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Scientific Creationism Paperback


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Scientific Creationism + Evolution vs. Creationism: An Introduction + Critical Thinking
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 277 pages
  • Publisher: Master Books; 2nd edition (December 12, 1974)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0890510032
  • ISBN-13: 978-0890510032
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)

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Customer Reviews

Isn't that an ad hominem argument?
Tim Beazley
I can't in good conscience give it any more stars than that due to the content of the book itself, which is tremendously problematic.
Jason A. Beyer
For those who may be interested I also have a book out on the subject.
Babu

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Wade A. Tisthammer on January 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
Henry M. Morris and the Institute for Creation Research (ICR) present a summary of arguments for what they call "scientific creationism" (in this book, their "scientific creationism" makes no explicit reference to Scripture). Although I do not exactly believe in naturalistic evolution, there have been much more legitimately scientific criticisms of evolution than this book (e.g. "Mere Creation").
Although the book tried to distinguish between "Biblical creationism" (creationism based on the Bible) and "scientific creationism" (creationism based on scientific evidence and making no explicit reference to the Bible) the distinction could have been done much better. At its worst, the book states (p. 188) that the "creation model" would "predict" that the origin of civilization would be located around Mount Ararat (where Noah's Ark is said to be) or near Babylon (where the Tower of Babel allegedly existed). Such "predictions" are clearly based on religion and not on creationism in its less religious form.
On the upside, "Scientific Creationism" does refute the myth that all real scientists are evolutionists. The book presents a list of creation scientists who reviewed the book (pp. i-ii), the vast majority of which hold Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in relevant areas. Even so, anti-evolutionists and even ICR itself have presented significantly better, more legitimately scientific cases for creationism (such as "What is Creation Science?" by Morris and Gary E. Parker) since the book was published.
I do think there are some good, rational, legitimately scientific criticisms of evolution (I am not an adherent of Darwin's theory), but this book does not go far in providing them. The arguments presented in this book are often strained, overgeneralized, and not very scientific.
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67 of 103 people found the following review helpful By Jason A. Beyer on June 5, 2004
Format: Paperback
*Scientific Creationism* is the Institute for Creation Research's summa against evolution. I gave the book three stars because it is well written, and does an outstanding job of summarizing the views of several major creationists, most notably Henry Morris (who is responsible for most of the written text) and Duane Gish. I can't in good conscience give it any more stars than that due to the content of the book itself, which is tremendously problematic.
Start with the goal of the book. The book is supposed to be used as a resource for balanced teaching of evolution and creation. However, the whole book is devoted to criticizing evolution. Not exactly a presentation of "balanced treatment". Maybe the ICR thinks that evolution is already well enough understood by science teachers. However, unless they are deliberately misrepresenting evolutionary theory (which I find it very hard to rule out), their own presentation of evolution belies this claim. Similarly, some recent studies have revealed that evolution is *not* well understood, not even by those who teach it to high school students. One may also take issue with the general approach of the book--attempting to refute evolution, even if successful, does nothing to bolster creationism. This work does not even *attempt* to show how creationism explains the relevant data--it merely asserts that it predicts it. For all this book tells us, evolution and creationism might *both* be lousy. Don't bother looking for it in their other works either; I've tried, and come up with a big goose egg for my troubles.
Second, the title. Unfortunately, on their *own* standards, creationism is *not* scientific.
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21 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Maenad on August 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
I've been reading the reviews on Amazon and I have to say that creationism in the form of ID is mounting the most intelligent attack to date on the problems with evolutionary theory. There are parts of evolutionary theory we have empirically observed, such as mutations within species but we haven't sufficiently observed transitions from one species to another, that's largely an act of faith on the part of evolutionists, whose definition of transitional fossils isnt actually satisfying to me. The part of intelligent design that postulates intelligent design hasnt been proved and would be difficult if not impossible to prove. BUt I would think that anyone who considers themselves scientific would know to research some of the problems raised against the fossil record (to which evolutionists reply that not the best fossils have been fossilized, thats like saying "We cant find it because it was never fossilized but it does exist" not exactly empirical)
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50 of 79 people found the following review helpful By Tim Beazley on June 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
Reading this creationist book will turn your brain into mush. Just read the previous creationist review for evidence of that.
The previous creationist review criticized my previous review for allegedly employing an 'ad hominem' logical fallacy. Huh???
Ad hominem attacks are attempts to undermine arguments by appealing to irrelevant, usually emotional arguments. For example, If Steve Jobs said, "Bill Gates is a pedophile, therefore Microsoft computers are no good; buy an Apple computer instead," that would be an ad hominem argument. Pedophilia has nothing to do with computers, therefore the attack is an illogical ad hominem fallacy.
The alleged ad hominem attack in my review, however, did not involve an irrelevant characteristic at all, but rather commented on Henry Morris' well-established reputation for DISHONESTY. I think most sensible people would agree that honesty is highly relevant in writing textbooks!
Interestingly, the creationist then went on to contemptuously dismiss Raelianism as a "cult." Hello??? Since when are cults simply presumed to be wrong? Isn't that an ad hominem argument?
Finally on this point, the creationist writer failed to address the fact that Henry Morris himself relies very heavily on ad hominem arguments. If ad hominem arguments are objectionable, then why doesn't the creationist reviewer object to Henry Morris' reliance on them?
The creationist reviewer criticized me for saying that Pope John Paul II's endorsement of evolution disproved Henry Morris' claim that evolution is an inherently atheistic philosophy. The creationist reviewer's response that the Pope is not infallible is completely irrelevant. I did not claim the Pope was infallible, but merely that he was an evolutionist.
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