Buy New
$18.62
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.00
  • Save: $6.38 (26%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 2 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $3.61
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sealed with an Oath: Covenant in God's Unfolding Purpose (New Studies in Biblical Theology) Paperback – February 14, 2007


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.62
$13.27 $13.56


Frequently Bought Together

Sealed with an Oath: Covenant in God's Unfolding Purpose (New Studies in Biblical Theology) + The Climax of the Covenant: Christ and the Law in Pauline Theology
Price for both: $40.45

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: New Studies in Biblical Theology (Book 23)
  • Paperback: 247 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Academic (February 14, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830826246
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830826247
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.4 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #653,703 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Few will be the readers who will not learn a great deal . . . and who will not appreciate the firm but respectful way Dr. Williamson disagrees with his dialogue partners. And perhaps some of those who are much too indebted to atomistic exegesis, unable to see how the Bible hangs together, will glimpse something of the comprehensiveness and wholeness of God's self-disclosure in Scripture, and find their worship of the covenant-making God enhanced." (D. A. Carson)

About the Author

Paul R. Williamson is Lecturer in Old Testament and Hebrew at Moore Theological College, Sydney, Australia. He is the author of Abraham, Israel and the Nations and a contributor to The Land of Promise, the New Dictionary of Biblical Theology and the Dictionary of the Old Testament.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Peter A. Green on May 23, 2012
Format: Paperback
Read this and other reviews by me and other scholars at [...]

Sealed with an Oath is the 23rd volume of the series New Studies in Biblical Theology, edited by D.A. Carson. I have really appreciated other books in this series--those that I have read were excellent models of "Biblical Theology," and Williamson's book is no exception.

Overview

Williamson writes that "the aim of [this book] is to highlight the significance of covenant for biblical theology, and explore the role of this concept within God's unfolding purpose" (11). Later he expresses his hope that his study of covenant will also illustrate the unity of the Bible amidst its diversity, though this is not his primary purpose (19). Demonstrating an awareness of the danger of arguing for a "center" to biblical theology, Williamson is careful to insist that he is not arguing that "covenant" is the comprehensive theological theme, but rather is "one of Scriptures major theology themes." He sees this as an important admission, since much of the Bible does not seem to relate directly to the idea of "covenant" (e.g., wisdom literature; see 32).

The first chapter lays the groundwork for his subsequent discussion. He interacts with previous scholarship on the concept of the covenant, including Reformed (i.e., Covenantal) Theology, which he critiques for imposing the distinction between the Covenant of Works/Life and the Covenant of Grace (28). In this chapter he also defines "covenant" (berit in Hebrew and diatheke in Greek) as "a solemn commitment, guaranteeing promises or obligations undertaken by one or both parties, sealed with an oath" (43).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brian Collins on November 23, 2011
Format: Paperback
Williamson wrote an excellent work on the covenants in Scripture. He begins with a discussion of the concept of covenant in biblical and theological scholarship. He (rightly in my view) discounts the concept of an overarching covenant of grace. This approach flattens out the diverse covenants of Scripture. It is therefore better to speak of one "unfolding purpose" of God worked out through the various covenants. Williamson also argues against a covenant with creation or Adam. The biblical covenants begin with Noah. Williamson's treatment of the Noahic covenant, an often neglected covenant, is excellent. He also provides a helpful treatment of the New Covenant, which he sees as replacing the Mosaic covenant. To this point I have remained unconvinced by his thesis that Genesis 15 and 17 represent two Abrahamic covenants, one conditional and one unconditional. I also remain unconvinced by his mild supercessionism. Disagreements aside, this is a major contribution to the discussion of the biblical covenants and one to which I'll turn often in the future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Philip Taylor on October 1, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Recently, I was preaching on the Covenants at our church. The truth is that I had not studied this issue much since Seminary and I needed a good resource to lean on during my preparation to serve as sort of a "reminder" or "refresher course". This book provided that and more. It was a fair, balanced approach to the covenants. It was academic enough to get into the details but not so academic as to be useless for a pastor trying to do sermon prep in amongst all the other stuff we do. There is really a lack of good accessible resources on this topic from trusted theologians and most of what is out there centers on "Covenant Theology" rather than the covenants themselves. My usual starting point on a sermon like this would Theological Dictionaries, Bible Dictionaries etc. but they all came up lacking on this topic.

The content of the book is about 200 pages, plus a thorough bibliography. If you need to give yourself a quick refresher as I did, you can easily skip portions of each chapter when the author launches into several pages on a particular theological debate related to one of the covenants, or takes several pages to go deeper than you need to go. If you are writing a theology paper for seminary, you'll find those sections helpful and interesting. You could easily read about 100 pages of this book and get a really good handle on it. (And by the way, you really can preach a 45 minute sermon encapsulating all the covenants . . . I did!)

For non-pastors or non-academic types . . . the language here is not overly heady, or overly bogged down in the original languages. I would feel comfortable recommending this to any lay person who has reasonable reading skills.

And you can't really go wrong with a book edited by DA Carson.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This book follows the covenants which God has made with people throughout the Bible. It begins with Noah, then Abraham, Moses/Israel, David and the new covenant. The beginning of the book helps to flesh out a definition for the word "covenant" since it can be a rather nebulous idea. He defines a covenant as: "a solemn commitment, guaranteeing promises or obligations undertaken by one or both parties, sealed with an oath." After defining what a covenant is, he spends the rest of the book surveying the major covenants in the Bible. The strength of this book comes in its extensive exegesis, which is undertaken on each of the covenants. The author is particularly strong at helping to explain each of the major covenants in the Old Testament. He walks us through the text of each of the major covenants and deals with any exegetical questions which arise from the text. The final three chapters of the book deal with the new covenant in its Old Testament proclamation, its New Testament discussion and the ultimate, future fulfillment which is to come. I found his New Testament discussion and exegesis to be much more brief and cursory than that of the Old Testament but found extremely helpful insights throughout the book.

Overall, I would strongly recommend this book to anyone looking to survey what the Bible has to say about covenants. It faithfully walks us through the Bible from cover to cover and thus lives out its stated goal of providing a Biblical Theology.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search