you are looking for a reference book, look elswhere. If you need this for a class then I hope you have a good teacher.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Chris Jackson on August 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Compared to Callister and Ashby, and here's why.
I agree with arthem, that this book doesn't go into enough detail for the person that wants to know "why". But it's not supposed to. It is by no means a chemistry book, so you have to have a SOLID chemistry background/understanding/feeling or you might have a hard time. It takes more of the "cookbook", need-to-know, macroscopic approach, whereas Callister is more of the theory. My first materials course used the Askeland book, and the third used Callister, and I found it effective to get the overview, then go into the "why" details later. My TA's and Prof's hated Askeland's style, but I don't think they appreciated what it brought to the table....understanding. Understand the concept (i.e. more carbon makes steel stronger), then learn why.
Either of them are better than Ashby. I'd write a review on Ashby's books, but that means to be fair I'd have to dig them out, and I'm hoping rats ate them. Too bad too, my profs were rather fond of Ashby.
I have to reserve a star for this book, because with a little more info it would be that much better. That, and I remember as a student, the problems were tough, tougher than the text prepared you for.
Which reminds me, my exam questions frequently came out of this text in subsequent classes. Ironic since the prof's hated this book. hmm.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This text is written in a reasonably straight forward style that simplifies understanding some of the concepts explained. I especially enjoyed the chapters on solidification strengthening and polymers.
I did have a difficult time finding specific subjects using the index. Compared to the volume of subject matter the index is very small, with typically only 1 referenced page per item. There are several subjects that are explained several different ways, but to find each explanation requires searching through the chapters. this make the book less useful for reading desired material.
In general this is an acceptable text book and would be useful for introductory materials classes.
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