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37 of 41 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Berlin 1972-1974
I was an Army Counterintelligence Agent stationed with the 766th MID in Berlin from 1972-1974. Having majored in German Language and Literature in college, I was involved in special operations from the beginning. I won't say anything about what I did, but I will say that Leland McCaslin's book was a very interesting and accurate account of some of what went on during...
Published on November 6, 2010 by Fred

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining but episodic
This book was entertaining. I enjoyed reading stories about real intelligence and counterintelligence activities in Europe during the years between the end of World War II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. There were many entertaining parts, such as the kidnapping of General Dozier by the Red Brigades in Italy in 1981, that I would be interested in reading a whole book...
Published on October 6, 2012 by Christopher Gleason


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37 of 41 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Berlin 1972-1974, November 6, 2010
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This review is from: Secrets of the Cold War: US Army Europe's Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities Against the Soviets During the Cold War (Hardcover)
I was an Army Counterintelligence Agent stationed with the 766th MID in Berlin from 1972-1974. Having majored in German Language and Literature in college, I was involved in special operations from the beginning. I won't say anything about what I did, but I will say that Leland McCaslin's book was a very interesting and accurate account of some of what went on during those years. My thanks to him!
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book for any vet interested in the intel ops in Europe, October 26, 2010
By 
Thomas A. Roberts "tomrgalvtx" (Galveston Island TEXAS United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Secrets of the Cold War: US Army Europe's Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities Against the Soviets During the Cold War (Hardcover)
My first assignment in the Army of the 60s was in an Armored Division headquarters near Stuttgart (4th Armored Div) and my recollection of the monthly intel briefings and that everyone has a responsibility to be aware of the surroundings whether on post or off. I returned to Germany almost thirty years later as a civilian (GS) and the warnings hadn't really changed except for the terminology and some computer related issues. Lee McCaslin does a great job relating his time in Berlin and Heidelberg at the Headquarters of US Army Europe. My recommendation is that the book be required for all Intel officers, NCOs and civilians assigned to intel units worldwide. Perhaps when more declassifications occur, Lee McCaslin can issue eiher a sequel or second edition with deleted information.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I didn't know that!, December 26, 2010
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This review is from: Secrets of the Cold War: US Army Europe's Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities Against the Soviets During the Cold War (Hardcover)
Lee McCaslin's "Secrets Of The Cold War" is a fascinating read for those of us who grew up during the Cold War and for those interested in what shaped today's world. Now that much of what went on then is unclassified, Lee and his contributors, who were there, give us glimpses into the daily lives of the dedicated people on both sides of the Iron Curtain and the struggles they faced during those tense and uncertain times. He shows us how the military, intelligence and counterintelligence communities were structured and their often humorous encounters. How did the term "Iron Curtain" come to be? Read "Secrets Of The Cold War" and you'll find out.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars the structure and operations of US European intelligence in the Cold War, November 15, 2010
This review is from: Secrets of the Cold War: US Army Europe's Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities Against the Soviets During the Cold War (Hardcover)
Leland McCaslin worked in a variety of U. S. military and government intelligence positions from about 1970 to 1996, including positions in Europe when the Cold War was going on between the Soviet Union and the United States and its European allies. Since the Cold War was not open warfare between armed forces, intelligence played a particularly important role for the U.S. in maintaining its readiness and in counteracting activities of the Soviet Union and its satellites the Eastern European nations. McCaslin writes about the structure and particular agencies of the intelligence services as well as operations. Often he lets others involved in the intelligence services speak for themselves in lengthy passages which are like journal entries. The mix of styles from sections like an administrative or bureaucratic manual on organization to vignettes by intelligence personnel with engaging details and dramatic situations gives the book an unevenness. But this is an incident drawback for any reader interested in unique details on this major area of Cold War espionage. Though U.S. intelligence operations are the main subject. Soviet intelligence operations receive a good deal of attention as well not only for thoroughness in covering the topic, but also so the reader can understand the context within which the U.S. intelligence services were operating.

McCaslin had the book reviewed by the National Security Agency (NSA) and other government agencies to ensure he was not inadvertently divulging any secret material even though considerable time has passed since the Cold War ended. If anything the author wanted to get in was kept out, it's hard to imagine what this was. For one finds all kinds of specific details the lay reader would not normally think about regarding intelligence services and their activities as well as what must have been at the time highly secret, daring missions. The 13-page Glossary provides an overview of intelligence agencies plus some terms such as "plausible deniability" and "false flag approach" having to do with principles and tactics of operations.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So Very Exciting!, October 19, 2010
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This review is from: Secrets of the Cold War: US Army Europe's Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities Against the Soviets During the Cold War (Hardcover)
Having great interest in the political and military struggles and intelligence work of today, it only makes sense to further investigate some of the inner workings of intelligence activity of the recent past. It's amazing to read the first hand accounts of some of these real world activities!!! Thank you Mr. McCaslin for your service!
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We were there, October 19, 2010
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This review is from: Secrets of the Cold War: US Army Europe's Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities Against the Soviets During the Cold War (Hardcover)
We were there!

As one of Lee's compatriots, I welcomed the news that Lee was fulfilling his long-time desire to write about the cold war. We were both fortunate to work and practice our trades within the Army Headquarters in Heidelberg, in addition to serving at other "cold war" posts.

I greatly appreciate Lee's effort, which brings to mind my involvement in many of the same activities, not to mention many other similar activities which are still cloaked by the mists of time and security.

Congratulations, Lee, and Thank You!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining but episodic, October 6, 2012
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This book was entertaining. I enjoyed reading stories about real intelligence and counterintelligence activities in Europe during the years between the end of World War II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. There were many entertaining parts, such as the kidnapping of General Dozier by the Red Brigades in Italy in 1981, that I would be interested in reading a whole book about. Overall, the book suffered from being too episodic, basically a string of first-person personal stories strung together. The book would have been improved with an overall outline of the history of the time.

Part of the problem may have been with the Kindle implementation. Sometimes it was hard to understand when a new author's part had started. The formatting of the book seemed a little off.

Overall, as I said, I enjoyed the book. It taught me more about a time and place that doesn't seem to get a lot of attention.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A trip down memory lane, December 24, 2010
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This review is from: Secrets of the Cold War: US Army Europe's Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities Against the Soviets During the Cold War (Hardcover)
I just finished "Secrets of the Cold War." I enjoyed it very much. Talk about a trip down memory lane! So many things in there that I remember as contemporaneous events. I have a feeling that Lee's book will become a reference resource for future Army CI folks, and a rich reminiscence for a lot of us ex-cold warriors.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bland, October 2, 2014
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This book has a few interesting stories and some good photos but offers little regarding secrets or compelling reading to make this an interesting cold war book.
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2.0 out of 5 stars A total bore., November 22, 2014
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Secrets Of The Cold War should have been titled, Boring & Insignificant Details Of The Cold War. I was expecting information on covert ops; what I got was stories about guys riding around on sight seeing tours. The book was formatted by an idiot: the pages are solid blocks of text, making it difficult to read and paragraphs are a page long. The reviewers who found this "fascinating" must find watching grass grow and paint drying "exciting." The book is also loaded with the alphabet soup thy the military holds near and dear to their heart: COMSEC, SMLM, ETC. I could add one more: POS. I love historical military books, but i couldn't finish this POS. Skip this snorefest. Especially at its bloated price...it's a dog.
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