Seabiscuit 2003 PG-13 CC

Amazon Instant Video

(608) IMDb 7.3/10
Available in HD
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True story of the undersized Depression-era racehorse whose victories lifted not only the spirits of the team behind it but also those of the nation as well.

Starring:
Jeff Bridges, Tobey Maguire
Runtime:
2 hours 21 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Seabiscuit

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Product Details

Genres Sports, Drama
Director Gary Ross
Starring Jeff Bridges, Tobey Maguire
Supporting actors Paul Vincent O'Connor, Chris Cooper, Michael Ensign, James Keane, Valerie Mahaffey, David Doty, Carl M. Craig, Michael O'Neill, Annie Corley, Michael Angarano, Cameron Bowen, Noah Luke, Mariah Bess, Jamie Lee Redmon, Ed Lauter, Gianni Russo, Sam Bottoms, Tobey Maguire
Studio Dreamworks
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

I don't like "feel good" movies.
Amazon Customer
The fact that the story is true makes "Seabiscuit" an even more beautiful and emotional journey.
Emily Todd
This is one of the best movies I have ever seen.
J. McAndrew

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

65 of 67 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 14, 2003
Format: DVD
The term "feel-good movie" is, like "popcorn flick" and "chick flick," one of those sweeping and usually inaccurate generalizations that are used to color any number of superficially similar films. If the definition is stretched broadly enough, "feel-good" can be used to describe anything from Chariots of Fire to My Big Fat Greek Wedding. In the summer of 2003, however, there were two movies for which "feel-good" was both accurate and complimentary. One was Bend it Like Beckham. The other was Seabiscuit.
For those not familiar with the story, Seabiscuit was a famous racehorse of the Depression era, competing between 1936 and 1940. His career is chronicled in the marvelous book Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand. Hillenbrand's lengthy, detail-rich narrative is, like many great books, too complex to transfer note for note to film, but writer-director Gary Ross takes on the formidable challenge of bringing Seabiscuit's tale to life on the big screen. Ross wisely chooses to follow Hillenbrand's lead, building the story around the three men who respectively owned, trained, and raced the horse: wealthy auto salesman Charles Howard (Jeff Bridges), cowboy Tom Smith (Chris Cooper), and jockey Red Pollard (Tobey Maguire). Ross makes shrewd choices about which details and characters to delete, which events to compress or eliminate altogether, and which aspects of the story to highlight. The result is a wonderful character-driven drama, a story about the power of friendship, love, hope, courage, and never giving up.
Ross takes his leisurely time introducing the three men.
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 2, 2003
Format: DVD
One of the best movies I've seen in a long time.. I think people fail to see what this movie is realy about..If you don't have a tear in your eye when George wolf and the biscuit break away from the admiral in the final stretch of the match race, than I think your realy missing the moment.. And you should be in full cry mode when Red Pollard breaks through the pack to win the Santa Anita Handicap.. Sure they could have talked more about events in the book,like Charles Howards other son, he's not mentioned once, or his friendship whith Bing Crosby, and how the biscuit had a rival with his horse. And lets not forget the Awsome performance by the Great Jockey Gary Stevens as the Ice Man himself George Wolf.. I think Gary was the perfect part for George and would have liked to see more of him.. His riding for the finish line in the match race was poetry in motion.. But all in all this movie is summed up in the end when they say this is about a horse that changed the lives of three men when in actuality it changed a country. It gave people light at the end of a dark tunnel, and showed with the right love and the Heart to do your best you can overcome anything. At least thats what I got out of it...
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61 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Emily Todd on September 1, 2003
In the middle of a summer of bad sequels "Seabiscuit" came along as a bit of fresh air. No other film this year thus far has been filled with such emotion, beauty, and heart. "Seabiscuit" is a rare gem of a film. It does not rely on special-effects, explosions, or cheap romances. The beauty of this film is that it is simply about the pure heart of a horse and the people around him.
Writer/Director Gary Ross (Pleasantville, Big) adapted Laura Hillenbrand's painstakingly researched bestseller into an amazing script. The story itself is so extraordinary that, if it hadn't happened, wouldn't have been remotely plausible as a film. If Seabiscuit wasn't a real horse, I would have taken one look at this film and said "Ridiculous! Like that could really happen!" The fact that the story is true makes "Seabiscuit" an even more beautiful and emotional journey.
Tobey Maguire plays Red Pollard, a half-blind, oversized jockey who was abandoned by his family as a child and now rides the worst horses at the worst races. Chris Cooper plays Tom Smith, an old fashioned horse trainer who prefers the company of a horse to that of a person who one day finds a barbed wire fence and cars in the middle of his wilderness homeland. Jeff Bridges plays Charles Howard, a self-invented millionaire dealing with the loss of his only son. These three "broken" men and a banged up little racehorse unite together and beat incredible odds to become an inspiration to a nation that isn't in the best shape itself.
Everything in this film is amazing. From the remarkable racing scenes to Randy Newman's haunting score, "Seabiscuit" is one film you won't want to miss. Please excuse my vagueness, I can't put into words how astounding this film is (as you can probably tell from this dismal review). I am just so in awe that words escape me!
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48 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Kala TOP 500 REVIEWER on December 13, 2003
Format: DVD
I never read the Laura Hillebrand book by the same name, but I did see the Seabiscuit movie and let me tell you - it was phenominal! I know some say it was cliche - but the story is TRUE! It's not just some Hollywood writer trying to come up with the latest feel good animal movie, it's actually true.
The acting was amazing in the movie. Tobey Macguire did a great job as alcholic jockey Red Pollard, and Chris Cooper was outstanding as the horse-whisperer-like trainer Tom Smith. Jeff Bridges (who is not one of my favorite actors) did a decent job in his role as well. One of the funniest characters was William H. Macy's announcer during the races, he cracked me up! Another surprisingly good performance was real life pro jockey Gary Stevens playing Red Pollard's friend and rival, jockey George Woolf.
The story is wonderful, taking place during the 1930's when the country is reeling from the Great Depression. Jeff Bridges character, Charles Howard, is a business man whose wife leaves him after their child is killed. He suffers from depression and ends up at a horse track where he meets a new girl and ends up buying the unruly Seabiscuit. He meets up with outcast horse trainer Tom Smith and the unpredictable Red Pollard and the three of them take America by storm with the amazing Seabiscuit.
The film is beautifully done. The locations are gorgeous and the race scenes are phenominal. Seabiscuit is a hero and an inspiration in his own right, not only because he won races - but also because he gave hope to so many people at a time when they really needed it.
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