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Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth Hardcover – February 15, 2005


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Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth + Rich Dad Poor Dad: What The Rich Teach Their Kids About Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! + Think and Grow Rich: The Landmark Bestseller - Now Revised and Updated for the 21st Century
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness; roughcut edition (February 15, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060763280
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060763282
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (740 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,608 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Eker's claim to fame is that he took a $2,000 credit card loan, opened "one of the first fitness stores in North America," turned it into a chain of 10 within two and a half years and sold it in 1987 for a cool (but somewhat modest-seeming) $1.6 million. Now the Vancouver-based entrepreneur traverses the continent with his "Millionaire Mind Intensive Seminar," on which this debut motivational business manual is based. What sets it apart is Eker's focus on the way people think and feel about money and his canny, class-based analyses of broad differences among groups. In rat-a-tat, "Let me explain" seminar-speak, Eker asks readers to think back to their childhoods and pick apart the lessons they passively absorbed from parents and others about money. With such psychological nuggets as "Rich people focus on opportunities/ Poor people focus on obstacles," Eker puts a positive spin on stereotypes, arguing that poverty begins, or rather, is allowed to continue, in one's imagination first, with actual material life becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy. To that end, Eker counsels for admiration and against resentment, for positivity, self-promotion and thinking big and against wallowing, self-abnegation and small-mindedness. While much of the advice is self-evident, Eker's contribution is permission to think of one's financial foibles as a kind of mental illness—one, he says, that has a ready set of cures.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Eker, a multimillionaire, teaches us how to become rich. He believes thoughts lead to feelings, which lead to actions, which lead to results, and hence the key to attaining great wealth begins with thinking--like rich people do. He offers new ways of thinking and acting that will lead to new and different results, and he tells us, "Success is a learnable skill. You can learn to succeed at anything." The book emphasizes Eker's 17 principles for amassing wealth, which include: rich people believe that they create their life, while poor people believe "life happens to me." Rich people focus on opportunities, while poor people focus on obstacles. Rich people act in spite of fear, while poor people let fear stop them. Rich people constantly learn and grow, while poor people think they know enough. This is an obvious infomercial for the author's training seminars; however, although many may not agree with all of Eker's ideas, his book offers thought-provoking advice and valuable insight. Mary Whaley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Using the principles he teaches, T. Harv Eker went from zero to millionaire in only two and a half years. Eker is president of Peak Potentials Training, one of the fastest growing success training companies in North America. With his unique brand of "street smarts with heart," Eker's humorous, "cut-to-the-chase" style keeps his audience spellbound. People come from all over the world to attend his sold-out seminars, where crowds often exceed 2,000 people for a weekend program. So far, Eker's teachings have touched the lives of more than a quarter million people.

Customer Reviews

This book will change your life.
Lindsay Emile
He makes a good point about all the people who say they "just want to be comfortable"- that's all you will ever be; you will you never get rich with that mindset.
Designing Dancer
I stumbled upon T. Harv Eker's book Secrets of the Millionaire Mind during a very financially stressful time.
Darrell L. Weaver

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

817 of 859 people found the following review helpful By Carmen Matthews on March 22, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book, because it starts with allowing readers to explore their subconscious, childhood money messages that are sabotaging their chance of being wealthy.

The theme is written from the premise of your worthiness thoughts lead to your actions which lead to your circumstances.

"Wealthy." The meaning of "wealthy" indicates a great deal about who you are.

The wealthy at country clubs talk about a person's net worth. The middle class at other environments talk about the raise. And the poor talk about making it.

One of the most hilarious parts to this book is the example of what happens when someone says, "Oh! Money is not that important."

T. Harv Eker's reaction is to tap the palm of his hand on his forehead as he say's, "Oh! I get it. You're broke!"

To do this, without regard for whose around and what the social situation is, would definitely be life altering for the person who says that money is not important. (I actually can't imagine someone doing this in any situation other than if they are presenting a motivational workshop, where they are in charge.

But, nonetheless, imagining this happening was funny.

Beyond humor, this book compares the rich to the poor with these assertions:

1. Rich people believe "I create my life." Poor people

believe, "Life happens to me."

2. Rich people play the money game to win. Poor people

play the money game to not lose.

3. Rich people are committed to being rich. Poor people

want to be rich.

4. Rich people think big. Poor people think small.

5. Rich people focus on opportunities. Poor people focus

on obstacles.

6.
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410 of 453 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 12, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I wanted to believe - in Harv Eker - I really did. I have read many books on wealth building and self-improvement, and I have been very successful by following the principles taught by authors such as Brian Tracy, Tony Robbins, Napolean Hill, and Robert Kiyosaki, among others. I have applied their principles and found that they work. But these other authors provide something that Mr. Eker does not - substance.

The first 187 pages of this book are filled with shallow generalities and soundbites such as: "Rich people are bigger than their problems. Poor people are smaller than their problems." I don't disagree, but there is nothing to back up these simple "wealth principles" and little in the way of direction for implementation.

Still, this book could be an adequate primer for those who have had no introduction to the genres of wealth-building and self-improvement -- except for the continual pleadings to visit the author's website and attend his seminars. Yes, I know that authors in many fields often write books as a means to promote themselves and their other products, but I have never seen a book, other than giveaway promotionals, that so blatantly pushed the author's other products while providing so little in return. Like an infomercial, this book continually tells you what you could experience if you would only attend his seminar. And all those website freebies promised throughout the book? You must give him your name and e-mail address before he'll let you in. And after you do that, you must provide a credit card and pay a $100 deposit for that free seminar.

I'm returning my book tomorrow and getting my money back. For the same amount of money you can get BOTH "Maximum Achievement" (Brian Tracy) AND "Think and Grow Rich" (Napolean Hill).
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36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Lupa VINE VOICE on July 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is the latest in a bunch of books I've been reading in the past year to improve my financial skills. While I've been reading up on more solid things such as investment, managing the money I already have, and other financial planning-related topics, it's also good now and then to read a book that addresses the attitudes I have towards money, which do directly affect how I handle it.

I found this to be an incredibly valuable book for that reason. Eker doesn't tell you how to invest in real estate or play the stock market--in fact, he doesn't even give you specific suggestions for what to do with your money. What he does sdo is address how you think and feel about money, and gives a holistic approach to your finances.

Much of the book is spent examining specific attitudes that can make or break you financially. For example, Eker shows how people who are financially successful tend to look at problems from a solution-oriented viewpoint, instead of getting bogged down in the problems themselves. He strongly advocates avoiding the victim mentality that often leads people to do nothing but complain about their situation rather than apply more creative thinking--the biggest offenders are blame (someone else), justifying (why you are where you are, and still not doing anything about it) and complaining (again, instead of doing something about it). Much of the book serves to undo these three components of the victim complex in relation to finances. Additionally, he goes to great length to demonstrate how the attitudes we were raised with affect how we view money--if we're raised with parents who act as if money is evil, then our attitudes are likely to be the same.

The author clearly uses neurolinguistic programming as a tool for undoing these harmful attitudes.
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