Buy New
$13.18
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $1.77 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Secret Water (Godine Storyteller) Paperback – February 1, 1996


See all 37 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, February 1, 1996
$13.18
$8.69 $3.99
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.99
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Secret Water (Godine Storyteller) + Missee Lee: The Swallows and Amazons in the China Seas (Godine Storyteller) + The Picts & the Martyrs (Swallows & Amazons)
Price for all three: $39.54

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Grade Level: 4 and up
  • Series: Godine Storyteller (Book 8)
  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: David R Godine; Revised edition (February 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1567920640
  • ISBN-13: 978-1567920642
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #235,332 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Fans of Arthur Ransome's beloved Swallows and Amazons series from the 1930s can enjoy yet another volume with the reissue of Secret Water, the eighth installment in the ongoing nautical adventures of the Walker and Blackett children (Swallows and Amazons, respectively), now camping out alone on a desert island. With black-and-white illustrations.

Copyright 1996 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Review

"Once more the Swallows and the Amazons have a magnificent exploring adventure; once more Arthur Ransome has kept a complete record of their experiences, terrors, triumphs and set it down with the cunning that casts a spell over new children and old." --Times Literary Supplement

More About the Author

Arthur Ransome was born in Leeds in 1884 and went to school at Rugby. He was in Russia in 1917, and witnessed the Revolution, which he reported for the Manchester Guardian.

After escaping to Scandinavia, he settled in the Lake District with his Russian wife where, in 1929, he wrote Swallows and Amazons. And so began a writing career which has produced some of the real children's treasures of all time. In 1936 he won the first ever Carnegie Medal for his book, Pigeon Post.

Ransome died in 1967. He and his wife Evgenia lie buried in the churchyard of St Paul's Church, Rusland, in the southern Lake District.



Photography (c) Arthur Ransome's Literary Executors & courtesy of the Brotherton Collection, Leeds University Library

Customer Reviews

A bonus is the large number of pen and ink illustrations, done by the author.
Carl Brookins
I read these books as a child and loved them all, I read them to my children who also loved the books.
glenstarrover
The plot of this book uses the usual Ransome themes, sailing exploration and a human sacrifice!
Paul H. Leek

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Steve Benner VINE VOICE on April 10, 2001
Format: Hardcover
After the excitement of "We Didn't Mean To Go To Sea", Arthur Ransome's eighth story in the Swallows and Amazons series returns to more comfortable and comforting territory. Set very shortly after the children's ordeal at sea in the previous volume, "Secret Water" finds the Walker children "marooned" on an island in the tidal area of Hamford Water, Essex. Here they spend a week or so, camping and surveying the low-lying islands, tortuous channels and tidal flats, whilst also having to deal with the quandary of whether to make friends with (or wage war upon) the local savage tribesmen. Once, of course, the small matter of one of their number being taken for a human sacrifice has been resolved!
This story is something of an attempt to return to the simple style of tale that worked so well with both "Swallows and Amazons" and "Swallowdale": a tale of children building a world of their own creation and at the same time learning to deal successfully with the real world in which they find themselves. After some of the more exciting later volumes in the S&A series, though, some readers may find the results just a little flat.
As always, though, Ransome weaves his tale through the deftest handling of prose and most adults at least should find this tale as charming as any the others in the series. It is nice, too, to see that the young Bridget is now able to start participating in the activities of her siblings.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Carl Brookins on January 13, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Naval Commander Walker, with the complete cooperation of his wife, their mother, maroons his five children on a tidal island on the coast of England. Of course, the children, ranging from the eldest, John, to the youngest, Bridget, are even more enthusiastic than their parents. It's summer vacation time again and the family is looking forward to a time camping and exploring the island. Then Commander Walker's bosses, the Lords of the Admiralty, decree his presence is required in London. All is gloom until Walker persuades his wife that these kids have demonstrated their responsibility and can be left alone for a time.
This is the eighth in an excellent sailing/adventure/camping series from this author. Like the others, Secret Water, is a careful chronicle of the Walker children's adventures. Along the way readers are treated to practical advice about camping, sailing, and dealing with tides and mud. This book also introduces new characters and reunites the Swallows and The Amazons. All of it is impeccably written with style, verve, great pace, a mystery or two and the sensitivity of the author to the attitudes and perceptions of children of various ages. This is a book that can be read by children of every age.
A bonus is the large number of pen and ink illustrations, done by the author.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on June 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
Secret Water is a great book!!! I'm a 10 year old boy and I love it. My favorite part is when they gather with their savage friends and have a big feast. Anybody would like it just as much as I did.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By W. Weinstein on August 9, 1997
Format: Paperback
Arthur Ransome¹s books are the perfect evocation of a British childhood between the wars.Set, to begin with, in the Lake District of England they follow the adventures of the Amazon pirates, Nancy and Peggy and the Walker children; John, Susan, Titty (presumably Letitia, we are never told) and Roger as they fight wars, endure hardships, discover treasure and force the hapless Captain Flint to walk the plank. Though quite old now, these books will never be dated because they talk to children in their own language, the language of desperate acts and dashed hopes, unexpected reversals and stunning victories. These pages are crammed with the joy of summer holidays, far from the drudgery of school and the unwanted solicitousness of anxious parents.Later in the series the action moves from the Lake District to the Fens, to Scotland, to the Caribbean and even to pre-Communist China. Throughout the series Arthur Ransome manages to introduce wildly diverse characters without ever losing the original threads that make these books so entertaining. If you buy nothing else for your eight year old reader this year, start him or her on this series with Swallows and Amazons
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Chrijeff VINE VOICE on September 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
Set immediately following the events of "We Didn't Mean to Go to Sea," this volume in the Swallows & Amazons series finds the Walkers once again sunk in gloom as their father, Cdr. Walker, has been denied his hoped-for leave, which will apparently prevent them from going on their planned family cruise to a region of marshes and islands suggested by their friend Jim Brading. Then Daddy gets his Great Idea: he and Mother will "maroon" the children (including Ship's Baby Bridget and Ship's Kitten Sinbad) with camping gear and provisions while they go up to London, and the "shipwrecked sailors" will explore and chart the unknown regions in which they've found themselves. The large island that will serve as their headquarters is surrounded by mud flats at low tide and has a farm (promptly christened a "native kraal" by Titty) near the middle of it, and with a small sailing boat of their own, the "Wizard," the self-sufficient and experienced Walkers anticipate no real trouble.

They've scarcely set up camp when they meet a local boy whom they dub "the Mastodon" (for the queer round tracks he leaves while walking with his "splatchers," a kind of snowshoe for use in mud) and learn that he's anticipating the arrival of his "tribe," the Eels, who camp on a nearby island every year for a spell of pretend savagery. (Why they're so late in coming--it's almost the end of the summer holidays--is never properly explained.) Then, to their astonishment and delight, the Amazons, Nancy and Peggy Blackett, join them with another small boat, "Firefly," and Nancy, as always, starts livening things up by suggesting that the explorers become blood members of the tribe.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?