Engineering & Transportation
The New Science of Strong Materials: Or Why You Don't Fal... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.95
  • Save: $5.96 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by worldofbooksusa
Condition: Used: Good
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $4.46
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The New Science of Strong Materials or Why You Don't Fall through the Floor (Princeton Science Library) Paperback – February 19, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0691125480 ISBN-10: 0691125481 Edition: Revised

Buy New
Price: $20.99
23 New from $15.98 20 Used from $11.72
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$25.00
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.99
$15.98 $11.72
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The New Science of Strong Materials or Why You Don't Fall through the Floor (Princeton Science Library) + Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down
Price for both: $35.76

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Princeton Science Library
  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; Revised edition (February 19, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691125481
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691125480
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #164,532 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"I was thoroughly charmed and won over by this book which I now recommend to all my colleagues."--Daniel C. Mattis, American Journal of Physics



Praise for Princeton's original edition: "Princeton has brought to the public a highly readable treatise on the science of materials that emphasizes the strength of chemical and physical bonds, crystal structure, and cracks. . . . The author admits the necessity of being highly selective in the materials he can discuss so broadly, but he ably presents chemical and physical problems and how they have been solved in an orderly fashion, and he shows that the strength of materials is influenced as much by their environment and loading systems as by their own structures and shapes."--S. W. Dobyns, Science Books and Films

From the Back Cover


Praise for Princeton's original edition: "I found Gordon's writing style fascinating; his book reads like a novel, and the technical content is superb."--Enoch J. Durbin, Princeton University



More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
19
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 21 customer reviews
The concepts are very clear and is like read a novel.-
Rodolfok
There's much to be said for reading both books, but if you're only going to read one, "Structures" is the one.
Diego Banducci
This book should be required reading for all undergraduates, not just aspiring scientists or engineers.
Barry C. Chow

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Barry C. Chow on October 23, 2001
Format: Paperback
Professor Gordon is the sort of teacher I would have appreciated in school. One imagines him as a grey haired gentleman in rumpled slacks and cardigan with a pipe and sneakers who makes it his kindly mission in life to fill his students with a zest for his chosen calling.
His explanations are elegant, simple and fascinating. I can't think of higher praise for someone trying to make sense of a discipline as complicated as materials science.
The problem with most academics is an inherent need to appear learned. This leads to obscure and convoluted explanations that are, if not overtly, at least subconsciously designed to maintain the gap between the ignorant masses and the enlightened adepts. Even when such academics make a conscious attempt to simplify, their efforts are too often sabotaged by the bad habits of a lifetime.
This is why good popularisers are so difficult to come by, and why the Gordons of the world should be so prized.
This book isn't just about the science of materials, but about how such an exotic subject actually connects with our everyday lives. We live in a certain way, and not in a different way, because of the strengths, weaknesses, costs and working difficulties in the materials that we use. I don't think most laymen ever bother thinking about the world in quite this way.
This book is not actually meant for engineers or scientists, although most such technos would greatly benefit from reading it (if only to learn the meaning of true grasp and clarity). Its true benefit is to those curious laymen who wish to know more, but who find the usual explanations beyond them.
This book should be required reading for all undergraduates, not just aspiring scientists or engineers. In fact, it should be especially required for non-technical types.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Diego Banducci on July 10, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is part of the Princeton Science Library, the best collection of books on mathematics and science for the intelligent layman. Like other books in that series, it is succinct and clearly written. I read it and thoroughly enjoyed it. All of the positive reader reviews are right on.

Because I liked it so much, I purchased Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down also by Professor Gordon. As it turned out, that book covers the same material, but in greater breadth and depth, and with more illustrations. There's much to be said for reading both books, but if you're only going to read one, "Structures" is the one.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 17, 1998
Format: Paperback
Far more than a textbook intro, it is a biographical narrative of the discovery of why some materials are strong, some not; how wooden airplanes were made in WWI and I, how plastics were found to be strong, or not, why fiber composites, such as fibreglass, were found to be so strong. Immensely entertaining, very educational .
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By malcolm_sharp@ist.instron.com on September 29, 1997
Format: Paperback
This book, and it's companion, "Structures, or why things don't fall down" should be standard reading material for every engineering undergraduate. Mr. Gordon is the only author I've found that has a real practical insight into these arcane areas of science. The reason I've ordered two more of each title is that my orignal copies have fallen apart from being read and re-read by myself and others for continued education and enjoyment. You can't say that about many other science related textbooks!
I'm just happy to see they are still in print.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is an absolutely wonderful book. It is fun to read the practical examples and has unusual technical insight into how materials fail (or don't). Some very technical ideas are presented very simplely and clearly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John Gale on October 14, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Author James Gordon has that special gift of passionately imparting sound knowledge succintly and with a refreshing sense of British humour. Where was he when I was studying physics? This book is an excellent summary for anyone studying engineering, too. I had already read his other book "Structures - or why things don't fall down" and I would recommend this also, though the contents naturally overlap a little. Two classics - get Amazon to have them both on your shelf.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Elisabeth G. Thibodeau on November 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
Good text for fracture mechanics enthusiasts- material failure, strength of materials.

Good reading, if you are an engineer, scientist, or not. Great examples. Dry british writing, but if you can get through it and the silly jokes, you can learn a lot.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robin Hoare on September 10, 2009
Format: Paperback
Though this book was written some time ago I think it should be essential background reading for all teachers of science and engineering.
The writer has a real gift of making quite difficult subjects interesting, and with humourous though relevant asides. Professor Gordon had wide experience in many fields and this shows... even people with no mathematical knowledge can read with profit.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews