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Selected Poems Paperback – July 3, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial Modern Classics (July 3, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060882964
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060882969
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #119,184 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000) is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Annie Allen and one of the most celebrated African American poets. She was Poet Laureate for the state of Illinois, a National Women's Hall of Fame inductee, and a recipient of a lifetime achievement award from the National Endowment for the Arts. She received fifty honorary degrees. Her other books include A Street in Bronzeville, In the Mecca, The Bean Eaters, and Maud Martha.

Customer Reviews

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I fully recommend "Selected Poems" by Gwendolyn Brooks.
A.Trendl HungarianBookstore.com
It was an amazing period in African-American cultural history, and an amazing period for African-American poets and poems.
Glynn Young
It is a pleasure to have read a book and been inspired by a true master.
Mr. K. Sonola

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Glynn Young VINE VOICE on February 18, 2014
Format: Paperback
Everything changed in the 1960s, but the seeds of change were planted long before. One of those seeds was the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, an explosion of African-American culture centered in New York and embracing literature, music, theater, painting, and more. Associated with the renaissance were names like Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, W.E. B. Du Bois, and Langston Hughes. It was an amazing period in African-American cultural history, and an amazing period for African-American poets and poems. One of the beneficiaries of the period was poet Gwendolyn Brooks.

Almost 40 years after the renaissance, Brooks (1917-2000) wrote this poem about Langston Hughes:

Langston Hughes (1963)

is merry glory.
Is salutatory.
Yet grips his right of twisting free.

Has a long reach,
Strong speech,
Remedial fears.
Muscular tears.

Holds horticulture
In the eye of the vulture
Inform profession.
In the compression—
In mud and blood and sudden death—
In the breath
Of the holocaust he
Is helmsman, hatchet, headlight.
See
One restless in the exotic time! and ever,
Till the air is cured of its fever.

Born in Topeka, Kansas, Brooks spent virtually her entire life in Chicago. Her parents, a janitor and a schoolteacher, enouraged her desire for reading and writing. She published her first poem at 13, and her first poetry collection at 28. She won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1950; she was 33 and the first African-American to win any Pulitzer Prize. Later she became the first African-American woman to become consultant to the Library of Congress (which we now call Poet Laureate).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Fitton on September 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is fine anthology. Unfortunately it doesn't include her later work. But the poetry is so compelling that I purchased another anthology that does have later work.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. K. Sonola on July 30, 2014
Format: Paperback
It is a pleasure to have read a book and been inspired by a true master.
Gwendolyn Brooks delivers a collection of outstanding poetry of the deepest level that had even this humble poet amazed, confused, bedazzled, in search of a dictionary and overall enamoured by the breadth of magnificent words and stories that are shared by the remarkable writer.
The future of poetry feels more secure when I happily muse about the masses of writers that Gwendolyn Brooks has inspired and still will inspire.
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Format: Paperback
Various editions of "Selected Poems" by the late Gwendolyn Brooks are floating around, most of which only have differences in layout or binding. All have the core poems that defined Brooks as one of America's poets with a social conscience.

In the spirit of Carl Sandburg and Langston Hughes, and occasionally, Robert Frost, her poetry meets the reader head-on. However, to Brooks' credit, and what makes her a great poet, is she sees the big picture, just her greatly skilled colleagues listed above.

Brooks was black. She neither hid it, nor would be ashamed that I said so. Many of her poems revolved around the issues impacting African Americans, both the responsibility they have, as well as an acknowledgment of the difficulties they endure because of racism and cultural differences.

Her poems will survive (and are worth reading today) because they were not shackled to the political milieu of the day. What she wrote in the 1940s, when racism was bolder and more detrimental than today, matters.

She was current, yet eternal. Even though "The Last Quatrain of the Ballad of Emmett Till" refers to a young man murdered decades ago, the reader without that context will still appreciate its common-spoken depth (her indents are diminished in my copy below because of the software to post this):

after the murder,
after the burial

Emmett's mother is a pretty-faced thing;
the tint of pulled taffy.
She sits in a red room,
drinking black coffee.
She kisses her killed boy.
And she is sorry.
Chaos in windy grays
through a red prairie.
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