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Secrets of the Exodus: The Egyptian Origins of the Hebrew People Hardcover – January, 2004

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About the Author

Roger Sabbah and Messod Sabbah are brothers and the descendants of a long line of rabbis and chief rabbis. The authors both live in Paris. Art and Lois Banta, the translators, live in San Diego, CA.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Helios Press (January 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1581153198
  • ISBN-13: 978-1581153194
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,028,805 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on March 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The collaborative effort of Messod Sabbah and Roger Sabbah (two French-Jewish researchers, who are themselves descendants of a long line of high-ranking rabbi), Secrets Of The Exodus: The Egyptian Origins Of The Hebrew People presents the boldly stated hypothesis that the ancient Hebrew people described in Exodus were not slaves from another nation, but rather Egyptian followers of that monotheistic pioneer and iconoclast -- Pharaoh Akhenaten. Secrets Of The Exodus deftly examine decades of linguistic and archaeological research that started a tremendous uproar in France when it was first published in 2000. A unique and seminal contribution to Egyptology, Secrets Of The Exodus may contain controversial ideas, but the authors approach them rationally and are well grounded in logical methodology.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By G. Kennedy on March 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I've always thought it totally implausible that a tribe would be allowed to go around ransacking cities and killing all their inhabitants for years without being confronted by one of the local superpowers e.g. Hittites or Egyptians .... they must have been allied to 1 or the other. Egypt makes sense ... so the exodus must have been planned/orchestrated ... makes a heap of sense. The analysis of the hebrew writing as a form of shorthand Egyptian is interesting. This book makes a lot of sense ... maybe too much matching up of Bible names and pharoahs ? who knows ... but the exodus makes a lot more sense in Akhenaten's time that Rameses ... good book, you will find yourself rereading the Hebrew versus Hieroglyphs section a few times ... its very intriguing
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sonia B. on May 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Please be aware that this book is the same as the Did the Pharaohs Write the bilble. Since the covers are different and the Title different I thought they were two different books and bought both of them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jose from Madrid on February 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The authors follow a purely scientific approach, and derive their conclusions with logic. All their statements are demonstrated in front of your eyes. The authors are two experts in each field they deal with (Talmud, the ancient scriptures, History). They take you by the hand until you reach by yourself a surprising conclusion that will leave you with your mouth open.

Read this book, Freud's essay entitled "Moses and Monotheism" and Velikovsky's "Oedipus and Akhnaton" to understand everything that can be explained on the concepts of religion, monotheism, and psychology of maturity and sexuality, and their mutual interrelations.

Indispensable.

Jose

PS. Not many comments mention that the book has a foreword by a master rabbi, praising it.
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Format: Hardcover
Anyone who DOESN'T think Egypt is central to Judaism is in complete denial and has their head in the sand. Pretty much EVERY SEMINAL, major figure in Jewish and Christian mythology was in Egypt at one time or another. Still this account takes way too many liberties of storytelling without any objective facts to back it up. The details of Pharaohs lives are not so definite as this book presents and has nothing to cite as a source like hieroglyphic or other accounts. Still there's a decent amount of pictures of actual hieroglyphs, Amarna and Pyramid text accounts here, as well as the Aramaic Bible which is pretty convincing. The idea of the Egyptians who left Egypt because of their Monotheism adoring Ay the Pharaoh is absurd though. What? they gave up worship of Aten, the one Hebrew(Egyptian) God for Ay the later Pharaoh who let them leave Egypt proper and settle as an Egyptian province in Canaan? No I think there was some sort of conflict there as in "The Moses Mystery" book.

Yes I believe Moses was an Egyptian priest of the new single God cult of Akhenaten but I'm a bit skeptical of Abraham being modeled on a Pharaoh. It's possible but I'm more inclined to think of Abraham as purely mythical, like everyone before him in the Bible. Now circumcision WAS practiced by the Egyptians in homage to Osiris and his missing body part as symbolized in every Obelisk you see, including those in St. Peter's Square in the Vatican and Washington's Monument in Washington DC. I do believe also that Hebrew is a hieroglyphic alphabet invented by the high priests of the Aten Egyptian God.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Dunyazad VINE VOICE on December 5, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I meant to finish this book before writing a review. It's so awful, though, that I don't know whether I'll ever make it to the end, so I thought a word of warning might be helpful to other people.

First, let it be known that I approached this book with an open mind. The idea that Moses et al. were (Egyptian) followers of Akhenaten, the pharaoh who temporarily imposed monotheism on Egypt, is a plausible one. Plenty of evidence for Akhenaten's monotheism exists, while there's no evidence for a huge exodus of slaves from Egypt.

Unfortunately, the author of this book seems to make no distinction between what's plausible and what actually happened. In his view, if something could have happened, then it really did happen. The book is full of leaps of logic of this sort, with few arguments that are actually convincing or even coherent.

I'm not sure who the intended audience of this book is, but I suspect that it may be for those who believe in a literal interpretation of Exodus. At least, that's the most charitable justification I can give for the fact that much more time is spent explaining why the exodus as described in the Bible didn't actually take place, as opposed to explaining why his own theory is correct. The less charitable view is that it's much easier to disprove the Biblical exodus than to prove his alternative theory, and by equating possibility with reality, proof isn't necessary anyway.

Either way, this book has an interesting premise and presents some interesting, if not conclusive, evidence; but for me at least, the faulty logic made it an extremely painful read.
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