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Scoreboard, Baby: A Story of College Football, Crime, and Complicity Paperback – September 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books (September 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803228104
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803228108
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #136,674 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Expanding upon a groundbreaking series they wrote for the Seattle Times in January 2008, reporters Armstrong and Perry tell a riveting but sordid tale of the University of Washington’s 2000 football squad, which included at least 24 players arrested or charged with crimes during their years at the university, crimes for which they did little or no time. Complicit were university officials, team coaches, local police and prosecutors, members of the media, even victims, all in the name of sustaining a winning program. Some of the crimes were egregious: a tight end under investigation for suspicion of rape; a safety who, according to police, broke his wife’s nose and arm; and a linebacker under investigation for robbing and shooting a drug dealer. While the focus is specifically on the University of Washington program, this story carries importance and relevance to fans far beyond Seattle. Investigative journalism at its most revealing. --Alan Moores

Review

"However familiar the underlying conflict might seem, there''s an added layer of tension and tragedy to the narrative that makes Scoreboard, Baby a particularly distressing tale and one that should be required reading for anyone linked to university life." Libby Sander, Chronicle of Higher Education

"While the focus is specifically on the University of Washington program, this story carries importance and relevance to fans far beyond Seattle. Investigative journalism at its most revealing." Alan Moores, Booklist Online

"Ken Armstrong and Nick Perry have written a classic. . . . Through extensive review of public records and interviews, the authors detail the complicity of Seattle community members, law enforcement officials, coaches, players, members of the legal profession, local media, and the university in this tale of "twisted values." Dick Stull, Arete</div>

"Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, some of America''s top universities still perpetuate the myth of the "student-athlete." Armstrong and Perry sound the death knell of that hoary fable by exposing the win-at-all-costs deprivation that thrived at UW under golden-boy coach Rick Neuheisel." --Kirkus

"What the investigative reporter Ken Armstrong and the higher-education correspondent Nick Perry have done, first in an award-winning Seattle Times series and now in Scoreboard, Baby, is lay out in hard-boiled style and with the verve only real story­telling can supply exactly whose lives were mangled in the course of the University of Washington's historic 2000 season." --Marc Tracy, New York Times

"A remarkable book." --Steve Weinberg, Seattle Times

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Customer Reviews

The authors of this do a good job of simply presenting the facts and letting them tell the story.
Amazon Customer
I was ashamed of myself reading this book, that I didn't know - and isn't that how great evil occurs, when good people don't know, or look the other way.
P. R. Seebeck
It will also appeal to anyone who likes true-crime books and to anyone who just likes a great read.
Mark Di Vincenzo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Richard A. Stull on August 4, 2010
Format: Paperback
Armstrong, Ken and Nick Perry. Scoreboard, Baby: A Story of College Football, Crime, and Complicity. Cloth: alk.paper: 372 pages. University of Nebraska Press (2010) ISBN -978-0-8032-2810-8. Includes bibliographic references and index.

Reviewed by Dick Stull

The title, "Scoreboard, Baby" was former Colorado Buffaloes football coach Rick Neuheisel's retort to comments made by the losing coach who accused Neuheisel's players of illegal tactics on the field. A few years later Neuheisel was paid $1,000,000 to revive the Washington Huskies football program. He delivered a "mystical, magical dream season" in the year 2000, culminating in a dramatic Rose Bowl victory. Armstrong and Perry's thorough and compelling investigation reveals the facts behind a different scoreboard. Four of every five players failed to meet minimum University of Washington admission standards. One out of three players graduated. Twenty-four players on Washington's 2000 football team were arrested or charged with some crime during their years at the university. The authors write:
"Some players do serious damage. Some get used up. A city looks away and the game goes on. Variations of this story-more about culture than sports, more about a community than a team - can be found in colleges across the country. Florida State, Ohio State, Texas A&M. Washington isn't an aberration, it is an example."
Through extensive review of public records and interviews, the authors detail the complicity of Seattle community members, law enforcement officials, coaches, players, members of the legal profession, local media, and the university in this tale of "twisted values."
A sorority student is raped, allegedly by another player.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Frank G. Splitt on September 6, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ken Armstrong's and Nick Perry's SCOREBOARD, BABY like Paul Gallico's classic, FAREWELL TO SPORT, is replete with disturbing facts and allegations. The authors tell an equally disturbing story of college football, crime and complicity -- exposing a community's collective convoluted values -- while back in 1937 Gallico said "Colleges have managed to get themselves involved in a dirty and subversive business." The tale of this business is one of several dimensions and has been told in these and the other revelatory books listed below.

Over the years, revelatory books, reports, essays, and sporadic news stories have had little if any impact on the powers that be in Washington who give every indication of being asleep at the switch. Members of Congress and presidential administrations overlook the fact that there are all too many communities and universities throughout the nation where deep investigative reporting would unearth similar problems and societal passion for professionalized and highly commercialized intercollegiate sports competition. Since there is much in our colleges and universities that is already amiss, the depth of these sports related problems and the intensity of this passion could very well be predictive of the decline and eventual fall of higher education in America from its position of world leadership.

The SCOREBOARD, BABY narrative could serve as a fitting metaphor for the crime, complicity, and convoluted values associated with professionalized college sports in America with a one-to-one mapping of the book's cast of local characters, organizations, and citizens onto corresponding entities on the national scene. Why so?
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Nagronsky VINE VOICE on December 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
As a Husky fan for almost 50 years, and a Husky season ticket holder for over 25 years, 'SCOREBOARD, BABY' is maddening and frustrating, and while it looks at the UW 2000 team in sharp focus, the atmosphere portrayed at the U-Dub isn't just in Montlake. Star players ALWAYS get preferential treatment. From elementary school to high school, who among us hasn't been frustrated by seeing a jock(or a coach) get away with murder, or at least skipping classes, or getting cush gigs?
The 1969 Washington State boys basketball champs had a number of players busted at a kegger, but were allowed to serve their suspensions after the State Tournament. In the Hugh McIlhenny years of the early 1950's, boosters such as "Torchy" Torrance got players jobs where they were paid while not having to work. In the 1970's, a squad of co-eds was formed at the UW called "Husky Honeys", attractive women that it was hoped would distract visiting players. A friend of mine, a starting linebacker at USC under John McKay was offered a Camaro if he had chosen to play at Nebraska. A restaurant owner I met in Nebraska was the 'designated driver' for coach Bob Devaney when Devaney would get too drunk, which happened almost nightly. In a small town I lived in near Seattle, some coaches opened a drive-in near the high school, and star players only worked the front counter and not on the grill(if they worked at all).
The reviewer who only gave 'SCOREBOARD, BABY' one star calls this book "Poorly cited, inaccurately depicted...", but if you take the time to search for the articles cited, they are on the Web for the reading.
I regularly post on UW fan boards, and on the Seattle Times UW boards, and when I read about this book, I was incensed that anyone could slag The U & my Dawgs like this....
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