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55 of 57 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Does work as NAS with simple setup if you know how.
I read the reviews, as well as performed searches online, before buying the Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex Net STAK100. Specifically, looking for a way to use it as a NAS and not fiddling around with Pogo.

A simple search on the net gave me this link:
[...]
Though titled for dockstar, this works for the Go Flex Net as well. The instructions are posted on...
Published on June 8, 2011 by Robert Bruhn

versus
95 of 98 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It works, but this isn't for everyone...
This is one of those products that is probably the reverse of most tech products. In this case, the average non-techie will probably love it - but people who know their way around computers are going to be baffled.

As with most products like this, I planned on just bypassing the Pogoplug service altogether and treating this like a networked docking station...
Published on September 1, 2010 by D. Matheny


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95 of 98 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It works, but this isn't for everyone..., September 1, 2010
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is one of those products that is probably the reverse of most tech products. In this case, the average non-techie will probably love it - but people who know their way around computers are going to be baffled.

As with most products like this, I planned on just bypassing the Pogoplug service altogether and treating this like a networked docking station. That would have been something I could really use. Unfortunately, it turned out to be a major hassle to access this device without using either the Pogoplug website or their desktop access software - and I'm not interested in using either of those methods.

According to the full manual, which is downloadable from the Seagate website, the GoFlex Net CAN be accessed as a networked device. The network name is supposed to be the letters 'FADS' followed by part of the MAC address. In my case, that name never showed up - so I went to my DHCP server to verify that the name hadn't been registered, and it hadn't. I did find the IP address in use by the GoFlex Net through some experimentation, but couldn't use it to access the device through either Win7 Explorer or Internet Explorer (I figured http was a long-shot, but tried it anyway).

It is possible that other people will have better luck accessing this directly, but I couldn't get it to work in my environment.

After giving up on direct access, I gave in and activated the GoFlex Net using the Pogoplug service. The activation was easy; and, after playing with the interface for a bit, I can see that there probably is a specific class of users that will appreciate this device. It is easy to access data on the docked drives through the Pogoplug web interface, so you could have your data available from anywhere you have an Internet connection.

Overall, if you're looking for a dock that will work as a type of NAS device, you should steer clear of this. If you simply want some storage that is available from anywhere you are, then this is probably a reasonable solution.
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55 of 57 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Does work as NAS with simple setup if you know how., June 8, 2011
By 
Robert Bruhn (Tallahassee, FL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
I read the reviews, as well as performed searches online, before buying the Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex Net STAK100. Specifically, looking for a way to use it as a NAS and not fiddling around with Pogo.

A simple search on the net gave me this link:
[...]
Though titled for dockstar, this works for the Go Flex Net as well. The instructions are posted on the site in one comment, with some modifications I added. I'm on Windows 7.

1) Take a Seagate Go Flex harddrive and plug it into your computer.
2) Open Notepad and paste the following into a new document:

servicename=yoursharename
xcode.metadata=never
xcode.thumbnail=never
xcode.stream=never
cifs.mode=rw

"yoursharename" for example can be "dockusb1" for one hard drive #1, "dockusb2" for hard drive #2, etc.

3) In Notepad, go to "save as" and save to your Seagate drive root as .ceid
(make sure to pick "all files" as the save as type from the drop down in the save dialog box)
4) Plug the Net STAK 100 into the router using the ethernet cable.
5) Take your Go Flex harddrive, plug it into the unit and power it up.
6) In Windows 7, Click Start/Windows icon -> Click Computer.
7) In the window that opens, click Map Network Drive.
8) Choose a Drive letter, then Browse, and navigate your network. You should see something like FADSXXXXXX, where XXXXXX are the last 6 numbers/letters of the MAC address on the back of the Net STAK 100.
9) Click to expand. You should see a folder with the same name you assigned as "yoursharename" in the .cied file, followed by an underscore (e.g. backup_).
10) Select that folder, click OK. Click Finish in the Map Network Drive window.
11) You should not see it in Windows Explorer. If you want to name it something nice, right click on it and select "Rename."

As of right now, I'm doing a differential back up to my portable Seagate drive with a transfer rate of 450Mb/s.

So yes, it does work as a NAS. I did not want all the fancy web stuff or internet access. Simply a drive I can plug/unplug, and take with me when I need to travel. All backups are now going to be done automatically over my wireless network when I'm home.

Good luck.
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59 of 62 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Useless Device, September 22, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
First, you must understand that this is not a network storage device as it is marketed. IT is a media storage device. It is not designed well for doing backups of your own personal storage and your own personal data.

The product uses Pogoplug to manage the device. All configuration is done through the internet through the pogoplug website, not directly with the device. Therefore Pogoplug in some respect - owns the access to your data.

It is hard getting technical support because Pogoplug manages the software while Seagate manages the hardware support. To make matters worse, documentation, as mentioned by other posts, is absolutely terrible. Very little information online or through the software itself.

On to the review...

In order to use this device with windows or Mac, or even Linux, you need to install the pogoplug software - this will create a "pogoplug share" on drive "P" for your computer. This share is password protected. The problem comes if you have other computers or devices on which you cannot install this software on - for instance other media devices designed to connect to your network. Furthermore, software packages do not recognize this "pogoplug share" including Window's own Windows backup software that comes with Vista and Windows 7. Therefore it is impossible to backup to this device with Windows 7 backup software.

There is, however, another way to access the data. You can create a WFS share through the pogoplug website. You must know, however that this method does not have ANY security whatsoever. There is no username, and there is no password. You basically let all the data on the pogoplug completely open on your network. Anyone who gets access to your network, even with a network cable, can see, modify, and destroy any of your data simply because there is no password whatsoever. For a more practical example, any of your children can accidentally delete everything on the device from their computer because EVERYONE with access to your network has 100% access to the data. This method does, however, allow all windows software to get access to the data.

Interestingly enough in the "security" tab has an option to use secure connections for all access to your data. This however, does not apply to the WFS share (which they don't tell you). The whole experience leaves me feeling a little bit duped.

Technical support specialists told me that if I really want secuirty I need to make sure I have a good internet router. This is a huge change from industry best practices.

So basically device security and interoperability with software and other devices is mutually exclusive. Simply put, you must decide whether you want security or access.

The device, does, however work well as a media device, like a media server on your network, and has methods of allowing you to access the data securely from anywhere in the world. This is it's one redeeming quality.

Yet, for a network Accessable storage device, look elsewhere. I bought two 1 tb drives along with the device - spending well over $400 - hoping to get a network accessable storage device, and today I am VERY sorry that I spent the money.
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great niche product but not a NAS or backup solution, October 2, 2010
By 
Paul (SF Bay Area, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I spent a week playing with the Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex Net STAK100 before writing this review. This is one of those products that is there to fill a particular need. If you don't have that need then you're not gonna like. That's all there is to it. The GoFlex Net is not a NAS, although it can be used like one and it's not a local backup solution, although it can be used like one. It's really just simple way to share files and media from your home network to anyone out there on the internet.

Here's how it works: since it's just a Seagate branded Pogo plug you plug it in and register. Once you've done that you can access the device and the drives through your browser or your windows network. That's all there is to it. It's slick and simple.

On the plus side
+ The device itself is completely silent. The only noise is from the drives you plug in
+ It's hackable and you can replace the stock OS (take a look a OpenPogo and the Plugbox Linux but be warned that the GoFlex net is not fully supported yet)
+ Power consumption is very low (5W)
+ Unlike other networkable devices you can de-register and have someone else register easy
+ It's easy to enable root access via SSH
+ Easy access via network without relying on the Pogoplug service (but you do need to register the device to be able to enable Windows file sharing)

On the down side
- It's really just a rebranded Pogoplug and based on your needs you may be able to get more for your money by buying a Pogoplug or a Sheeva plug
- What makes it easy to use also creates a security nightmare. It uses UDP hole punching on port 4365 to enable two way communication with the device from the internet whether or not you explicitly enable it. The only way to prevent that is if your router/firewall prevents outbound connections by default. Most don't.
- To fully take advantage of the GoFlex you need to use GoFlex ultra portable drives that plug right in. On the plus side, if you do purchase these drives they are usable via USB without the FreeAgent GoGlex.
- Need to go to the Pogoplug website to safely eject a drive
- Only one USB port

So... if you're looking for small, ultra-quiet, ultra low power computer to host files and media that you want to access from anywhere on the internet with minimal configuration then this is for you. But if you are looking for a NAS or backup solution then keep looking.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK, But There's Better Bang for Your Buck, August 26, 2010
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Overall:
I can rate this Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (STAK100) at only an OK 3 stars out of 5. It's a nice looking, small, quiet, low power (I've seen references on the web to 10 watts measured) package that's very convenient to set up and use. It's also really nice having remote access across the internet to the files on that drive. Leaving it at that, I could probably live with the slow transfer rates (about the same as a local USB drive) with their drive application off. But, with that application on (and it needs to be on for their backups), the writes to the disk are just too slow. An alternative combination that provides about twice the throughput (and a lot more capabilities) for only about 25% more cost than this combination might be the QNAP TS-110 1-Bay Portable Network Attached Storage coupled with a Western Digital 500 GB SATA OEM Desktop Hard Drive WD5000AADS (Caviar Green). Below, you'll find my supporting numbers:

Product Description:
- The Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (STAK100) that I got from Amazon Vine included a Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex 500 GB USB 2.0 Ultra-Portable External Hard Drive STAA500100 (Black). I assume this does NOT come with the regular product.
- The STAK100 includes a 78" long CAT5E Ethernet cable and a power brick with a 68" long power cord.
- The (normally not included) STAA500100 includes a USB connector with a (too short) 14" cable.

Getting Started:
I plugged the Ethernet cable into the STAK100 and my TRENDnet 5-Port Gigabit GREENnet Switch (5 x 10/100/1000Mbps Auto-Negotiation, Auto-MDIX Gigabit Ethernet Ports)TEG-S5OG (Black) and then plugged in the power. The little green dot in the center of the base blinked quickly for about 20 seconds, went dark for another 5 seconds, and then lit solid green thereafter. That meant I the unit was up and running and I could go to the registration web site and register the device.

The Seagate registration site asked for my name and an email address. It then redirected to a Pogoplug web page for the rest of the process (since everything is done from a Pogoplug site, I assume they manufactured the device for Seagate). That site sent me an email where I had to click on a link to finish the activation. Once I did that, it activated the Pogoplug plugin and I could manage the device from my browser (Firefox).

I then stuck the STAA500100 drive into one of the proprietary slots in the STAK100. After about 8 seconds, the status bars for the light lit up solid indicating that it was ready for operation. From about two feet away, I couldn't hear any noise at all. If I put my ear right up to the drive, I could hear a sort of quiet rumbling sound.

As expected from the manual (not included, but findable on Seagate's site), the drive didn't show up on the network. I went back to the Pogoplug page in my browser and told it to refresh. Up came the drive in the browser (still nothing on the network, though). The device and the drive is fully manageable from that interface, but I wanted to test things outside of the browser. So, I followed the instructions in the manual to set up Windows File Sharing on the drive (from the Pogoplug page, go to Settings | WFS | Set to Active). The STAK100 and drive then showed up in Windows Explorer.

Speed:
For testing the speed of the STAK100, I copied a single 828 MB file and all my music files (1,217 files equaling 2.93 GB) back and forth under various configurations. Very broadly speaking, the speed of copying files to and from the STAK100 across the network in the proprietary slot were about the same as doing the same to any drive via a local USB connection (roughly 20 MB/sec to the drive and 30 MB/sec from the drive). Using the USB port on the back of the STAK100 instead of the proprietary slots basically reduces those rate by about 25%. Note that at no point do the transfer rates ever come remotely close to any of the theoretical numbers for the drives, network, or USB ports. But, surprisingly (to me, anyway), this is true with a regular old docking station connected via the same ports. As a reference, copying to an internal hard drive in another computer across a fully Gigabit network happens at about twice these speeds. Using an eSATA connected external drive is about 4 times faster. Specifically:

- Mounting the STAA500100 in one of the proprietary slots on the STAK100, the rates were:
-- Single file to drive was about 24 MB/sec
-- Single file from drive was about 36 MB/sec
-- Music files to drive was about 20 MB/sec
-- Music files from drive was about 28 MB/sec

- Mounting the STAA500100 in the USB 2.0 slot on the STAK100, the rates were:
-- Single file to drive was about 15 MB/sec
-- Single file from drive was about 29 MB/sec
-- Music files to drive was about 14 MB/sec
-- Music files from drive was about 23 MB/sec

- Mounting the STAA500100 to a USB 2.0 port on my local computer, the rates were:
-- Single file to drive was about 30 MB/sec
-- Single file from drive was about 36 MB/sec
-- Music files to drive was about 24 MB/sec
-- Music files from drive was about 30 MB/sec

- Mounting a WD6401AALS to the USB 2.0 port on my Thermaltake BlacX eSATA USB Docking Station or on my ICY DOCK MB559US-1S External 3.5" eSATA/USB 2.0 Hard Drive Enclosure to my local computer, the rates were:
-- Single file to drive was about 30 MB/sec
-- Single file from drive was about 36MB/sec
-- Music files to drive was about 22 MB/sec
-- Music files from drive was about 30 MB/sec

- Going across my Gigabit network to an internal drive on another computer, the rates were:
-- Single file to drive was about 92 MB/sec
-- Single file from drive was about 80 MB/sec
-- Music files to drive was about 40 MB/sec
-- Music files from drive was about 52 MB/sec

- Mounting a WD6401AALS to the eSATA port in my Icy Dock MB559US-1S Docking Station on my local computer, the rates were:
-- Single file to drive was about 103 MB/sec
-- Single file from drive was about 92 MB/sec
-- Music files to drive was about 75 MB/sec
-- Music files from drive was about 72 MB/sec

Software:
The Pogoplug site also has a "downloadable application [that] is available that makes each drive connected to
your GoFlex Net look just like a drive that is directly connected to your computer." I downloaded the Windows 7 (x64) version and installed it without problem. It very nicely assigned the P: drive letter to the drive and provided a capability to automatically mirror files from the local drive to the STAK100 drives as they changed. I was very happy with this until I re-ran some benchmarks. In general, with that application running, writing to the drive (in the proprietary slot) slowed to the rates seen for using the drive in the STAK100's USB connection. If the drive was actually using that USB connection, it basically cut that write rate in half. Specifically:

- Mounting the STAA500100 in one of the proprietary slots on the STAK100 with the application on, the rates were:
-- Single file to drive was about 15 MB/sec (vs. 24)
-- Single file from drive was about 40 MB/sec (vs. 36)
-- Music files to drive was about 13 MB/sec (vs. 20)
-- Music files from drive was about 25 MB/sec (vs. 28)

- Mounting the STAA500100 in the USB 2.0 slot on the STAK100, the rates were:
-- Single file to drive was about 14 MB/sec (vs. 15)
-- Single file from drive was about 28 MB/sec (vs. 29)
-- Music files to drive was about 8 MB/sec (vs. 14)
-- Music files from drive was about 19 MB/sec (vs. 23)

That presents a bit of a problem since, according to the manual, the backup software that comes with the Seagate drives (the STAA500100, not the STAK100 ) requires the application to run. Windows Backup (in my Ultimate version, anyway) will back up to a network location (i.e., with the application off), but it won't keep more than one system image that way. So, if I wanted to use the Seagate backup solution, I'd have to suffer that slower transfer rate.

Internet Access:
One other important aspect of the STAK100 is that the browser interface allows the marking of directories and files as shareable across the internet. All it takes is the clicking of an icon, the selection of access rights, and the choice of requiring a password or not. The plugin sends an invitation to the person, they get an email with a clickable link in it and it's done. If you need that remote access capability, it's a great addition.
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22 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars BUYER BEWARE this is not what you think it is, December 31, 2010
By 
xaeinstein "xaeinstein" (Massachusetts & Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
This seemed so simple!
But it turned out to be a convoluted / misleading process / device.

A simple enough premise: take as many as 3 drives (one or 2 Seagates that go in the toaster-like holder and 1 generic USB device) and plug them directly unto your internet router via LAN CABLE. Bring up a UI in your wireless connected computer and access the data on the drives.

That's it.
NO server computer needed!!
Free service to boot...

- It sounds awesome, right?
How can you pass it up?
Well be careful what u ask for.

You'd think 1-3 drives connected to your router means your computer can read or write to/from them locally using your wireless (or wired) LAN from anywhere in your home and outside your home also.
Not so fast!

For starters the reason you need the "free web service" is because pogo copies all the data in the drive(s) unto their servers and that's where you read it from, **not ** from your drives. So your data has to populate the pogo services where it is accessed (hopefully) only by you. No where are you told that's what's happening.
The way it works is that the pogo website starts reading and downloading (sucking) all your stuff in your drives unto their servers creating a virtual copy on THEIR site.

If your drive has lots of files, you'll see your drive being read even when you are NOT using it. For minutes and hours at a time.

Meanwhile using the pogo UI, and drivers in a computer you access what you think is the data in your disks but is really a pogo copy in a pogo data center somewhere. Via the net.

What about writing/copying files? That's when it gets tricky and misleading.

I started by copying a file (a 6 minute long .MOV movie) from one of the drives to the other.
Pogo Software said it copied it. I could see it, read and run it from its new location.
Cutting to the chase, pogo sucked the file from drive A when it was copying it to drive B - BUT NEVER ACTUALLY wrote it to DRIVE B.
It told me it did - but in reality it only copied it to their virtual copy in THEIR disks back in California or wherever in the world they are.

When I pulled off the drives from the toaster and the net and attached them directly to my computer using a cable, the copy was *not* there in the second drive.
The original file on disk A was still there but *no* new copy on disk B at all.
Where was the file?
(it was at pogo).

To prove it, I disconnected the 2 drives from my laptop and popped them back unto the toaster.
Voila! the copied file (movie) magically reappeared in the second drive like if it really was there.
The pogo UI showed it as being there. The mapped drive O/S showed it as being right there in the other drive.
No indication at all the data was not on your drive but actually in a remote location mapped to look like your local drive.
As far as I could tell I had two files: the old one in drive A and the new copy in Drive B.
Except the one Drive B didn't exist.

Here's the misleading part, had I then deleted the file from "drive A" falsely thinking I had a backup copy on "drive B" I would had been up the proverbial creek.
And potentially out in the cold.

Sounds confusing?
It is!!!!
Deceitful? You bet!

That file that was never copied to the second drive, showed like it was. ONLY when plugged it into pogo.

If something happens to the mapping necessary behind the scenes (because you can pop drives in and out of the "toaster" device) you are out of luck.
Worse yet if I took the disk offline and tried to use it to restore it, again I would had been out in the cold, effectively losing my data.

So if you don't mind buying the device AND some harddrives (not included) thinking your data is in the drive in front of you but in reality is at a remote location then this device is for you.

If that's your plan, then why buy the drives in the first place??
False sense of security?
Why not just use a service and be done with it?
I use services like me.com (Apple) or Amazon, or Smugmug as off premise vaults.

In fact to be fair to pogo they invented their service just for that reason. You buy a "pogo wireles device" (diskless appliance) plug it to your computer, have it join your network and you can use it as a virtual wireless drive. There is NO data stored on the pogo device, only on the pogo mothership. But you know that.

Seagate probably started to develop a local network appliance, ran into issues and decided to turn it into a service, "a cloud" to make it work.
But most people reading this and buying the device will think they are buying a local storage thats available inside and outside the home which is literally *not* true.

Moving on, functionality wise, the UI on the web is kludgey - and the desktop app itself is flaky.
It looks and feels like 1980-1990 ethernet mapped drives on a browser.

Speed wise, you would think reading it off their server would be fast - it isn't fast enough.
Not fast enough as you would use a network drive. For example working with media, creating movies or processing photos is a non-starter.
The data has be to be streamed back to your house.
It's really good for playing MP3 and if you are lucky and have the bandwidth some movies.

In the end I returned mine for a refund.

Even in an era of Google hoarding and minding your data this is way too "1984-ish" for me and in the end misleading as to where and how the data is stored and accessed.
If you want to store data locally you should buy a harddrive and if you want to store it in the cloud buy a service.
This has the worst of both worlds sprinkled with confusion and potentially dangerous assumptions.

I'm not sure what need this device fills.

If you want to use the cloud, put your data in a service. If you want to put data in your own hard-drives on the network, sadly, this device won't do that, but make you think it does.
Bad dog.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Avoid the Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex Net STAK100, August 31, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
Normally I love the Seagate products, and maybe I got the bad one in the bunch, but the GoFlex Net does not work as advertised. Having a Local Area Connection is not enough to make this product work. You are required to have an Internet connection. And there is no option to configure GoFlex Net locally. You have to go to the PoGoPlug webpage. I purchased it with the intention of using it with my Seagate FreeAgent Theater+. It will only play 15 to 30 seconds of the video file before it loses connection and the movie ends. For the price I paid for the GoFlex Net and the 2 Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex 1 TB USB 2.0 Ultra-Portable External Hard Drive STAA1000100 (that are sold separately) I wish I had just purchased the LaCie Network Space 2.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is not a True NAS media sharing device., February 4, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
Cannot be used without third party software, cloud based storage system, pogoplug.
Pogoplug very poorly designed and supprted. Very limited functionality. Designed to handle low resolution audio and video. This prevented using the product as a true NAS to serve as a media server for a home network.
When I contacted Seagate they could offer no workarounds. Pogoplug support was poor.
I returned the device.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great for sharing files with friends over the internet, September 1, 2011
By 
Lisa Kirkley (Olive Branch, MS) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
Ok, first of all I have to say I'm not a technical whiz like some of these other people who have reviewed the Seagate GoFlex Net. I do know a bit about computers and I can do whatever I need to do on them, but am not a whiz at things like network storage devices or anything like that. I was sent the GoFlex Net to review on my blog, along with one of their GoFlex Ultra Portable hard drives. It has been awhile since I first had to set it up, but I remember it to be fairly easy. I did have some confusion when my hard drive wasn't showing up on my network and called Seagate and realized the Pogoplug software was not running on my computer at the time and you need that software running to access your hard drive from "My Computer".

I will say I rarely used the Pogoplug website in handling my files. I mostly did everything from "My Computer" transferring files directly to the Pogoplug (P:) drive. It then transfers your files to the Pogoplug website and you can share files with your friends that way. The only reason I ever went on the Pogoplug website was to input email addresses for my friends to share my files with. My friend was able to download music and videos from my Pogoplug account easily and watch them on her computer.

I am not sure what another reviewer was talking about, with transferring files between hard drives and having them not really show up on the second hard drive. I did try out the GoFlex Net with 2 hard drives hooked up and transferred files between them with no problem. When I plugged the hard drives directly into my computer all the files were there.

I do agree with other reviewers that this is not something to use for your sole backup. The GoFlex Net is a media sharing device which means you can share pictures, music, and movies with friends anywhere who have the internet. I kept another portable hard drive to run my complete backup on.

When you install the Pogoplug software you can set it up to automatically sync files from your computer to the GoFlex Net hard drive. That is one feature I really like, but then I also found that sometimes my GoFlex Net would be offline, or it wouldn't sync everything because it wasn't connected and I hadn't noticed. So when my last computer crashed, I was hoping I would have my more recent files on my GoFlex Net that I hadn't backed up recently, but when I checked the hard drive, I didn't have anything from the past month before my computer crashed. This is one reason I only gave it 3 stars.

Overall if what you're wanting is a way to share pictures, music, and movies with friends over the internet, this is a great product for you. If you're wanting a network storage device to run backups on, it's not what you want.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A networked file sharing device that's easy to set up and makes it simple to share and access files over the web, October 30, 2010
This review is from: Seagate STAK100 FreeAgent GoFlex Net Media Sharing Device (Personal Computers)
I make movies of my kids all the time, and like to share them with family. I've tried different methods to make that work - but usually it's kind of a pain for them to figure out how to get things. In most cases I've found that in the end the easiest way is to burn them a dvd and send it. Not anymore.

The Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex Net Stak provides an easy way to set up online file sharing. Anything you can put on a USB 2.0 external hard drive can be shared with anybody you like. You just send an email link and they can access, preview, and download the file directly. Plus, it's a cinch to set up - this is designed for simplicity. You don't need to be a power network user to make it work. Think of it as a private server, where you get to decide who has access to what, and that you don't need to be a sysadmin to run. Or think of it as a local version of a filehosting site for files of any size and where the only storage limit is the size of the external hard drives you decide to plug in - and where there are no advertisements, and no annual fees, and the "hard copy" of the files stays with you.

You plug it in to the wall, then plug it in to your network router, and plug in either one of the GoFlex ultra-portable drives (with the adapter removed so it connects via the SATA connetor) or a USB 2.0 cable from any external harddrive. Then all you do is go onto Seagate's GoFlex Net registration site and register. The site detected my GoFlex Net setup right away, and in a minute or so I was signed up and onto the Pogoplug site. It has a very simple and straightforward interface that shows all the files on your drive, and allows you to arrange them into playlists and slideshows. More importantly, it allows you to share either the entire hard drive or individual files with anyone you like. They'll get an email with a link to the Pogoplug site - where they can preview or download the file or files you've shared with them.

You can plug in one USB 2.0 drive, and there are also two ports designed to fit the Seagate GoFlex ultra-portable drives (like my FreeAgent GoFlex 1 TB) - though it might also fit other drives with 2.5" SATA ports. There's a little adapter in there that makes it ready to accept a plug-in 2.5" SATA port, but the adapter slides out, allowing for a snug fit when you drop in one of the ultra-portable GoFlex drives. So, it allows you to have three separate external hard drives connected at any one time, and any one of them can be changed out. They recommend ejecting it through the Pogoplug site before removing it from the setup. One thing I like about it is it doesn't seem to matter how the drive is formatted. It recognizes drives formatted for PCs or for Macs (or, either NTFS or HFS+ formatted drives).

This is a very simple networking solution for ordinary users. Advanced network users may want something that's more flexible and that they can set up for access in other ways than through a free account on the fairly straightforward Pogoplug site. The site allows you to do some basic things with files on your drive: create slide shows of photos and video, arrange them into folders, preview them, upload new files to your drive remotely, and share them. It doesn't serve every need - it won't allow you to setup your drive as a remote system backup, for example. While the GoFlex drives can be used with Mac's TimeMachine program, for example, the GoFlex Net setup won't allow you to run TimeMachine remotely. It's ideal, though, for sharing memory intensive video files, or as a way to have access to files you need occasionally but don't want to keep stored on your harddrive or your networked iPhone. Perhaps its a bit of a tradeoff between flexibility and ease of use, but it is very easy to use and does very well what it's advertised to do.
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