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Science and the Search for God Paperback – March 1, 2003


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Science and the Search for God + The Souls of Animals + Goodbye, Friend: Healing Wisdom for Anyone Who Has Ever Lost a Pet
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Lantern Books (March 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590560450
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590560457
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5.2 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,339,037 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Gary Kowalski is a Unitarian Minister and the author of The Bible According to Noah (Lantern, 2001) and The Souls of Animals. He lives in Burlington, Vermont.

More About the Author

Reverend Gary Kowalski is the author of bestselling books on animals, nature, history and spirituality. A graduate of Harvard College and the Harvard Divinity School, his work has been translated into German, French, Spanish, Japanese, Chinese and Czech, appeared in periodicals like Tikkun and Yoga Journal, and been voted a "Reader's Favorite" by the Quality Paperback Book Club.

Whether investigating the emotional lives of other species, de-mystifying the faith of America's Founding Fathers, unpacking the Bible or pondering the frontiers of modern physics, Gary's work centers on the connection of spirit and nature ... acknowledging our kinship with each other and with a universe that is passionate, evolving and alive.

To contact Reverend Kowalski, visit his website at www.kowalskibooks.com.

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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Jerrold M. Packard on April 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
Review - "Science and the Search for God"
As a boy, I often pestered my grandmother for answers to the Great Mysteries - "What came before time," "Who made God," "What's outside the universe." She said I'd just have to wait until I got heaven to find out. Then, she promised, I could just walk up to God's throne and ask him. In other words, don't worry about it.
At some point, I simply started putting the two incompatibles - science and God - into separate mental compartments. Not willing to accept religious stories as serious explanations for life, yet equally unwilling to renounce some kind of godly First Cause as responsible for life, it seemed better to keep the matters mentally, and emotionally, apart.
The Reverend Gary Kowalski, minister of the First Unitarian Universalist Society of Burlington, Vermont, makes a good argument that such segregation isn't needed. In "Science and the Search for God," the author gives us a gentle and gracefully written book in which he contends that faith and science should coexist on friendly, non-exclusive terms. "There is no reason that science should make us blind to the sacred in its prolific expression," he writes, "God is in the details - the lavishness and extravagance that bless every niche, nook and cranny of creation..."
It seems to me that I can live very nicely with that. I view as unarguable that wiggly creatures are our ultimate ancestors. But on the other hand I regard the mind as something far more than an evolutionary happenstance. Kowalski's book suggests the two views aren't contradictory, that the intellect that requires the former can live perfectly well with the faith that supports the latter.
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I've just finished reading Gary Kowalski's fine book, and give it a wholehearted five stars. It must stay on my shelf, to be pulled out again and again. For long time I've been deeply interested in the discoveries in quantum physics emerging during these years and the speculations they raise. I've read a fair amount of what a reasonably literate, but math-challenged reader can sort of comprehend. Given that there really are mathematical prerequisites for a full understanding of these things, Kowalsky brings me closer than I've ever been brought before. He is a truly fine writer, and that matters. He is also a deep and stimulating thinker.

The subject of the book is exactly what its title says: "Science and the Search for God." Kowalski doesn't prescribe a simplistic answer for that search, but brings me on a journey of questioning and possibility as we travel through this stranger and stranger universe of ours, with its movement and dimensions, its strings and quarks, and all its parts, including me, that may even share active roles in its being what it is. I strongly recommend it.
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By Beav on August 29, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bougt and this book and was thrilled by his concepts. I loaned it out and never got it back so I downloaded the Kindle edition and was disappointed without knowing exactly why. It seemed like the language was somehow less poetic and uplifting in the Kindle version and there were some editing errors.d
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Format: Paperback
"A time to tear,
And a time to sew;
A time to keep silence,
And a time to speak;" -- Ecclesiastes 3:7 (NKJV)

Reverend Kowalski makes the obvious point that science is advancing very rapidly, and that non-scientists can gain a lot by understanding and applying that new learning. Much of what is being learned raises more fundamental questions, ones that the scientific perspective may not be able to answer on its own. Drawing on examples as wide-ranging as Gaia Hypothesis and the role of the observer in modern physics, he points to a connectedness that is felt, rather than measured, that faith can elaborate. He is encouraged by the establishment of the Templeton Foundation and other initiatives to encourage faith-science conversations.

Some won't like that he feels science has a role in defining who we see God as. Others won't like his attempt to embrace all perspectives. Surely those views and efforts should be less offensive than lobbing stones at either faith or science merely to defend one's own preferential source of enlightenment.

If you don't already believe that dialogue can occur and be fruitful, you should read this book. It will help you see past the rhetoric that divides faith and science in too many cases.
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This book is a rich mixture of fascinating science packaged for the lay reader, nuggets of spiritual writings by top flight scientists, contributions to science by men of the cloth, and a broad array of theological exposition. This composite is held together with personal stories and bits wisdom from Gary Kowalski, a Unitarian Universalist (UU) minister, and served up in an informal conversational style. It is a wonderful antidote to the science versus religion meme flowing today.

One of the subtexts is an arc of history which starts before there was a schism in knowledge between religious beliefs and scientific knowledge. Gary Kowalski would like to see the arc come back to a conversation about the big questions that involves all free thinkers. I am also a UU and very comfortable with science. I am comfortable with atheism, but, you can never prove a negative assertion. My current fascination is how much wiggle room do we need to make the gods possible. If Reality was just the 3 dimensions plus time, one cold claim that there was no mystery and that God could not exist. But Gary walks thru many several corners of science - what came before the big bang, the uncertainty principle, quantum mechanics the seem to leave some room for mystery. This sense is reinforced by scientists. An example is the J.B.S. Haldane quote "the Universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we CAN suppose". Many longer wonderful passages by the likes of Einstein, Feynman and Schrödinger.

Two chapters really spoke to me: one on the Gaia hypothesis and the other on process theology. While process theology feels very real whenever I can wrap my mind around it, it can be a little vague. A bit like the force or a giant magnet pulling us towards our best selves.
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