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The Secret Garden Paperback – December 10, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 258 pages
  • Publisher: Secret Press (December 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 161382307X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1613823071
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #641,229 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Mary is a tough feisty character, who manages to turn a whole household, and the lives of those in it, completely upside down... The book is brim full of magic and joy."
--Sunday Telegraph

About the Author

FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT was born in Manchester in 1849. After living in poverty, she emigrated to the US in 1865. She wrote over forty books; the best-known today are The Secret Garden, A Little Princess and Little Lord Fauntleroy. She died in 1924.

Customer Reviews

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See all 9 customer reviews
A moor boy named Dickon, teaches Mary about nature!
mld
This book is one of the few from this era that I actually enjoy.
Peety R. Arblaster
I bought a copy last year and finally read it recently.
sunflower 2

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
The secret garden is a wonderfully mysterious book. With Mary's ever changing tempers and an ill boy, plus the almost magical garden that Mary falls upon, there is always adventure and surprise lurking around the corner. I was generally very happy with the quality of the writing, but it was a little slow at some points. I think that plenty of children and adults would enjoy listening to the audio book much more, because it is less slow when you can hear and identify the personality and voice changes, that is, if done by a good reader. I recommend this book for the age group of 3rd through 6th grade. I think that any younger, you'd be very lost, and any older you might be less interested. All in all this was a great book and I give it 4 stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peety R. Arblaster on November 25, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is one of the few from this era that I actually enjoy. It is about Mary Lennox, a girl living in India during England's reign of it. She is very spoiled and is given everything that she wants except her parents' love. As a result she throws tantrums and acts horribly. After her parents die in a plague Mary is sent to live with her uncle Lord Archibald Craven in England.
The housekeeper, Mrs. Medlock, treats somewhat the way her parents did, as a burden that should be kept out of the way, only this time Mary is not given everything and is expected to look after herself. Martha, a teenager who works at the manor as a maid, is the only one who is kind to Mary. Martha's mother is the only person who pities Mary because she understands that Mary has been denied love all her life and sends Mary a skipping rope as a gift. Then Mary meets Dickon, Martha's brother, and they begin to become friends. Mary stumbles upon a gated up garden and finds the key in her dead aunt's room. Mary starts tending to the garden and bringing it back to life and in the process she brings herself back to life as well.
Eventually Mary meets Colin, her cousin, who is kept bed ridden and everyone believes will soon die. He throws tantrums as bad as the ones that Mary used to throw. Mary is the only person who won't tolerate his behavior. After allowing Mary to examine him Colin begins to believe that he is not ill at all, just weak. Soon Mary introduces Colin to Dickon and the garden.
With Mary and Dickon's encouragment and help and the secrecy kept by Ben, the only gardener who tended to the garden after Lady Craven died but had to abandon it for a few years because he became ill, Colin becomes healthy and starts to run around like a normal boy. They keep all this a secret from Mrs.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
And that's as it should be. Everyone should read this at least once every few years. It's heartwarming, it builds faith, and the message is one we all need. So much of sorrow and consternation is generated from perception. Looking at things with a can-do attitude can really make a HUGE difference in the outcome of a situation. And of course, the story is beautiful.
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By sunflower 2 on May 6, 2013
Format: Paperback
I really loved reading this book. I bought a copy last year and finally read it recently. The story is amazing and gets better as you keep reading the book.
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Format: Paperback
Mary Lennox is a 10 year old girl growing up in colonial India physically spoiled but emotionally starved. When she is suddenly orphaned, she is sent to England to live with her uncle Archibald Craven who, although not unkind, is wrapped up in the grief of a tragedy that hit him years ago - the untimely death of his beloved wife - and in a mental place where he can't even really help himself let alone his niece.

Although her uncle's manor is not an ideal place for childrearing, she does begin to open up to the cheerful young household maid Martha Sowerby and starts to thrive when she discovers a secret garden which has been locked up as it had a connection to her aunt's tragic death and meets Martha's wonderful 12 year old brother Dickon, who seems to have an almost Druidic connection to flora and fauna and becomes a best friend with whom she falls in love, although she's still too young to identify and process those emotions yet.

The garden is not the manor's only secret, however, and soon enough Mary learns of the existence of her cousin Colin, a boy about her own age who's been reduced to such a state of hypochondria that he believes he is going to die and his leg muscles have atrophied from disuse. On the way to mending herself, Mary resolves to also save her cousin and uncle with Dickon and the Secret Garden's help.

There is ample use of metaphors - the most prominent being the state of the garden corresponding to the mental and physical health of Mary and her two relatives and Dickon practically being an embodiment of the healing properties of nature in general and the Yorkshire Moors in particular - that may go over younger readers heads. But it is also very much a wonderful children's story about the power of kindness, friendship, love and nature through the lens of a very specific life-altering period in a young girl's life.

A must read for anyone who liked Louisa May Alcott's Little Women - and vice versa.
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