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Science Next: Innovation for the Common Good from the Center for American Progress Paperback – April 1, 2009


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Bioethics professor Moreno (Mind Wars: Brain Research and National Defense) and science reporter Weiss, both of the Center for American Progress, have compiled a compact volume exploring the status and future of many hot topics in science and public policy today, which should leave readers appalled at the past eight years and hopeful for the next. Despite subsidized Big Oil, infrastructure collapse, food inspection system failures and ever worsening wildfires, this volume brings hope into focus with reports of innovation that will enhance lives, from caregivers to those running out of fresh water, from No Child Left Behind to university research. Concise, informative contributions include internet co-creator Vinton Cerf on why the U.S. should respond to climate change like it did to Sputnik, and CAP senior fellow Rick Weiss proclaiming bluntly that "federal tax dollars should not be supporting schools that persist in teaching myths in science classes." There's also numerous recommendations from CAP's 2008 National Innovation Agenda for enhancing the utility, visibility and "sexiness" of science in the U.S.
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About the Author

Editor of Science Progress, the science policy magazine of the Center for American Progress, Moreno is a Professor of Medical Ethics and of the History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities and the author of 10 books including "Mind Wars" and "Undue Risk." Weiss came to CAP from The Washington Post, where he was a science and medical reporter for 15 years. He was the lead reporter at The Post on such controversial issues as cloning and stem cells, agricultural biotechnology, and nanotechnology. He has written articles for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, National Geographic, Science, Discover, and other publications.

More About the Author

See Jonathan's website at wwwjonathandmoreno.com.

Jonathan D. Moreno is one of thirteen Penn Integrates Knowledge university professors at the University of Pennsylvania, holding the David and Lyn Silfen chair. He is also Professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, of History and Sociology of Science, and of Philosophy. In 2008-09 he served as a member of President Barack Obama's transition team.

Moreno is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and is a National Associate of the National Research Council. He has served as a senior staff member for three presidential advisory commissions, including the current bioethics commission under President Obama, and has given invited testimony for both houses of congress. He was an Andrew W. Mellon post doctoral fellow, holds an honorary doctorate from Hofstra University, and is a recipient of the Benjamin Rush Medal from the College of William and Mary Law School.

Moreno is a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress in Washington, DC, where he edits the magazine Science Progress (www.scienceprogress.org). Moreno has served as adviser to many non-governmental organizations, including the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He is a member of the Governing Board of the International Neuroethics Society, a Faculty Affiliate of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University, a Fellow of the Hastings Center and the New York Academy of Medicine, and a past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. He advises various science, health, and national security agencies and serves as a member of the Defense Intelligence Agency's TIGER committee on potentially disruptive novel technologies.

Kirkus Reviews said that Moreno's new book, The Body Politic: "illuminates intricate threads of history and complex philosophical arguments. Patient general readers, as well as scholars and students of bioethics, will benefit from Moreno's erudition and fairness...." Publisher's Weekly called it "[a]n important analysis of the societal currents swirling around volatile scientific issues . . . Moreno delivers a powerful defense of science [and] respects his readers' intelligence in this nuanced and thoughtful book." JAMA described Progress in Bioethics (2010) as "provocative and stimulating." Publisher's Weekly said that his book Science Next (2009) "brings hope into focus with reports of innovation that will enhance lives." The journal Nature called Mind Wars: Brain Research and National Defense (2006), "fascinating and sometimes unsettling." The New York Times said that Undue Risk: Secret State Experiments on Humans (1999) was "an earnest and chilling account." His other books include Ethical Guidelines for Innovative Surgery (2006); Is There an Ethicist in the House? (2005); In the Wake of Terror: Medicine and Morality in a Time of Crisis (2003); Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research (2003); Deciding Together: Bioethics and Moral Consensus (1995); Ethics in Clinical Practice (2000); and Arguing Euthanasia (1995). Moreno has published about 300 papers, reviews and book chapters, and is a member of several editorial boards.

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