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The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4 30th Anniversary Ed: 30th Anniversary Edition Paperback – International Edition, February 28, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Michael Joseph (February 28, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141046422
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141046426
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.9 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Teen angst has never been such serious business--or this much fun! In his secret diary, British teen Adrian Mole excruciatingly details every morsel of his turbulent adolescence. Mixed in with daily reports about the zit sprouting on his chin are heartrending passages about his parents' chaotic marriage. Adrian sees all, and he has something to say about everything. Delightfully self-centered, Adrian is the sort of teen who could rule a much better world--if only his crazy relatives and classmates would get out of his way. The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole is a riot, and--although written more than 15 years ago--there is something deliciously timeless about Adrian's angst. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

One of literature's most endearing figures. Mole is an excellent guide for all of us Observer Marvellous, touching and screamingly funny ... set to become as much a cult book as The Catcher in the Rye -- Jilly Cooper A satire of our times. Very funny indeed Sunday Times

Customer Reviews

It is a great book for a teenager to read and very easy to relate to.
Liana Broomans
Adutls may also find this book a great read because they've already gone through adolescence and know what it is like to encounter the things that Adrian does.
Martha Stewart
I read 2-3 books a week and this is on my list to re-read again and again.
Edtex@AOL.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Paul Thomas on January 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
Firstly I wanted to clarify for people that might want to know, exactly how this series runs. I have bought and read all the books in the Adrian Mole series and I was dissappointed not to find anywhere to tell me which ones to get. So as a result I have them all.

US Versions
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4
The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole
Adrian Mole: The Lost Years
Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years
Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction

British Versions
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4
The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole
True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole
Adrian Mole: From Minor To Major
Adrian Mole: The Wilderness Years
Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years
Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction

So, as for the review these books are great. I love the entire series and I just couldn't stop reading them all the way to the end. The one thing I might suggest is to keep in mind that with most series of books the first is always the best, which is probably the case here too, but if you like it and are a fan of Adrian Mole, there is no reason why you wouldn't want to read the rest.

I like the fact that is it written in diary form for easy reading and it is very clever how the story is told from the point of view of Adrian himself but you can see things about his life that he cannot.

Overall an excellent read for all ages from teen to adult.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Charity Kingsley on January 3, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Adrian Mole is your average teenager. He's so average that it's hilarious to read how well Sue Townsend has been able to write his diary entries you'd almost believe he was a real human being. He has normal problems and normal anxieties. He wakes up in the morning not wanting to get out of bed and he goes up to the mirror and complains about his zits. His parents are hardly bothered with him and his best friend has everything he doesn't have-a loving family, richness and popularity. Unfortunately, his best friend has something else that Adrian really does want-Pandora...Adrian's crush and also Adrian's best friend's girlfriend. And yet all through this Adrian keeps wishes and hopes and especially those little dreams that as time goes by doesn't seem to have much of a possibility. This book displays his daily living in an honest and humorous sense of view that mixes very well with reality. For it is not only witty, it is very touching.
I recommend this book to people of all ages. I first read this book when I was 10 but at the time we were told that the content was not suitable. When I actually read it though it didn't actually seem too bad. And now at 14 and 3/4 I can still read it and find it amazingly funny. And many of the adults who have read this book seem to comment it as a very relaxing book that relives them of a LOT of stress. And seeing as this book as THREE others following after it, you'll certainly not regret having to finish the book for you'll be in for twice more fun in the next book.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Katrina Elizabeth on March 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
**Warning Spoilers**

Adrian Mole is a gifted 13-year-old boy living in England in the early 80s.

In this book Adrian tells the story about his "horrible" home life, his crush Pandora, his parent's split, trouble at school, his new eighty-year-old friend Bert, his acne problem, the Royal Wedding, and numerous other events. Even the most normal events turn tragic when Adrian and his family are involved.

Adrian reminds me of a Woody Allen movie. It's brilliantly funny and I recommend it to anyone.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua on November 21, 2006
Format: Paperback
It's 1981 : Margaret Thatcher is Prime Minister, Prince Charles is preparing for his wedding to Lady Diana Spencer and nobody in England has ever heard of the Falkland Islands. Meanwhile Adrian Mole, a spotty kid from Leicester, has a new diary.

Adrian is an only child and is only a few months short of his fourteenth birthday. Somewhat pretentious, occasionally insensitive and just a little dim, he has somehow managed to convince himself that he is an intellectual. (He claims to have read "War and Peace" within 24 hours - he thought it was `quite good' - while "Animal Farm" has led him to consider being a vet when he grows up). Almost inevitably, he's started writing poetry, which he occasionally sends to the BBC. Mr and Mrs Lucas, who live next door, cause something of a scandal when they become the first couple on his street to get divorced. (In fact, he's nearly delighted with the fallout, until his own family get caught up in it). These aren't his only problems, of course - he suffers from acne, his O-Levels and CSEs are looming and he's routinely menaced by Barry Kent at school. As a member of the Good Samaritans, a charity group he's joined, he misses his maths lessons on a Monday. The downside is that he has to help out an eighty-one year old war-veteran called Bert Baxter. Bert's drinking and smoking are bad enough, but the fact that Bert reads the Morning Star has led Adrian to suspect the pensioner is actually a communist. However, it's not all doom and gloom : Adrian is in love with Pandora Braithwaite .

This is a very funny book - it's always been one of my brother's favourites and I'm sure he wouldn't be alone in viewing it a modern classic. It is written as a diary, rather than a novel - each day is presented as a journal entry, with some days being given more detail than others. While it may be a little more accessible to those who grew up in the UK and Ireland in the 1980s, it's still very funny and is hugely recommended.
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