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Seasons on the Pacific Coast: A Naturalist's Notebook Hardcover – September 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books (September 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811820807
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811820806
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 1 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,477,621 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In 40 personal essays, naturalist Tweit (Seasons in the Desert) evokes the beauty of the Pacific Coast by describing some of the region's unusual plant and animal species. Species profiles are grouped by season, and each opens with factual information about the plant or animal's common scientific name, range, habitat, size and color. Despite the strong regional focus, Tweit's meditative, well-researched essays should interest most nature lovers. From the strange feeding habits of the gray whale (lying on its side on the sea floor sucking up mud "like a huge vacuum cleaner") to the clever defense system of Spanish shawl sea slugs (which borrow the stinging cells of their prey), Tweit highlights the "vibrant and magical diversity" along the Pacific Coast. She aims to create a "family album" of the variety of characters inhabiting the 2000 miles of coastline from Vancouver, British Columbia, to Tijuana, Mexico, and to rekindle a sense of connection with these "wild relatives." Although the seasonal connections are not always clear and the essays sometimes wander, Tweit's personal observations and lyrical style are appealing. A bibliography of recommended books and a list of places to visit make it possible for interested readers to use the book as a field guide as well. Illustrated by James Noel Smith. (Nov.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

Informative but too-cute essays on the animals, plants, and sea life of the California, Oregon, and Washington coasts. NPR commentator Tweit, who lives in the Southwest, gladly admits to being an outsider to the Pacific coast region, a tourist to this shore. Small matter, for as a practiced naturalist and careful observer, shes done her homework very well, turning in careful observations on the life ways of kelp, sea lions, and starfish, among others. Organizing her short essays by season, she takes her readers on a leisurely tour of a 2,000-mile stretch of country, one that gives a strong sense of the wide range of ecosystems that border the Pacific. Regrettably, Tweit cannot resist the urge to be both treacly and preachy. Does any reader of nature books, anywhere, need to be told that we forget, at our peril, that nature is the air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eatit truly is our home? When she sticks to straight description, however, Tweit is very good, and readers who tiptoe through the minefield of sentimentality can learn quite a lot about such denizens of the cold Pacific as eelgrass, which nourishes the inhabitants of the coasts tidal marshes, among the most fertile ecosystems on earth; sand dollars, echinoderms that suspend themselves in tidewater to feed on tiny organisms; and sea otters, which, Tweit writes, control the population of sea urchins, which in turn, if left unchecked, can clearcut whole giant kelp groves, their insatiable grazing denuding the once lush forests of the ocean bottom. (Even so, she adds, abalone fishermen kill otters indiscriminately, holding that otters devour fish that ought rightly to wind up on humans tables.) Good science meets bad poetry to make a nature book thats just so-so, but that may be of interest to some beachgoers. (illustrations) -- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

More About the Author

My training is in field ecology, the study of the natural communities that make Earth a living planet. I once spent weeks in wild places studying grizzly bear habitat, wildfire patterns and sagebrush communities. I turned to writing when I realized I loved telling the stories behind the data more than collecting those data.

I'm the author of twelve books that explore the interrelationships that form what Aldo Leopold called the "community of the land." My work has appeared in magazines and newspapers from Audubon and Popular Mechanics to High Country News and the Los Angeles Times - and has been heard on the Martha Stewart Living Radio Network.

I've taught workshops at colleges, universities, and writing festivals from University of California-Riverside and Miami University of Ohio to Wofford College in South Carolina, as well as at home and online. Audiences as diverse as the International Xeriscape Conference, Collegiate Peaks Forum, Monte Vista Crane Festival, and the Walking Words Writing Festival have called my talks "inspiring" and "insightful." I coach individual writers, review manuscripts for university presses, and contribute to "The Perch," the blog of Audubon magazine, and Story Circle Network's "HerStories" as well as my own blog. My current teaching and speaking schedule is on my web site (susanjtweit.com).

I'm a Quaker, a step-mother, a daughter, a sister, an aunt, a mentor & mentee, and a friend. I belong to an informal network of writers and artists who speak for the land, and to Story Circle Network, Women Writing the West, ASLE, and Colorado Author's League.

I'm a passionate gardener: I grow my own vegetables, fruits and herbs, and also enjoy the challenge of native plant restoration and "wildscape" design. My designs have been featured in the Rocky Mountain News, Zone 4, and on garden blogs. Take a look at the slide shows on my web site (susanjtweit.com).

I live with my husband, sculptor Richard Cabe, in a house heated by the sun--the sun generates our electricity, too!--on a reclaimed industrial parcel in a high-desert valley tucked in the shadow of the tallest stretch of the Rocky Mountains.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 6, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Seasons on the Pacific Coast takes the reader by the hand - with childlike delight - to show us the stunning natural diversity of this vibrant shoreline world. To me, a gentle tone and wealth of scientific information make Seasons a volume to savor for the casual visitor or native naturalist. Tweit presents short, engaging profiles of individual species which, taken together, tell the larger story of "connection that binds humans and wild lives everywhere". Rather than preaching conservation, she instead encourages us to look at Seasons as a "family album", renewing our sense of kinship with a whole coast of fascinating characters. I particularly love the exquisite watercolor illustrations that highlight each chapter. It's a lovely read.
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