Secret Keeper and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Secret Keeper Hardcover – January 13, 2009


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.17 $0.01

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 800L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 225 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (January 13, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385733402
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385733403
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 5.7 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,761,649 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In an intimate and absorbing drama about a displaced Indian family in the 1970s, Perkins (Monsoon Summer) vividly highlights the conflict between traditional Indian values and feminist ideals. After Ashas father goes to America in search of a new job, the rest of the family moves from Delhi to Calcutta to live in the more restrictive household headed by her grandmother. As often as she can, Asha escapes to the rooftop to confide her woes to her secret keeper, a diary; breaking the rules of the house, she also befriends the son of the family next door, who gazes at her through a window. But their relationship changes irrevocably when tragedy prompts Asha to make a painful sacrifice for the sake of her mother and sister. Readers may not always agree with Ashas bold decisions, but they will admire her courage and selflessness as she puts her familys needs before her own. Besides offering insight into Indian culture, Perkins offers a moving portrait of a rebellious teen who relies on ingenuity rather than charm to prove her worth. Ages 12–up. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From School Library Journal

Grade 7–10—In the mid-1970s, when her engineer father loses his job and leaves India to look for employment in America, 16-year old Asha; her 17-year old sister, Reet; and their mother move in with their uncle's family in Calcutta. Beautiful Reet attracts many suitors, and her uncle soon begins to look for a suitable marriage proposal. But impulsive Asha, who promised her father that she would take good care of her sister, manages to publicly humiliate the first serious candidate. Asha hopes to become a psychologist, but her aspirations are curtailed by her lack of finances and concern about the family's reputation. She finds solace writing in her diary, the "secret keeper," on the roof of the house. Here she befriends Jay, who watches her from a window in the house next door. He wants to become a painter and, to Asha's surprise, he takes a liking to her. Since conventions would not allow them to meet in public, he draws her portrait from a distance. Well-developed characters, funny dialogue, and the authentic depiction of spunky Asha's longing for romance and female self-determination, set in a culture that restrains women's choices, make this book an attractive pick for teenage girls. In the end, a surprising sacrifice by Asha demonstrates her emotional maturity and her love for her sister. An author's note explains the turbulent times during Indira Gandhi's regime that influence the narrative. Pair this appealing novel with Padma Venkatraman's Climbing the Stairs (Putnam, 2008), a similar story set in India during World War II.—Monika Schroeder, American Embassy School, New Delhi, India
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

I write novels for young readers, speak at conferences, schools, and libraries, and chat about writing, books, and life between cultures. Visit me on Mitali's Fire Escape (mitaliblog.com) or track me at twitter.com/mitaliperkins.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
Asha boldly makes some rash decisions in hopes of keeping Reet safe and happy.
Teen Reads
If you want to discover a book, that will pull your heart strings and makes you wonder... How much would you sacrifice to save someone that you loved?
Sarah Woodard
The best part about this book is the descriptive language that Perkins uses throughout.
Lawral Wornek

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Woodard on February 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Asha is the second daughter in a very traditional in a Bengali family in the 1970's. There are riot and jobs are hard to find. Asha's father is forced to go to America in order to find a job. Her sister Reet, her mother, and herself are going to Calcutta; They are going to live with her father's family. In Calcutta, Asia is trapped in her Grandmother's house. She is unable to go to school, because of lack of money. Her mother finds it disrespectful for her to go outside of the house, on her own. So her freedom is limited.
Asha finds relief in writing in her diary or as she calls it, her Secret Keeper. She tends to write on the roof, until she find out that her neighbor, Jay has been spying on her. He wants to paint her. Asha's sister, Reet has caught the attention of the young men in town. Many are their cousin's Raj's friends. Asha and her family are left with difficult decisions that would alter their life's.
I found this book to be well descriptive. The characters drew a hole in my heart from how life like they were and how the ending wasn't exactly what I wants. It was still amazing. If you want to discover a book, that will pull your heart strings and makes you wonder... How much would you sacrifice to save someone that you loved? It also was great at making Asha and It seem like real sisters. I really hope that you check this book out.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Carl Hofmann on January 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Mitali Perkins has done it again--but this time with an added depth and poignancy. Secret Keeper introduces twists of intrigue and surprise, along with real-world issues and emotion that resonate with readers of all cultures. This is not just for young adults--all ages will appreciate Perkins' way with words and her grasp of subtle nuance. Cross-cultural richness and great writing--I see "screenplay" written all over this!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Julie Peterson on July 12, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I have been on a huge YA kick lately -- it's like I just discovered a whole new genre that I absolutely adore. And I feel really lucky because all the YA books that I've read recently have been terrific. SECRET KEEPER by Mitali Perkins is no exception. I thought this was a very well-written novel with a very interesting story.

SECRET KEEPER takes place in India in the mid-70s when India is going through a huge state of change. I really appreciated how the author incorporated some of India's political history and other pertinent cultural pieces into the book. I love learning about foreign countries and their customs, and I'm pretty sure that young girls will enjoy that part of this novel too. Much of what Asha and her sister Reet experience in this novel will seem very odd to American girls who live in current times; however, what I truly loved about this novel is that young girls will still be able to relate to these characters. The feeling that Asha has about boys and becoming a woman are universal themes to all teen girls.

And speaking of characters, I couldn't help but fall in love with Asha and Reet. While both girls were very different, they had a love that can only be shared between sisters. I think they were brought closer by their father's departure and their mother's depression, and I liked that they confided in and unconditionally supported each other. Many of the supporting characters were also wonderful, and I especially liked their cousin and Asha's love interest Jay. These two characters especially were some of the only positive things in these girls' lives.

Asha was definitely my favorite character in this novel. She was a strong, brave, and intelligent; yet she also was able to give of herself to the point of self-sacrifice.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on March 16, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Mitali Perkins' SECRET KEEPER tells of Indian girl Asha and her older sister and mother, whose father leaves India to look for work in America. The women come under the jurisdiction of an uncle with all kinds of ramifications as Ma struggles with personal depression and her mother- and sister-in-law, Reet's beauty attracts unwelcome suitors, and Asha herself can't seem to hold the family together. A final novel of politics and personal courage set in India in the 1970s makes for an involving story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Teen Reads on March 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Times are tough in 1974 India. Poor people line the streets begging for money, and jobs are scarce. Sixteen-year-old Asha Gupta and her family are affected as well. Asha's father is out of work, and with no prospects looming, he decides to go to America to get a job. While he is away, Asha, her older sister Reet and their mother live with relatives in Calcutta.

Asha's uncle, aunt, grandmother and older cousin don't seem very happy to see them; only the younger twins are excited by their arrival. But with three extra mouths to feed, plus more bodies crowding the house, Asha can understand their resentment a little. What she can't seem to wrap her head around are the very strict cultural rules Calcutta insists upon, which are much more stringent than in the city of Delhi where she was born. She can't even walk down the street by herself. Stuck in the house day after day, loneliness gnaws on Asha's nerves, as does the lack of privacy. She makes her way up to the rooftop to pour out her heart in her journal. There she can confide her secrets, such as the devastation she feels at having to drop out of school, giving up her dream of studying psychiatry in college, and how she and her sister try to fight her mother's deep depression.

Then she meets the fellow next door. Jay is a bit strange, and for the longest time he would watch Asha through the curtains while she sat on the roof. Then they start talking, something else forbidden by her culture. Asha learns that Jay is an artist, and he wants to paint Asha. They become friends, forbidden ones, and Asha begins to feel even more for him. But then things go from bad to worse in the Gupta household. Asha's uncle starts looking to make wedding arrangements for Reet, and Asha is afraid for her sister.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?