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Seize the Day (Penguin Classics) Paperback – May 27, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Penguin Classics
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Reissue edition (May 27, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142437611
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142437612
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.4 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (87 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #52,400 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

''It is the special distinction of Mr. Bellow as a novelist that he is able to give us, step by step, the world we really live each day--and in the same movement to show us that the real suffering of not understanding, the deprivation of light. It is this double gift that explains the unusual contribution he is making to our fiction.'' --New York Times

''One of the finest short novels in the language.'' --Guardian

''Saul Bellow is one of the giants of the twentieth-century novel. Read Seize the Day and see why.'' --Irish Times --This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.

About the Author

SAUL BELLOW (1915-2005), author of numerous novels, novellas, and stories, was the only novelist to receive three National Book Awards. He also received the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize in Literature, and the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. During the 1967 Arab-Israeli conflict, he served as a war correspondent for Newsday. He taught at New York University, Princeton, and the University of Minnesota and served as chairman of the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. --This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.

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Customer Reviews

I've read the book many times and laughed and cried through all of them.
Sverre Haanes
His deepest wish is for a measure of genuine love and respect, amid the ruins of a life that has never been fully lived.
Robert Oliver
It is a richly ironic work with brilliant portraits of minor characters.
Shalom Freedman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

103 of 111 people found the following review helpful By Lesley Freitas on June 23, 2005
Format: Paperback
I picked up "Seize The Day" when, one afternoon, I realized I'd never read anything by Saul Bellow. Throughout high school and college, none of his books had ever been assigned to me, and though I knew his name, it never resonated with me the way the names Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, or Steinbeck had. After reading "Seize the Day," I am rather angry at my high school teachers and college professors--and myself!--for keeping me from this author for so long.

"Seize The Day" tells the story of one day in the life of Tommy Wilhelm, a middle-aged failed actor who now lives in the same New York hotel as his father. Tommy is separated from his wife, and rarely sees his children; furthermore, he has been unemployed for several months, and faces losing the last of his money in an ill-conceived stock market venture. It is with all of this in mind that Tommy finally comes to a day of realization and reckoning, when he realizes his isolation and his failure.

The theme of man's isolation is strong throughout the book, yet it is not what struck me most about Tommy's situation. I read "Seize The Day" immediately after finishing "The Fountainhead," and perhaps that skewed my focus a bit. What I found most interesting about Tommy is his inability to judge himself. He is aware of his failures, but cannot take the final step and truly confront them; he must ask those around him, particularly his father, both for a kind word and for a way to understand himself. I have to wonder if Tommy's isolation would be less of a burden if he weren't also isolated from himself--a thought which struck me to the core.

If you are like me, and have read dozens of American classics without touching a Saul Bellow book, read "Seize The Day" as soon as possible.
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59 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Littrell HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 23, 2005
Format: Paperback
"Seize the day, put no trust in the morrow" is what Horace wrote at the end of his first book of Odes a couple of thousand years ago. And ever since, youth has been urged to make hay while the sun shines since the bird of time is on the wing--to toss in a couple more homilies. But what Saul Bellow has in mind here is entirely ironic since his sad protagonist, Tommy Wilhelm Adler has never seized the day at all, much to his unfeeling father's disgust.

This then is a tale of failure (one of Bellow's recurring themes) and the shame and self-loathing that failure may bring; and yet there is a sense, or at least a hint--not of redemption of course--but of acceptance and understanding at the end of this short existential novel by the Nobel Prize winner.

The way that Bellow's drowning, existential man experiences the funeral as this novel ends is the way we should all experience a funeral, that is, with the certain knowledge that the man lying dead in the coffin is, or will be, us.

And we should cry copious tears and a great shudder should seize us and we should sob as before God with the full realization that our day too will come, and sooner than we think--which is what big, blond-haired, handsome Jewish "Wilkie" Adler does. And in that realization we know that he has seen the truth and we along with him. An existential truth of course.

The structure of the novel, like James Joyce's Ulysses, begins and ends in the same day. Through flashbacks from Adler's nagging consciousness, the failures and disappointments of his life are recalled.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful By immortal pickwick on November 21, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a powerful page-turner which in my view should be read once through to fully experience its sweeping crescendo and then again at a more deliberate pace to appreciate the beatifully descriptive langauge and symbolism of the text. Bellow writes with a detached sympathy for his unfortunate hero, Tommy Wilhelm, who finds himself on the brink of financial ruin and spiritual collapse. I think this is an important story about alienation in our modern commercial society and renewal through acquaintance with the true bared self within us that we are taught to neglect and long to return to. In just over a hundred pages, Saul Bellow manages to bring the ominously swelling pressures of his tragic hero's surroundings and inner monologue to a swirling climax, compassionately cleansing Tommy in an emotional acceptance of himself in the turbulent end. All the while, Bellow meticulously develops a suffocating world in which with Tommy we can't help but feel the merciless chaos surrounding him and amidst it all sympathize with the poignant alienation of a reflective mind. Very interesting read and highly recommended as a primer to Bellow's oeuvre.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 5, 1998
Format: Paperback
Tommy Wilhelm might be construed as an echo of Willy Loman, Arthur Miller's delusional salesman in "Death of a Salesman." Yet he stands powerfully and foolishly on his own as a man caught between the culture of his fathers and a trashy American movie culture that hints of crime, triviality, and indifference. In the rendering of this time and place that Wilhelm can never quite find his niche in, the book rings true even today, four decades after its publication. Tommy's presence in the novel is both physical (I could sense his high blood pressure in his conversations with his father and with the con-man Dr. Tamkin) and spiritual. His attempt to redeem his own failed past in a single day, and the lies he tells himself to get through the "con," are pathetic, believable, and the stuff of a moral tale I recommend highly. The book reads pleasurably and fast the first time, yet it rewards second and third readings.
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