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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scott Continues To Entertain!
I can still barely believe that the Scott Pilgrim series is as good as it is. Author Bryan Lee O'Malley has taken a relationship drama and infused it with numerous references to video games, indie music, manga, and other niche areas of popular culture to create a world where characters are completely fine with breaking out into a massive, over-the-top fight that involves...
Published on September 17, 2006 by Andrew

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not as good as it should be
Although I absolutely loved all the vegan jokes going on in this volume, I think it might be my least favorite of the books yet. That's not to mean that there isn't a ton to love about this one, between the super vegan powers, the vegan police, getting to finally know more about the history between envy and scott, as well as the battle between envy and ramona. There's...
Published 1 month ago by Adam Oster


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scott Continues To Entertain!, September 17, 2006
By 
Andrew "Radaar" (Chicago, IL, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
I can still barely believe that the Scott Pilgrim series is as good as it is. Author Bryan Lee O'Malley has taken a relationship drama and infused it with numerous references to video games, indie music, manga, and other niche areas of popular culture to create a world where characters are completely fine with breaking out into a massive, over-the-top fight that involves the battleground imploding at the end.

Scott Pilgrim, for those of you who aren't caught up, is a 23-year-old slacker who lives in a small Canadian town around Toronto. He is in a bad band named Sex Bob-Omb along with the completely cool (so cool he has no emotions) Stephen Stills and the angry Kim Pine (whom he dated in high school). After breaking up with a 17-year-old high school girl named Knives Chau, Scott began dating Ramona Flowers, an American now living in Canada and working as an Amazon.ca delivery girl. However, before Scott can officially date Ramona, he must defeat her seven evil ex-boyfriends. He has already taken out 2, but the next on the list, Todd Ingram, may prove to be more than Scott can handle.

Picking up pretty much exactly where the second volume, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, left off, Scott and Ramona have just learned that Todd is dating Natalie V. "Envy" Adams, Scott's girlfriend before Knives who ripped his heart out. Through flashbacks, we learn how Envy met Scott as a shy anime fan and eventually turned into a rock goddess. If that weren't bad enough, Todd is a vegan, and in Scott's world, vegans attain vast psychic powers that make him a much more formidable opponent than Matthew Patel and Lucas Lee.

As usual, the battles don't take up the whole book; most of the pages are devoted to hilarious character studies. Scott's roommate, Wallace Wells, is just as funny as ever, with his snide comments about Envy and his platonic love of Ramona. Knives is great due to the sheer sadness of her situation (I kind of feel bad for her, but she is responsible for some very funny and heartfelt situations). New characters like Envy and Lynette, Envy's drummer who has a biomechanical arm, are fun as well. But the book is also full of great moments that don't deal with characters. The existence of a save point in the world was one of the funniest things I've seen in a long time. And of course, the fights just keep getting better. Ramona shows that she can hold her own and that her little handbag is just full of surprises.

The only thing I have to say that is negative is that I just can't get a good feel for the art. It is (as far as I know) intentionally cheap, but there are times when I can't tell who certain characters are or when the flashbacks end. Still, it isn't too much of a problem.

I don't care what excuses you may have for not reading Scott Pilgrim, get on it now! The story is great and the humor is fantastic.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clever, Inventive Fun, November 24, 2009
This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
How to describe Scott Pilgrim and his strange little world? It's funny, to be sure. It's seemingly normal, to a degree. When we meet new characters, we often get their level rating (Scott is, of course, "awesome"). Everything about the series is so Generation Now--Scott is straight but he has a gay roommate; they share a small studio apartment and sleep in the same bed, platonically; Scott plays in a band with a female drummer, which is cool, although the band doesn't quite rock at first (but they have heart). None of it is overdone, though. In fact, there's so much genuine sweetness to it (in a good way; not in some treacly, sentimental manner) that you can't help but wish you were part of the group--part of this world, even, because it's a pretty different world.

That is to say, it's Toronto, but some magical, videogame-like qualities exist. These characters exist mostly in the real world but at the same time, it has some decidedly offbeat properties. Scott is an innocent, a supercool, eminently likable cipher who happens to be almost irresistibly endearing.

As the series begins, 23-year-old Scott has just started dating Knives Chau, a 17-year-old high school student. It's all very innocent; they haven't even kissed, just hugged. Scott is recovering from a devastating breakup a year ago and views Knives as a way to move on without getting his heart too involved. His friends and sister waste no time ripping into Scott for this robbing-the-cradle transgression, but Scott sticks with it, even after meeting Ramona Flowers. Ramona is the girl of Scott's dreams, literally. He keeps seeing her in visions, so when he sees her at a party, come to life in strange garb, he makes his move.

The series has the feel of a gentle romantic comedy at times, and the banter back and forth between Scott and Ramona (and even Scott and Knives) has the kind of meet-cute quality of cinema. It's also hilariously hip, metatextual, and self-referential (again, it's a Generation Now thing). When Ramona explains that she's been in Scott's dreams because there's a really convenient subspace highway that happens to run through his head, Scott doesn't really question it. Later, they get to know each other and decide that some of their stories will be revealed in different volumes, before sleeping together (again, platonically, because they've been holed up inside together because of a freak blizzard--although it's clear both characters will want to do more than just sleep together eventually).

And here we come to the real meat of the story. As Scott begins to see Ramona, he first receives an email, then a letter, from a man who wants to schedule time to fight Scott. Scott ignores them, but this is a crazy guy who won't be ignored. It turns out Ramona has seven evil ex-boyfriends, all of whom Scott will have to fight and defeat if he wants to continue seeing the delightful Ramona. (And if you're wondering what ever happened to Knives Chau, well, there's more to that as well.)

The content is never too adult (but trust me, adults will--and do--enjoy it quite a bit), but it's more appropriate for teens and older (the publisher gives it a 13+ rating). The story and art are definitely manga-influenced, but it isn't straight manga. It's a hybrid. A very good hybrid, it turns out. Scott Pilgrim is one of those series that catches fire and, when you check in to see what all the buzz is about, you realize why immediately. This much clever, inventive fun deserves to be a smash.

-- John Hogan
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lover, Fighter, Slacker, Gamer--The Vegan Agenda, November 2, 2010
This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
"Scott Pilgrim vs. the World," the striking film version of the inspired series by Bryan Lee O'Malley, had a disappointing run this year in terms of box office. Even with surprising critical support, the film fell below expectations from a money making standpoint. Now, as we are poised for the DVD release (11/9/10), I think the world of Scott Pilgrim is about to explode as new fans to the irreverent charm of Scott and company discover the delightfully skewed source material. And I thought, I'd recap the highlights as I've gone back to appreciate the six volumes anew.

Volume Three: Scott Pilgrim & The Infinite Sadness. In 2006, O'Malley released my favorite volume to date. As Scott's ex Envy (a successful rocker) is back, it provides a welcome romantic foil for Ramona. Their break-up was devastating to Scott and much of this chapter's humor is derived by exploiting the toxicity of relationships. But dealing with Envy is only part of the problem when it's discovered that Ramona's third ex is also in Envy's band (and dates her!) The overlapping of various bonds make this a delightfully complicated mess and the Vegan agenda has never been so diabolically wrought. Great, funny stuff!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tooo Cooolll, September 14, 2012
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This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
Literally the best thing ever. If I could marry this book, I totally would. Scott Pilgrim is the bestest. for. ever.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Scott Pilgrim is an infinite delight, October 30, 2010
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This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
Once upon a time, a comic artist named Bryan Lee O'Malley did a comic series around a central character named Scott Pilgrim. That comic series got made into a movie called Scott Pilgrim Vs The World. The movie was not bad, but was definitely worth seeing if only because it made me want to read the comic series it was based on. And I'm here now to tell you that O'Malley's original series is awesome. It's also almost impossible to describe, but I'll give it my best shot and say it's original, it's funny, it's way surreal, and it's probably unlike anything you've ever read.

On the surface, the plot arc of the six-volume series is centered around Scott Pilgrim, a twenty-something game-playing slacker in a Canadian garage band, who meets the girl of his dreams (literally) and finds he must defeat her seven evil ex-es if he wants to date her. But like an iceberg, the surface only hints at everything that lies beneath.

Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness is the third volume in the series. The cast of returning characters include:

Scott Pilgrim, a wide-eyed and likeable but perpetually clueless 23-year-old slacker who's in a garage band called Sex Bob-omb. ("Well... my last job is a really long story, filled with sighs. Maybe we can get into it in a later volume.")

Knives Chau, his 17-year-old Chinese former sort-of girlfriend who still has a major crush on him. ("I've kissed the lips that've kissed you!!!")

Wallace Wells, his cool but boy-crazy gay roommate. ("Let's be friends based on mutual hate.")

Stephen Stills, lead guitarist in the band. ("Do you always refer to him by his full name?" - "Who? Stephen Stills? Yes.")

Kim Pine, the band's drummer and Scott's ex-girlfriend from high school. ("Scott, are you evil, or are you really happy?")

Young Neil Nordegraf, Stephen Still's roommate and the band's biggest fan. ("What do you play?" "Um... nothing, I just live here.")

Comeau, who knows everyone. ("Well, I wouldn't say _everyone_, but yeah, I guess.")

Julie Powers, Stephen Stills' on-again/off-again but always bitchy girlfriend. ("Scott, I forbid you from hitting on Ramona, even if you haven't had a girlfriend in over a year.")

Stacey Pilgrim, Scott's younger sister. ("She's Chinese? Wait till Mom hears about this!")

Ramona Flowers, a roller-blading delivery girl for Amazon.ca and the girl of Scott's dreams. ("No, no, it's just like, this really convenient subspace highway happens to go through your head.")

Envy Adams, Scott's former girlfriend (and former bandmate) who's now a huge success with her own band, The Clash At Demonhead.

And in this volume we meet Lynette Guycott, Envy's drummer who apparently has a bionic arm, and last but not least, Envy's other bandmate and current boyfriend, Todd Ingram, a rockstar with Vegan superpowers, the third of Ramona's evil ex-es to challenge Scott Pilgrim. ("It's a fact of science. The main thing to know is that I'm better than most people.")

Just read it. You'll be hooked.

I highly recommend this book (and the entire series) to anyone who appreciates a comic series with a unique visual style, engaging characters, the kind of surreal world we only wish we could live in, and just a great fun read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Scott Pilgrim just gets better, February 22, 2011
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This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
So much depth for a graphic novel. I became interested in these stories because I really enoyed the movie. One of the great strengths of the movie and definately one of the strengths of these graphic novels is the strong ensemble of characters. The great thing about these stories is how O'Malley shows us the character of Scott Pilgrim by how his friends respond to him. Unlike most stories the books really follow not only the protagonists, Scott and Ramona, but their friends as well. In some ways Scott Pilgrim is the least interesting character when stacked up against Knives, Kim, Ramona, NV Adams, Lisa, Wallace and Stephen Stills.
The art work is far more interesting than the stock imagery of most manga, and O'Malley's determination to constantly change his characters hair and clothing, unlike the normal convention in comics of identical clothing and hair, really pays off and tells the story of his character's moods and growth over time. The dialogue is excellent, well paced, clever and bright. The framing, the action, and the expressiveness of the characters makes you feel like you are part of the story rather than just watching it through the artwork.
I really enjoyed the first two books but here in book three O'Malley really hits his stride and comes up with Scott's Evil Ex NV Adams. As somebody said, (I don't know who) "The measure of a hero/person/character is the hatred of their enemies".

Well done and I hope O'Malley brings us something new soon.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A top favorite graphic novel of mine., August 21, 2009
This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
Scott Pilgrim has quickly become one of my favorite graphic novel series. However, volume 3 is by far my favorite one. Indie comics have a lot to offer a wide variety of audiences from someone wanting flashy action to someone who just wants a coming-of-age story of a confused 18-year-old. Bryan Lee O'Malley has come forward and shown that you don't need expanded universes of cut-and-paste super heroes with ridiculous continuities and laughable dead-then-alive-again story arcs. Scott Pilgrim shows that the fun doesn't have to take a back seat to the professional wrestling style of presentation and character development often seen in big super hero books. The mundane becomes the fantastic; the frivolous becomes fun; it shows a little slice of just how dominant the Nerd Culture is becoming in popular arts today. Kevin Smith is a master of the Star Wars reference. To that same effect, Bryan Lee O'Malley is a master of the Video Game reference.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Rolling on the Floor Laughing, June 22, 2010
By 
Tyler S. "Super-Review" (Brentwood, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
I don't even have to get into this much. This is the funniest comic I've read, and best in the Scott Pilgrim series. Now keep in mind that there are not too many humorous comics out there, but I doubt anyone can top "Scott Pilgrim and the Infinite Sadness." It's just as if Bryan Lee O'Malley snorted a giant line of clever and went hulk on the entire volume. I laughed at every page. Even my criticisms were demolished in this volume, because in an effort to avoid further confusion, they put a map of all the characters and relations on the first page. Best idea ever for a book with this many characters. I have nothing at all bad to say about this book.

Need I convince you more? Volume 3 is the best yet! When Thanksgiving comes around I will be giving thanks to Scott Pilgrim for existing and bringing genuine laughs into my life. And for referencing all the great video-games and being friggin awesome!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The One Where It Becomes GREAT, July 13, 2010
By 
Jesse Haller (Minneapolis, MN USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
I started to read the series some years ago, with this book's release, and have been following ever since. With the final book being released, I'm rereading and reviewing the earlier books.

The humor, action, and drama have finally come into perfect balance in this volume. O'Malley's line work has come to the high level that we'll see through the rest of the series. The characters are more flushed out and well-rounded. I believe this is the volume that turned the series into a phenomenon.

This book, and the series as a whole, is perfect for the 17 to 25 year old range, that are growing up in the same culture and going through the same experiences as Scott and his friends. Anyone up into their 30's can get a kick out of the series, being able to look back and laugh about that time in their lives.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not as good as it should be, November 18, 2014
By 
Adam Oster (Eau Claire, Wisconsin) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness (Paperback)
Although I absolutely loved all the vegan jokes going on in this volume, I think it might be my least favorite of the books yet. That's not to mean that there isn't a ton to love about this one, between the super vegan powers, the vegan police, getting to finally know more about the history between envy and scott, as well as the battle between envy and ramona. There's giant hammers, extra lives, and a whole host of other imaginative, crazy things that make this a wonderful addition to the series.
It just wasn't as good as the ones that came before it.
That being said, I can definitely tell that this volume shows O'Malley finally stretching his writing muscles, so I expect that volume 4 should be the best yet.
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Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness
Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness by Bryan Lee O'Malley (Paperback - May 24, 2006)
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