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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
People who fall in love with the concept of islands, or islomanes, should read this book. There are ten or so short stories about tropical and not-so-tropical islands around the world. The islands must have less than 10,000 people living on them, and include Robinson Crusoe's island, a Spice Island, an island in the Long Island Sound, One of the Bay Islands off the Honduras, and Niihau, the private Hawaiian island near Kauai.

Other interesting island books include A Serpent in Paradise, about Pitcairn Island, and A Trip to the Beach, about the authors plans to open a beach restaurant in Anguilla.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The author presents and enjoyable book about different islands from the standpoint that many of them have a personality of their own. I have often thought it would be nice to live on an island...that is a remote island. Maybe that's a bit of a pipedream...but this author sure got me thinking again how that might just be the thing to do to renew the spirit and rejuvenate the soul. This book is not for everyone...but it may be just right for readers with an inquisitive interest in an 'island attitude'.
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on August 2, 2008
Buy this book. Save a bundle on your vacation and cruise. Clarke shows you there are no islands left. They are all Marriots with shopping malls and water slides and fake cuisine. You are served and your room is cleaned by the grandchildren of people who used to be royalty on these islands.

Want to go to an island? Go to Clarke's; he found them hours before extinction. Appreciate your own special island: your home, your family, your neighborhood.
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on November 19, 2001
I had to chuckle as I browsed the book. In the area of the Pacific with which I am familiar, I found Mr. Thurston's writings were pure fantasy. Not to say he was devious or untruthful. He was just repeating the old myths that have been going around for years. I'm sure his personal experience with the islanders was pleasant. But having lived there, I can assure you the truth is a bit different.
The biggest myth the islanders propogate is their relationship with the Japanese during WWII. I had the pleasure of dining with the senior enlisted Japanese soldier who was stationed there during the war. He was on very friendly terms with one of the elected officials who had been his house boy. They spoke together in Japanese and reminisced all during the meal. At the end of hostilities, there was never any order to massacre the inslanders. Even if there were, the Japanese were near starvation and could never have executed such an order. I was told that in Japan there are veterans groups who visit these islands regularly, although I don't know that for a fact.
There is absolutely no industry whatsoever on these islands. The locals live off of what they can scavange from the jungle or catch from the ocean. I've seen families fight over who has rights to certain fruit and coconut trees. They are extremely friendly toward outsiders since to live permenently in the United States they need a sponsor. They also understand how paternity law suits work and the women are more than willing to claim their next born as yours.
It's very nice to read these stories about how quiet and peaceful these island settings can be. And how friendly and accomodating the inhabitants are. But these are just myths propogated to enhance tourism. I would encourage everyone interested to read the book and then visit just one island to compare. It will advance your understanding of these places immensely.
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3 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on June 6, 2001
I like to lie on the beach and disappear----this book took me to another time and place. I shall be reading it again lying on the sands of the Grand Cayman----I say, read it feel the sun on your pale skin....take the one you love.
Crusoe- the romance is in us all. Even if u lie in your own backyard this summer--read, feel Father sun on your pale flesh longing for freedom. Adventure is there, close your eyes.......
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5 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on April 27, 2001
Pompous, patronizing, hypocritical - this book is all surface and no depth. Its too bad the author used so much energy to write it. The author is immersed in self in each vignette, thus sees his characters in only two dimensions. He sees his islands with the same perspective as the Luddites. It could have been a wonderful read.
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