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Security Analysis: The Classic 1951 Edition Hardcover – December 31, 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 770 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 3 edition (December 31, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071448209
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071448208
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 2.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #94,172 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The Book that Launched Value Investing, with Guidance and Insights that Stand the Test of Time

Security Analysis: The Classic 1951 Edition provides a rare glimpse into the fundamental building blocks of modern value investing, with insights and strategies for the modern individual investor that are as valuable today as they were more than half a century ago. It brings Benjamin Graham's proven methods for measuring asset values and cash flows, still the centerpiece of value investing worldwide, to today's investment professionals.

Focused on common stocks as a sound investment alternative for individual investors, this classic volume features:

  • Expanded material on stockholder-management relations--vitally important in today's era of improved corporate governance and stockholder empowerment
  • A step-by-step process for understanding income and balance sheets, and their direct relationship to future stock price appreciation
  • Historically proven guidelines for recognizing, and capitalizing on, profitable opportunities in secondary, little-known issues

In the search for stocks poised to beat the market, basic techiques and strategies still work the best. Security Analysis: The Classic 1951 Edition shows you how to look beyond market noise and confusion to find undervalued stocks, and assemble a diversified portfolio that will provide you with outstanding profits today and in the years to come.

About the Author

Benjamin Graham is widely acknowledged to be the father of modern security analysis. The founder of the value school of investing and founder and former president of the Graham-Newman corporation investment fund, he taught at Columbia University's Graduate School of Business from 1928 through 1957. Graham popularized the examination of price-to-earnings (P/E) ratios, debt-to-equity ratios, divident records, book values, and earnings growth, and he also wrote the popular investors' guide The Intelligent Investor.

David Dodd was a colleague of Benjamin Graham's at Columbia University, where he was an assistant professor of finance.


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Customer Reviews

It must be read as a text book.
NMM
If Warren Buffett learned from Benjamin Graham, we should all find something valuable in this book.
Mariusz Skonieczny
This is a classic and one of the best books on investing ever.
Vince Berry

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

122 of 123 people found the following review helpful By Befragt VINE VOICE on June 14, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have read this book twice now - one time is certainly not sufficient to absorb all of its wisdom - ten times probably would not suffice. There are some people who question whether this book is still relevant because it was published over half a century ago. I doubt they ever took the time to read it, or if they read it, I doubt that they really thought about it.

The book's central point is that an investment should be made based upon a thorough investigation of the investment's merits - not on the market generally, or interest rates, etc. It does not promise an easy path to riches - the techniques take work. However, Graham and Dodd's theory of focusing on safety of principal plus satisfactory return has been time-tested, and no one can question the success that Graham's disciples such as Warren Buffett have enjoyed.

A few interesting points: the book is not limited to equity investments. As Security Analysis highlights, equity investments and debt investments are similar insofar as both lay claim to the underlying assets of a company (they are different in the priority they have if the company does not make money).

The book also contains an excellent section on analyzing financial statements. Many of the accounting concerns that this book raised in 1951 occured during the Internet bubble (such as the effect of stock options on a company's value and the use of write-offs to manage earnings). So much for the book being dated!

Even though the book does spend some time analyzing utilities and railroads, the underlying approach used there does have some relevance to other companies.
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Format: Hardcover
What a great book! It was long, long-winded at times, and full of small print and not too much white on the pages, but full of content on the subject at hand: security analysis. I just finished reading the 3rd edition (2004). The original edition was published over 50 years ago and for the most part it is just as applicable today as it was way back in 1951.

The intended audience for this book is obviously people who do security analysis for a living. They might be people working on Wall Street, analyst firms, investment firms, hedge funds, mutual funds, or merger/acquisition departments. But I don't fit into any of those categories.

I'm a SCORE volunteer counselor who coaches small business owners and wanta-be entrepreneurs on starting and improving businesses. The principles included in this book are things my clients need to understand and be adept at using. Could the book have been titled Financial Analysis instead? Maybe. I was most interested in reading the following sections:

>>Analysis of Financial Statements
>>The Valuation of Common Stock
>>Stockholders and Management
>>Security Analysis in Action

I highly recommend this book for anyone who is interested in better understanding how to evaluate companies and what they are really worth so they can be made better and sold for more. It is not light reading, and if you are used to zipping through a book in a few hours like I am, then skip this one.

I didn't see any discussion on cash flow as something to consider when evaluating a company for financial soundness. And I think it should have been included. Also, I didn't really like having to read about railroad and public utility companies. Clearly there could have been some more interesting companies to talk about when making points. All in all, there's lots of wisdom presented in this huge tome and it's invaluable. 5 stars!
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23 of 29 people found the following review helpful By magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on March 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book is rightly considered the true bible of stock analysis, and is famous also for being how Warren Buffet approaches investing, as Graham was Buffet's own teacher.

The book has extensive chapters dealing with every topic useful to the subject of stocks, from reading financial statements (one of the things that almost all amateurs could probably be better at, including myself), to assessing the company's true value, breakup value, etc. As one writer here already said, this is no easy path to riches, since this is a true discipline that takes a lot of work, but it can be done.

However, late in his life, Graham was interviewed and said that his views had changed, and made a very important statement at the time. He said that for many decades, exhaustive methods of stock analysis had been profitable, but that was no longer the case. One must remember that the goal of his method is often not so much for determining the true value of a stock to be bought as an investment, so much as whether it should be liquidated, and the parts sold off, which are worth more individually than the company itself.

In other words, the parts are worth more than the whole, and his method was a profitable way to assess likely candidates for this process. If I remember right, Graham himself was involved at least once in regard to a certain company as an activist investor who successfully pressured management to accept a buy-out or liquidate the company.

In fact, at the time of the interview, Graham said that "He was no longer a proponent of detailed methods of stock analysis." He said that there had been a time when that was quite profitable, but that times had changed, and he now favored a cash-flow oriented approach.
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