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Scrumban - Essays on Kanban Systems for Lean Software Development (Modus Cooperandi Lean) Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Modus Cooperandi Lean
  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Modus Cooperandi Press (January 12, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0578002140
  • ISBN-13: 978-0578002149
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #789,243 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Bas Vodde on February 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
Scrumban in a small book by Corey Ladas self-published by lulu.com. The name is somewhat confusing since most of the book is about setting up a SW Kanban system and only a couple of pages are about scrumban (the hybrid between kanban and scrum).

Scrumban is an rather interesting book. I loved reading it and I think that it is an important contribution to software development. I say this even though I disagree with perhaps half of the book -- or at least consider them to be build upon shaky assumptions. Whether that is true or not, Corey delivers an interesting way of thinking about software development and a good basis for further discussion and improvement.

The book describes applying lean manufacturing techniques to software development. Unlike earlier lean material, it takes lean techniques and maps them to software on a very concrete level. The main technique taken from lean is the kanban technique for scheduling work. The book starts by describing "ideal" states of how software development should look like when mapping lean ideas to software. After that, it takes a couple of steps back and gradually builds up a kanban system by discussing one improvement to the system at the time. Halfway the book it describes how you can start applying kanban within your Scrum implementation and gradually improve it until its not scrum anymore, but kanban.

The end of the book discusses some more 'advanced' techniques like handling bugs, improving handovers, prioritizing backlogs and ... silver bullets :)

Corey tries to find a balance between traditional learnings and agile learnings. He tried to balance advantages of specialization with flexibility of generalization.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John Stoneham on April 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Corey Ladas offers a gentle, conversational, and opinionated introduction to kanban and pull systems in Scrumban. As Bas Vodde notes the title's a little misleading - but if you come from a Scrum background and you're encountering these ideas for the first time, it makes a lot of sense, because Corey introduces a continuum of possible software process outlines, explaining each evolution and the reasons for it.

I enjoyed this book because it's clear, it takes a stand, and Corey clearly states what's his opinion based on his experience. I don't agree with all of it - in particular I have trouble with the feature-brigade ideas at the end - but for walking through the basics of kanban and pull systems, focused on real workflows and not abstract theory, you can't beat it. It's short, concise, and well targeted to anyone who's already familiar with the ideas of Scrum and XP. Anyone who's doing Scrum should come to understand these ideas, to have greater insight into how their process is working, even if they don't implement them. They're useful thinking tools. (You NEED background in agile software development to make sense of this book, though.)

One of the biggest risks with an approach like this - one you -need- to mitigate - is promoting silos and handoffs, after all the work other agile methods have done to break down the walls. Corey notes this in passing - that you want to map the workflow of the work but avoid siloing people into activity boxes - but I worry he doesn't make this clear enough.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Earl Beede on December 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
Corey Ladas applies lean thinking to software development and, in general it is a good thought experiment. I like a lot what is in there and it helps me think through the things I need to say to my clients.

But I have two big "howevers".

First, why is every kanban and lean thinking book, this included, trying to compare software development to Toyota's manufacturing line? There isn't much overlap between software development and a manufacturing line except the unfortunate terms we use. Software development is all design, even coding is designing instructions for a compiler. The question shouldn't be how we do workflow in a manufacturing line but how do we do design and scale it. Fred Brooks recent book, the Design of Design, has important stuff on that.

Second is where do these nifty roughly equally sized work items for kanban come from? There is little to no discussion in this book (and many other software kanban books) where those wonderful work items come from. Most of my clients have these big feature ideas which take months to years to create with teams of 30 and I need a "feature" that is two weeks or less of work? Where did that come from? Who did that design?

Ladas does a fair job if you accept the two big "however" areas. This book is not for new people just trying to understand scrum and lean. It has a ton on insider references that can throw you off track if you are not familiar with them. Heck, I had to look up a few items and I am pretty well read. If you are a seasoned Scrum coach or aged methodologist, this book will give you good food for thought. Just keep the "howevers" in mind.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By IraqiInAmerica on May 15, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book can be very interesting had Mr. Ladas hired an editor. In its current state it seems to be a stream of consciousness, without any logic or structure and is very hard to follow. Sentences do not connect to each other, paragraphs are broken in odd places and context switching make this book a difficult read. This is too bad, since the content has the potential of providing excellent value.
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