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Secret Asian Man (Signed Copy) Unknown Binding – January 1, 2004


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Cherry Grove Collections (2004)
  • ASIN: B00839JEIO
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)

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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Sasha Ramirez on May 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
I've just begun my first year in an MFA program in poetry and my teacher recommended I read this book and she was absolutely right that I would enjoy the poems in Secret Asian Man! In fact, it may have changed my life and I only wish I could write like this amazing poet. The main character Ang Tunay na Lalaki embodies the struggles many immigrants have gone through. In stanza after stanza, the imagination is wedded to pure expression. This book will inspire you!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
These poems read like a novel in verse--we see The Real Man arrive in New York, fall in love with the city, and then fall in love with a woman who's just as quirky and complex as he is. This read is indeed a trip through the streets of NYC in the bohemian sense as seen through the fresh eyes of an outsider among outsiders. Nick Carbo's self-referential poem was risky, but he pulled it off. There is an experimental/metaphysical dialogue happening here that blows me away--you'll have to read the book to find out what it is. Highly recommend.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
A funny onion of a book. A multi-layered approach to writing *in opposition*, whether it's in opposition to cultural sources of oppression or literary dominant aesthetics. The collection is dedicated to Joseph Ileto, the Filipino-American postman murdered by a white supremacist simply because the murderer saw a stranger with a brown skin, yet Nick Carbo takes a non-heavy handed approach in skewering racism, making his poems all the more effective.
"Sally" (a female character in the book) -- if you don't treat Secret Asian Man well, I'll forego feminist sisterhood and go after him for myself. Anyone writing like Nick Carbo has got to be good in bed.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on August 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
One of the reasons I like to review books of poetry is it gets me out of the "ME" kick that poetry is too well known for. Ask yourself this: how many poetry readings have I been to where I spoke soley of someone else's work? Someone who is alive, but that I don't personally know? Not just to say that I like their work, but what I like about it and how it inspires me? Can I, as a poet, go for a month, talking about this person's work, pushing this person's book, without ever mentioning my own poetry? Poet Karla Huston turned me on to Nick Carbo's Secret Asian Man and he's the latest poet I'll be pushing. His new book is full of satyrical irony and poem after poem makes you both cringe and laugh out loud. This is one of the few books of poetry that I'd like to see Quintin Terrantino or the Zucker Brothers make into a movie. Carbo lives in two worlds, the American's and the Filipino immigrant's. But the reflections and dichotmy don't stop there. His main character is Ang Tulay Na Lalaki, is the Filipino version of the Marlboro Man. Carbo starts each poem off "Ang Tunay Na Lalaki..." does something. Like Lyn Lifshin's Mad Girl poems this gives the reader an instant image of who the main character is in a series format. Unlike Lifshin, Carbo forces his white American reader to face up to accepting a non-white- American name. In some poems he does shorten it to 'Lalaki' within the poem, again forcing us to confront our written prejudices. Carbo plays on both sides of the prejudice field. In one poem he criticizes American film makers for having no roles for Asian American Men (only women), while in another he pokes fun at a visiting Filipino friend who's accent is too thick.Read more ›
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