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Secrets of the Exodus: The Egyptian Origins of the Hebrew People Hardcover – January, 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Helios Press (January 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1581153198
  • ISBN-13: 978-1581153194
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,390,620 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Roger Sabbah and Messod Sabbah are brothers and the descendants of a long line of rabbis and chief rabbis. The authors both live in Paris. Art and Lois Banta, the translators, live in San Diego, CA.

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Customer Reviews

I like it because IT MAKES SENSE!
Dorothy K. Morris
Some of this is speculative, and yet there is a lot of very convincing data, even hard evidence.
bdw000
A book referenced in history summaries.
Juan C. Larach

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on March 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The collaborative effort of Messod Sabbah and Roger Sabbah (two French-Jewish researchers, who are themselves descendants of a long line of high-ranking rabbi), Secrets Of The Exodus: The Egyptian Origins Of The Hebrew People presents the boldly stated hypothesis that the ancient Hebrew people described in Exodus were not slaves from another nation, but rather Egyptian followers of that monotheistic pioneer and iconoclast -- Pharaoh Akhenaten. Secrets Of The Exodus deftly examine decades of linguistic and archaeological research that started a tremendous uproar in France when it was first published in 2000. A unique and seminal contribution to Egyptology, Secrets Of The Exodus may contain controversial ideas, but the authors approach them rationally and are well grounded in logical methodology.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By G. Kennedy on March 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I've always thought it totally implausible that a tribe would be allowed to go around ransacking cities and killing all their inhabitants for years without being confronted by one of the local superpowers e.g. Hittites or Egyptians .... they must have been allied to 1 or the other. Egypt makes sense ... so the exodus must have been planned/orchestrated ... makes a heap of sense. The analysis of the hebrew writing as a form of shorthand Egyptian is interesting. This book makes a lot of sense ... maybe too much matching up of Bible names and pharoahs ? who knows ... but the exodus makes a lot more sense in Akhenaten's time that Rameses ... good book, you will find yourself rereading the Hebrew versus Hieroglyphs section a few times ... its very intriguing
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jose from Madrid on February 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The authors follow a purely scientific approach, and derive their conclusions with logic. All their statements are demonstrated in front of your eyes. The authors are two experts in each field they deal with (Talmud, the ancient scriptures, History). They take you by the hand until you reach by yourself a surprising conclusion that will leave you with your mouth open.

Read this book, Freud's essay entitled "Moses and Monotheism" and Velikovsky's "Oedipus and Akhnaton" to understand everything that can be explained on the concepts of religion, monotheism, and psychology of maturity and sexuality, and their mutual interrelations.

Indispensable.

Jose

PS. Not many comments mention that the book has a foreword by a master rabbi, praising it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sonia B. on May 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Please be aware that this book is the same as the Did the Pharaohs Write the bilble. Since the covers are different and the Title different I thought they were two different books and bought both of them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Juan C. Larach on May 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A book referenced in history summaries. Very insightful and carefully presented with evidence. A bit more imaginative than substantiated in the final chapter on the Masai.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Dunyazad VINE VOICE on December 5, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I meant to finish this book before writing a review. It's so awful, though, that I don't know whether I'll ever make it to the end, so I thought a word of warning might be helpful to other people.

First, let it be known that I approached this book with an open mind. The idea that Moses et al. were (Egyptian) followers of Akhenaten, the pharaoh who temporarily imposed monotheism on Egypt, is a plausible one. Plenty of evidence for Akhenaten's monotheism exists, while there's no evidence for a huge exodus of slaves from Egypt.

Unfortunately, the author of this book seems to make no distinction between what's plausible and what actually happened. In his view, if something could have happened, then it really did happen. The book is full of leaps of logic of this sort, with few arguments that are actually convincing or even coherent.

I'm not sure who the intended audience of this book is, but I suspect that it may be for those who believe in a literal interpretation of Exodus. At least, that's the most charitable justification I can give for the fact that much more time is spent explaining why the exodus as described in the Bible didn't actually take place, as opposed to explaining why his own theory is correct. The less charitable view is that it's much easier to disprove the Biblical exodus than to prove his alternative theory, and by equating possibility with reality, proof isn't necessary anyway.

Either way, this book has an interesting premise and presents some interesting, if not conclusive, evidence; but for me at least, the faulty logic made it an extremely painful read.
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11 of 16 people found the following review helpful By bdw000 on January 30, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Some of this is speculative, and yet there is a lot of very convincing data, even hard evidence.

Highly recommended.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jack Nodze on March 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Being a student of Bible scripture for the past five years, looking for answers, trying to discover the purpose of life and comprehend God's intentions for humanity--I gave up. For, instead of finding fulfillment in Holy Scripture, uncertainty and disbelief firmly grasped my thinking while interpretations of God's Word gushed forth from the mouths of holy men. God surely did not mean to make his message so hard to believe. Somehow the message was lost. The experts embellished the Holy Scripture and made it so great, so beautiful, and so virtuous that it was unbelievable and unlivable by humans, but after all they were only guessing! They didn't know God. How could one rely on them when their theories led to mysterious conclusions. Our accepted interpretations of Holy Scripture must be unfounded? The book "Secrets of the Exodus" made the truth obvious. Now one can understand why over the centuries archeologists could not prove the history of Abraham, Moses, and Joshua. These names are pseudonyms designed to conceal the Egyptian identities of Akhenaten, Horemheb, and Sety I. The Jewish people had denied their Egyptian origins in order to curry the favor of succeeding conquerors. Finally, Old Testament stories and theories set forth by Sigmund Freud's "Moses and Monotheism" have been unraveled.
Thank you Messod and Roger Sabbah! Also, as a reader of the "Biblical Archeology Review" in the March April 2010 copy there is an article "How the Alphabet was Born" which adds support to the authors' conclusions.
The revelation of a Egyptian origin for Israel is very important because it demonstrates the sway that the powerful have over the multitude and how history is changed to fit the times. It applies to how we see "Truth" today.
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