Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sea Change Audio, Cassette – Abridged, Audiobook


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.50
Audio, Cassette, Abridged, Audiobook
"Please retry"
$5.11 $0.96
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Imagine a mix of Jaws and Godzilla with a touch of Titanic thrown in, and you'll have some idea of the scope and ambition of this debut techno-thriller from Canadian oceanographer James Powlik.

Like in Jaws, something weird is killing people along a coast--in this case, the Pacific Northwest. Like in Godzilla, something we've done to the environment has caused simple creatures--in this case, tiny marine protozoa--to go crazy and mutate into a new killer entity. The Titanic touch comes when billions of these nasty creatures gather together to form a huge floating blob the size of an iceberg, which gives off a noxious gas that not only dissolves human tissue but also stops boat and plane engines dead.

By the time marine microbiologist Brock Garner and his ex-wife, whale sonar expert Carol Harmon, figure out just what the murderous agent is, the mucky mountain is caught up in a terrific storm that is pushing it toward Seattle. And the government isn't doing a lot to stop it, because they know who's behind the monstrous mutation--a former Defense Department consultant who happens to be Carol's father.

Powlik keeps this all from falling into the dangerous waters of "high camp" by making sure his characters are as reality-based and accessible as his scientific expertise. --Dick Adler --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

A life-threatening plankton bloom (a fast-growing colony of microorganisms that eats every living thing in its path) is gathering strength off the coast of Washington State. Meanwhile, marine microbiologist Brock Garner and his ex-wife, Carol, who are investigating the mysterious death of Carol's brother, slowly realize that Mark is not the only fatality and that whatever is causing mass destruction among the marine population is a serious threat to all life in the area. Mobilizing what resources they can, the Garners and a small group of like-minded individuals set out to stop the colony from moving into Puget Sound. Biologist and oceanographer Powlik brings a great deal of real-life knowledge to this fantastical story of microorganisms running rampant. The possibility that such an event could actually happen helps make this a suspenseful and gripping tale. A good summer read; suitable for most fiction collections.AJo Ann Vicarel, Cleveland Heights-University Heights P.L., OH
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Spectrum by Alan Jacobson
FBI profiler Karen Vail's current case takes readers back to the beginning, with flashbacks to her rookie days as an NYPD patrol officer. "Spectrum" is a great way for new readers of the series to jump into the action. Learn more

Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Abridged edition (August 17, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553526723
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553526721
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 4.5 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,121,906 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

In fact, the science isn't even consistent within the book.
Nathan Tennies
Well, maybe not, but it is a fun read that will keep you turning the pages wanting to see what will happen next.
B. Larson
The characters are very vivid and true to their roles in the story.
William J. Winkler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 3, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While I appreciated the author's extensive research and obvious knowledge of his subject, he simply does not know how to write exciting fiction. The first few chapters started off with promise: inexplicable deaths. An ER doctor's horrifying loss of a child patient. A spooky ship far out at sea. And, yes, some funny repartee between characters. But from there, it became a tedious story of "telling, not showing," whereby the author tells us ABOUT what happens, but doesn't really show us the events with much vividness of language or even much dialogue. For instance, there's a scene toward the end where one helicopter loses altitude, crashing into a chopper below it. Crash! Lives lost! Sorry, but it was the most ho-hum description of a disaster I've ever read. I didn't bat an eye. Perhaps the most serious problem with this book was the nature of the "villain" itself. A microbe. Much as the author tries to infuse it with evil, it remains just that -- a microbe. And the heroes must race to -- well, kill it. That's it. Alas, not very exciting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E. Bukowsky HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
James Powlik has pulled off a remarkable feat. He has written a book with a great deal of complicated and technical scientific language, yet he makes the narrative exciting. "Sea Change" deals with an environmental threat that poses a tremendous danger to warm-blooded mammals in an area near Washington State and Vancouver, British Columbia. Powlik has a background in biology and oceanography, and although the book is fiction, there is a factual basis in what he writes. "Sea Change" is frightening in its implications and the action sweeps the reader along until the end. A word of warning--this book is not for the sqeamish. The characters and the dialogue are, for the most part, believable. Readers who love scientific mysteries will find "Sea Change" enthralling and thought-provoking.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jane E. Harkins on March 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This novel could have the same effect on beach-going as "Jaws" did years ago! Reading the preceding reviews, I am amazed that SEA CHANGE is Powlick's debut; rarely have I seen a first novel that was so concise and well-developed from a literary perspective and so suspenseful and challenging as entertainment. Powlick made difficult oceanographic and biological concepts easy to digest and enjoyable to ponder, in terms of their dangerous implications. The romance was anticipated but not unwelcome, as I cared about the characters, and those I didn't care for (the media-hound) got just deserves. Don't be afraid of this thriller!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Ehrhart on August 31, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book blends real-life science and a compelling mystery that makes for terrific beach reading! The author, James Powlik, takes a true-to-life menace from today's headlines and spins an exciting tale of suspense. In the tranquil waters of the Pacific Northwest, an invisible, indiscriminate killer is loose. As the body count begins to escalate, a group of intrepid scientists is left to make sense of the mystery and find out what has gone wrong. The storyline is quite clever and all the more intriguing because of the possibility that this type of disaster could really happen. I recommend this book to mystery lovers, action-adventure aficionados, and anyone concerned about real-life ecological issues.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Audrey on August 20, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book caught my attention as I was walking in a book store, and I just knew I had to buy it. I went with my gut instinct, and I'm glad I did! This story is amazing, and what's more amazing is that it could become a reality! The author knows a thing or two about such scientific matters, and I'm sure that he didn't just write this story to scare us, but because we should always be careful about our environment. We never really know what's out there. That's what makes it great. I would recommend it to anyone with strong guts, and a mind for science and mysteries. I sure enjoyed it, and I'm sure that a lot of people will agree with me. Read it, and you will not be dissapointed!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 9, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Oceanographer James Powlik strikes an excellent balance of science, action, and humanity (yes, that is still possible in a technothriller -- take note Crichton and Clancy). The menace du jour in protagonist Brock Garner's life is a toxic algae bloom that reads as believably as the latest headlines in the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd. Surrounding a core of credible science is a cast of believable, well-developed characters that lure the reader compulsively into page after page as the action mounts and the danger reaches strangulation levels. As Powlik himself asserts, we are not the commanders of Mother Nature as much as we'd like to think.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lindsay Kuhn on December 6, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book kept me riveted from beginning to end. The characters are believable and the science is just edgy enough to scare you into thinking a menace of this kind could really materialize. Yes, there is a lot of back and forth explanatory dialogue among the characters, but the issues are complex and the author doesn't dumb down the plot just to work in an explosion on every page (there is plenty of that anyway). I think the settings and pace of the story work well to give the reader the feeling of being on the inside of the action. I not only know what is happening, but I know why. The suspense builds nicely AND you end up caring about what happens to the characters at the end. I am looking forward to reading James Powlik's next one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews