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Seeker (Alex Benedict) Hardcover – November 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Series: Alex Benedict (Book 3)
  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Ace Hardcover (November 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0441013295
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441013296
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #274,488 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Ideas abound in McDevitt's classy riff on the familiar lost-space-colony theme. In 2688, interstellar transports Seeker and Bremerhaven left a theocratic Orwellian Earth to found a dictator-free society, Margolia—and vanished. Nine thousand years later, with a flawed humanity spread over 100-odd worlds, Margolia and its ships have become Atlantis-type myths, but after a cup from Seeker falls into the hands of antiquarian Alex Benedict, the hero of McDevitt's Polaris (2004), Alex determines to win everlasting fame and vaster fortune by finding them. Female pilot Chase Kolpath, this book's narrator, gutsily tracks the ancient Seeker on a breathless trek across star systems and through an intriguing mystery plot, a bevy of fully realized characters, ingenious AI ships and avatars of long-departed personalities who offer advice and entertainment. The scientific interpolations are as convincing as the far-future planetscapes and human and alien societies, bolstering an irresistible tractor beam of heavy-duty action. This novel delivers everything it promises—with a galactic wallop.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

McDevitt's latest gripping novel of future history begins in the late twentieth century, when a technological breakthrough costs the lives of its discoverers. Then it jumps seven centuries forward, to the beginning of interstellar flight and some of the first refugees from Earth. Finally, it moves into the very far future and to the seeker of the title, one of several looking for inhabited worlds that are the results, however longterm, of events recorded earlier. McDevitt is now being compared, quite legitimately, to Arthur C. Clarke, and not only because he has a similar kind of grand vision of the human future among the stars. He also has characters with amiable, or not-so-amiable, quirks, who in the middle of deciphering the secrets of lost races take time to worry about where to get a good meal in the next town. One of these days McDevitt is going to receive an actual and well-deserved big award to go with his professional stature. Roland Green
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

I highly recommend this book to all Sci-Fi fans!!
jmax479
It is extremely slow, as others noted as well, and there are just too many conversations that go absolutely nowhere and seem to serve only as filler.
Dawn Marie Martin-Ali
Characters are well developed and the story flows smoothly.
Dan S

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

84 of 91 people found the following review helpful By Christopher K. Koenigsberg VINE VOICE on February 23, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book. It satisfies various "itches" that I try to "scratch", by reading good mature science fiction.

One thing I appreciate about his writing in this novel (and its predecessor) is his use sometimes of fairly realistic first-person narrative, by a woman character. Male authors often don't get their female characters quite right (my wife made me especially aware of this).

McDevitt has carved out a sort of unique niche for himself, with this and some (not all) of his other novels, perhaps you might call it "future archaeology"?

For the most satisfying experience, before reading this novel you should read the two earlier, equally good novels, that take place in the same world, with the same main characters (Alex Benedict and Chase Kolpath): "A Talent For War" (don't be put off by the awful title) and "Polaris".

And for "A Talent For War", you can get it by itself, or you can also get it in a book called "Hello Out There", that combines it with a rewritten earlier novel of his ("The Hercules Text").

McDevitt's other, equally good series, of "future archaeology" novels, features a different world and different main character (Priscilla "Hutch" Hutchinson". That series starts with "The Engines of God" and continues through "DeepSix", "Chindi", and "Omega".
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25 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Book Reviewer 2009 on September 7, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
(***** = breathtaking, **** = excellent, *** = good, ** = flawed, * = bad)

McDevitt is more of an idea-guy than a writer: his characters are flat and his descriptions employ so little sensory information that he manages to make scenes like an apartment break-in by a vengeful man and a fight for survival outside of a spaceship seem boring.

BUT -- his ideas such as a journey among a telepathic alien species among whom lying is unknown, and (especially) what happened to the lost colonists of the Bremerhaven and the Seeker) are absolutely breathtaking.

Reading Seeker was sometimes a slog, but I was entertained and glad I'd read it in the end. Longer review at ImpatientReader-dot-com.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Cypherpunk on September 23, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Let me say right off the bat that I really like Jack McDevitt and both of his series: "Hutch" Hutchins and the Chase Kolpath and Alex Benedict duo (in this series). I have tremendously enjoyed most of his other books (I wasn't wild about Ancient Shores, which doesn't belong to either of these series). Others describe the story well, so I won't go into that. McDevitt is up to his usual standard, which is pretty darn good.

My main complaint with this story is that it is very, very similar to a couple of his other books, including scenes that involve an uncomfortable meeting with the only known alien race, realistic but prolonged research phases of the story, scenes that involve narrow escapes from attempts on the main characters' lives, and a similar denger/trap when the last site or artifact is found. Also, I appreciate the fact that McDevitt's stories are built on human characters, and he never goes for the 'deus ex machina' conclusion, but rather his stories are driven by very human characters that read like people you know, or would like to know. However, this time around, McDevitt's far future feels a little TOO much like today, and I felt that way in this book more than many of his others, even though he actually offers an explanation for that similarity (there is an upper limit on the intelligence level that allows people to function well in society, once exceeded by too many members, the society begins to disintegrate).

I read a lot, and I often go several years before returning to an author and getting several of his/her books and reading them consecutively. I read more than half this book before I finally decided that I hadn't read it a couple of years ago. It was that similar to his other books.

I like the characters and the universe he's created, but I really felt that I hadn't read anything new when I finished this book.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By W Boudville HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 3, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is another story set in the universe of "A Talent For War", some years after Alex Benedict and Chase Kolpath made their discovery about Christopher Sim. It follows the earlier "Polaris".

This story gives us more background on how humans left Earth in the 3rd and 4th millenia. Here, for instance, we find that English was no longer spoken after the 3rd millenium. And that the colonisation of nearby star systems took centuries. With early efforts marked by failure. It also places the stories some six thousand years in the future. Whereas the earlier books were somewhat unclear about when they were set, relative to our time.

The plot follows McDevitt's usual quiet pace. Too quite for some readers. But he has attracted a decent readership with his other books, who will not be disappointed here. The ideas here are fairly ingenious. He has put some thought into the scenario of a lost colony. Of how it got lost and how it survived.

Perhaps a disappointment, and which is constant in this series, is how few advances in longevity have occurred. No diseases are mentioned to afflict people. But the average life span is discernibly little improved over ours. People are considered middle aged at 60 and elderly at 90.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo on February 11, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Seeker (full name Seeker after Truth) has dreamed, his whole life, of becoming a Nomana, a Noble Warrior. A protector of the All and Only, the god who made all things. The desire to be one has only grown stronger since his brother, Blaze of Justice, became a Noble Warrior. Seeker knows that this is his destiny, never mind that his father expects him to become Teacher. Now he is sixteen, old enough to go before the Nom and offer himself, and hope that they accept him.

Morning Star is the daughter of a sheep herder. Years ago her mother left them to become a Noble Warrior. Now, on her sixteenth birthday, Morning Star intends to leave the hills she's always known, and join her mother in service to the All and Only. Her only worry is leaving her father; she is his world. She's not too worried about being denied by the Nomana; after all her mother is a Noble Warrior. If that's not enough, there are the colors. The colors surround all people, and change a little based on someone's mood and intentions, but everyone has colors around them. Morning Star can see them, and has learned to read them. She will journey to Anacrea to find her destiny.

Wildman has never known his family. He's never even really known friendship, or loyalty, or honor. He certainly doesn't know about the All and Only. All he's ever known is survival at any cost. In the midst of an attempted robbery, Wildman encounters a Nomana, though he doesn't know what that is. What he knows is that he's glimpsed a power far stronger than his own, and a peace he never imagined. Wildman wants these things, and what Wildman wants, Wildman always gets. He too will offer his services to the Nom, though he doesn't really think of it in those exact terms.
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