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Science of the X-Men Mass Market Paperback – February 24, 2004


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: I Books/Marvel (February 24, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743487257
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743487252
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 4.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,868,329 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Link Yaco is currently a web editor for IBMand is a contributing writer to the Marvel-related magazine The Jack Kirby Collector. Karen Harber created the bestselling the Mutant Season series and co-authored the first volume of the same title with her husband Robert Silverberg. She is a respected journalist and an accomplished fiction writer. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

Don;t waste your money, and if you just REALLY REALLY need to read it because you are an X-Men fan then check your local library.
Alicja Z.
Several sections are very unfocused: rather than attempting to explain a mutant's powers, those sections describe various tangentially-related scientific phenomena.
Sameer
I might even have overlooked these glaring problems if the writing about the characters had been good, but quite frankly, it wasn't.
Robert Street

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 52 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 8, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Think of it as a comic book lover's guide to basic science. This book doesn't so much debate the plausibility of a mutant's powers as it explains the laws of physics that would govern the use of them. It's overly simplistic in some places and needlessly complex in a few others, but mostly it's an easy, straight-forward read. Out of the 19 mutants that they profile they include all the originals (Jean, Cyclops, Beast, Iceman, Angel), some odd choices (Scarlet Witch, Unus the Untouchable) and miss some good opportunities (Banshee in particular). The section on psi-powers is probably the weakest, but the strong analysis of Wolverine and Magneto mostly make up for it. The character bios seem very accurate and detailed and the one error that I noticed is more likely a problem with editing than with the authors. On the whole it's a much better book than I expected it to be.
Other mutants included: Nightcrawler, Shadowcat, Quicksilver, Mastermind, Colossus, Havok, the Blob, Xavier, Storm, and Rogue plus sections on Cerebro and the Sentinels
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Robert Street on January 6, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The concept of this book is excellent and the introduction is good. This completes the list of nice things I have to say about the book. The artwork varies from good to dismal, the science is often poor or simply wrong (a list of my favorites: Stephen Jay Gould is a controversial evolutionist!, most scientists believe evolution of higher life forms from nothing is inevitable(?), superstring theory is presented as a fact, only primitive civilizations have polytheistic religions(I'd love to know where he got this one from and how the Hindus of the world feel about it), and the section on the Brood shows such a fundamental lack of understanding of evolutionary theory that I was almost in tears). I might even have overlooked these glaring problems if the writing about the characters had been good, but quite frankly, it wasn't. The author mentions the possibility of sequels in the introduction; in response I say: Please don't.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Lincoln Yaco on December 11, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The story behind the book is probably more interesting than the book itself. For starters, let me tell you that Karen whatsername had nothing whatsoever to do with this book. Byron Preiss (recently deceased), the publisher, put her name on this because she is the WIFE of ROBERT SILVERBERG, famous SF author. He hoped that if he hired her as a copyeditor, Silverberg would look it over. Not only did Silverberg ignore it, so did she.

If this thing was copyedited, then why all the terrible typos?

This thing wasn't even SPELLCHECKED!

I rewrote this like, five times. Preiss took incomplete drafts from different rewrites of various chapters, and put them together OUT OF SEQUENCE so they contradict each other in places.

I have yet to receive complete payment after over FIVE YEARS.

Now that Byron is dead, I guess I will never get paid.

Well, it was nice to be able to say I wrote a book, but the unnerving experience of being screamed at by Byron's neurotic assistant editor who had never edited a book before, hardly made the task a joy. The result is so slapdash that I have never been able to open the covers and actually read it. GAD, there are so many TYPOS!

BYRON PREISS had a reputation and as soon I signed the contract and announced it to various zines and groups, other authors who had worked for Byron began to approach me to warn me about hiim.

So none of it came as a suprise. I KNEW what I was in for. But that didn't make it any more pleasant.

But...good things came of it, so it was well worth it. My nerves jangled for some time afterward, but that's life in the publishing biz in New York City. A real contest of egos. It is easy to face them down and I did so many times (all so childish) but it is so TRYING.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 9, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Personally speaking as a long-time X-men fan, I find this book an interesting piece of fiction...but not as interesting as the fiction which motivates it. The Physics of Star Trek succeeds where this book fails simply because it is written by a scientist who can see the mistakes in the logic of Star Trek yet is able to admire the prescience and veracity of its many writers. X-men is mostly based on a biological phenomenon, yet this book is quick to point out how all of their powers are so mysteriously derived. And when the authors are stumped, they owe the powers to mini-wormholes within the characters' bodies. This book is interesting to fans because it features characters they know and love, but it is a horrendous atrocity to anyone who would like to ponder the origin of mutant powers. These authors have nothing on Stan Lee and his cosmic rays, gamma rays and radioactive spiders. I can bear the typos, but the complete lack of parsimony is appalling.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 23, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Overall I would say this is an quality read. The different views of the manifestaions of mutant powers were intriguing. It covered a good deal of my favorite X-MEN but I want to read about some of the others. My only complaint about Science of the X-MEN would be the numerous amount of typos. It really took away from making this book excellent. Especially since this was such a scientific book. (Spell check anyone?) But other than that I like this and would recommend it.
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