A Scream Goes Through the House and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$15.89
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.00
  • Save: $1.11 (7%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
A Scream Goes Through the... has been added to your Cart
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Scream Goes Through the House: What Literature Teaches Us About Life Paperback – August 10, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0812972436 ISBN-10: 0812972430

Buy New
Price: $15.89
24 New from $7.99 39 Used from $1.11
Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.89
$7.99 $1.11

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

A Scream Goes Through the House: What Literature Teaches Us About Life + The Fiction of Relationship
Price for both: $38.64

Buy the selected items together
  • The Fiction of Relationship $22.75

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks (August 10, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812972430
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812972436
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #410,028 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"This book is about the urgency, centrality, and reach of human feeling," begins Weinstein, a Brown University literature professor, proposing to use the key works of a wide range of artists-William Blake, James Baldwin, Eugene O'Neill, Edvard Munch and Ingmar Bergman, among others-to demonstrate the ways in which "art is sustenance; art is transformation." An early chapter manages to breathe new life into one of the most co-opted images of recent memory, Munch's masterwork The Scream, and announces a persistent theme of the links between bodies, which can be hurt, diseased or dead, and feelings. The middle three chapters ("Living in the Body"; "Diagnosis: Narratives of Exposure"; "Plague and Human Connection") engage a host of medical analogies, even comparing an EKG with "soul searching," followed by the quandary of "Saying Death," which asks the rhetorical question: "Is our thinking itself not saturated with death?" While most of the actual works Weinstein points toward go a good way toward posing and answering difficult questions in complex and compelling ways, his book often hems in their multifaceted characters. An epilogue, offering yet another examination of Hamlet, notes: "Depression has its writers"; this meta-work does not finally bring us closer to many of those here, or their mortal coils.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Weinstein dreamed one night that his parents wailed in lament, a scream that awakened the entire household. Stunned by the porousness of the subconscious, struck anew by the inextricable interlacing of body and soul, and inspired to contemplate ever more deeply the role art plays in our struggle to come to terms with death, Weinstein embarks on a fresh and original interpretation of somatically oriented works. Discursive and mind expanding, Weinstein's exciting critical foray maps the great themes and revelations of art, which, he insists, is not an intellectual exercise but rather a grand effort to convey what it feels like to be alive. Weinstein discerns intriguing links between medicine and literature (his chapter "Plague and Human Connection" couldn't be more timely and instructive) and excels at lively psychological interpretations of diverse works in which writers and artists transform objective reality into "the supreme subjective record of life." Blending the literary passion of Harold Bloom with the physiological insights of Antonio Damasio, Weinstein offers splendid readings of the creations of James Baldwin, Ingmar Bergman, Edvard Munch, Kafka, Faulkner, William Burroughs, and Toni Morrison, declaring, "Art connects. Art equips. Art is sustenance." Donna Seaman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 11 customer reviews
It's a solid traditional approach.
Panopticonman
I talked about it to everyone I knew while I was reading and then bought copies for them!
L. Walden
I shouldn't get the feeling I've read more than he has.
USA Student

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Panopticonman on February 26, 2004
Format: Hardcover
As a real fan of Arnold Weinstein's terrific lectures on both American and World Literature (from the Teaching Company, but which I borrow from my library), I had high expectations for this book. My expectations were exceeded. That's because in the lectures, Dr. Weinstein focuses almost exclusively on literature. That's not a bad thing. It's a solid traditional approach. But in this text he is also free to draw in art, theater and film where appropriate, and to treat his material thematically, instead of on a book by book basis, a practice which tends to marginalize overall thematic observations. Also, in this format Dr. Weinstein can engage in digressions, and not worry about taking up too much time doing so, as he might in a lecture situation.
Here's an example of a short digression that I found particularly insightful: "One of the ironies of modern culture is its peculiar treatment of high art. Either we subject it to the rigors of modern critical theory, so as to disclose the hidden ideological arrangements it contains; or we piously commit it to the scholar's care, with the implicit view that we "laypeople" do not have the tools of access to frequent such work with any degree of profit. It would be better if we taught our students to view all art as fair game, to approach the most formidable and hermetic works as an aspiring thief might; with intent to break and enter, to discover, steal and possess what is there." Page 334.
Summarizing his insights at the end of this highly engaging text, he meditates on the tragedy of modernity, which he sees as a surfeit of consciousness combined with a lack of human connection. Weinstein illustrates this observation most dramatically through Faulkner's Quentin Compson.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Killian HALL OF FAME on July 26, 2004
Format: Hardcover
For a visceral thrill we can always count on Arnold--not Schwarzenegger in this case, but Arnold Weinstein, whose books combine a whole lot of learning with the human touch of passion and the starkness of memory. Arnold's dream of a scream loud enough to wake up an entire household clues us in immediately that he is a sensitive, caring man, with definite issues regarding boundaries. No wonder he then focusses on the famous Munch painting in which space and time are caught up and expressed in a soundless scream, a visceral pain of being that transcends the visual and becomes auditory, or not quite.

Many professors have written reams about Munch's SCREAM, but few have managed to bring it into the mainstream of Western intellectual culture. As he did in his book about spaces and the heimlich, Weinstein constantly surprises and envigorates the tiredest old subjects, I can just imagine what he does to his students!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Michael E. Lewitt on August 21, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Professor Weinstein is one of the great teachers of literature, and one of the great humanists as well. His new book offers a compelling approach to literature, one that is not common in the academy by trying to de-intellectualize the reading of literature by connecting it to living, not thinking, our lives. His interpretations of Edward Munch's art are particularly compelling and novel, while his readings of literary works such as Toni Morrison's BELOVED are original and make one want to run out and read the book immediately. This is a completely original and human book and I recommend it highly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Ian Darling on November 25, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Weinstein's observations are like those moments you have in life where for an instant, a fog of clarity fills your heart and mind. He is that mist of understanding you cannot describe, and best of all he is accessible in portable paperback. I am currently a student of his and he gives a reader the tools of a new set of eyes that you put together by yourself as you learn. Why do we read things? Weinsteing will lead you to your own answer, and reading will never be the same. ...literature's LSD with no harmful side effects.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Freya on October 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Weinstein reminds us why we read--to access alien subjectivities and begin to understand the world in which we live. This beautifully written book legitimizes the discipline of English and compels us to marinade in and reflect on the fascinating phenomenon of consciousness.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Michael E. Lewitt on August 21, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Professor Weinstein is one of the great teachers of literature, and one of the great humanists as well. His new book offers a compelling approach to literature, one that is not common in the academy by trying to de-intellectualize the reading of literature by connecting it to living, not thinking, our lives. His interpretations of Edward Munch's art are particularly compelling and novel, while his readings of literary works such as Toni Morrison's BELOVED are original and make one want to run out and read the book immediately. This is a completely original and human book and I recommend it highly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search