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Science Plus, 1997: Technology & Society Hardcover – January, 1997

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Holt Rinehart and Winston (January 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0030950937
  • ISBN-13: 978-0030950933
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,582,995 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By beanandzeus on September 21, 2011
I vehemently disagree with the other reviewer. First about "constructivism":

Constructivism is not a passing fad, it is a well-supported explanation of how people learn new concepts. The tenets of constructivism are that 1) students come to your class with prior knowledge and experiences about concepts and 2) that students brains must act upon new experiences and information in way that both connects with their existing cognitive frameworks and allows them to construct new understandings about a topic. This is what "learning" is. The cognitive frameworks your own brain has connected upon sensory input about a phenomenon.

The implications of constructivism are that teachers should
1) activate students' brains to get them to think about a concept, then
2) provide active experiences with phenomena relevant to the concept, all the while asking them to observe/compare/contrast/make conclusions/give rationales, followed by
3) having students apply their new learning to new situations and problems, and lastly
4) having them summarize and reflect upon what they have learned.

This is the premise of this text book. It includes all parts of the learning cycle, from engage, explore, explain, elaborate, evaluate. this doesn't mean the teacher can't assign primary sources of information or trade books to supplement students content learning after the activities.

A traditional textbook is all about directive learning of content. How much do you remember from the traditional "lectures" your teachers gave in K-12 or college? I guarantee you that most of us remember what we did more that what we heard or read. A traditional textbook CAN be a good resource, but it should not be the primary driver of the science curriculum.

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Verified Purchase
Although I wish we could afford the more up-to-date version, this is a 3-year series we chose for our middle school in East Africa. We were looking for a solid series that promotes good critical thinking and encourages good scientific practices like journal writing and looking to outside sources while covering all the major points of the government's curriculum. The photos and graphics are eye-catching without being eye candy. Supplementary readings in the back Sourcebook extend vocabulary and help students dig more deeply into the topic. Each year includes sections in Biology, Chemistry and Physics for a good integrated approach to the sciences in middle school. I don't know how the first reviewer wants to teach, but for me this is an engaging series with scientifically relevant and rigorous curriculum for this age group.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sandre O on October 25, 2007
This book was part of a series that was part of a passing 'fad' of science constructivism. It has, thankfully, seen its peak in the late 90s. This, along with "Prime Science", contain very little in terms of rigorous science, because it contains very little writing. That is not a joke! Huge graphics, lengthy--and tedious--labs are found throughout. Expository writing is nearly absent, except in the appendix section in the back. As a public school teacher trying to provide an exciting and challenging curriculum to my middle school students, I found Science Plus to be incredibly difficult to use. I had to spend enormous amounts of time gathering and writing supplementary material for my students. "Defending" Science Plus to my student's parents was awkward at best. "Why don't I see my son at home doing homework using his textbook ?" was a constant problem, because I didn't want to 'trash the District' for picking such a lousy text, but I couldn't defend the text either because it was nearly worthless, and anyone who understood curriculum could see that plainly. Obviously it was an acute dilemma that could have, and should have been avoided.
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