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Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life (Philosophy of Mind) Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-0195096965 ISBN-10: 0195096967 Edition: 1ST

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Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life (Philosophy of Mind) + The Problem Of The Soul: Two Visions Of Mind And How To Reconcile Them
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Product Details

  • Series: Philosophy of Mind
  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA; 1ST edition (January 25, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195096967
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195096965
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,014,538 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"Marked by many sparkling insights."--The Modern Schoolman


"Owen Flanagan is as wise in matters of the Heart and Spirit as he is distinguished in matters of modern science and philosophical theory. These extraordinary essays set a new standard in the exploration of timeless human concerns--the nature and nurture of the self, the grounds of self worth and collective meaning--partly because Flanagan addresses them as they are illuminated by the nascent sciences of the mind-brain. This volume is a doorway into the moral reasoning of the 21st century. Most importantly, it brings hope, not despair. Enter, and join the new dialogue."--Paul M. Churchland, Professor of Philosophy, University of California, San Diego


"If God is Dead, what are we (our Selves) to do? In the Fear-and-Trembling tradition of Soren Kierkegaard, Owen Flanagan boldly expresses his Self!"--J. Allan Hobson, Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School


"Any person who has a naturalistic view of human beings must face the fundamental question of how morality and meaning are possible in human life. Flanagan artfully weaves together work from the cognitive sciences, recent philosophical accounts of persons and value, and his own deep insights into what it means to live a human life. He constructs a scientifically and psychologically realistic account of personal identity that makes sense of human morality and the human quest for a life that has meaning and purpose."--Mark Johnson, Professor of Philosophy, University of Oregon


About the Author

Owen Flanagan is at Duke University.

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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Currie-Knight TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 17, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Flanagan is in the avant garde of a slowly growing branch in philosophy; those that use philosophy of mind to foray and forage into ethical theory. To me, the discilpine makes all too much sense. After all we have to have figured out (to some degree) who we are and how our selves are 'ourselves' before we can make many informed decisions on how we live.
The book remains very true to its subtitle. The first essays are very much on the mind (from a neurological and phychological standpoint. Warning: these essays repeat much of what Flanagan has written in "Consiousness Reconsidered" and subsequently in "Dreaming Souls". Of note are the essays "Is a science of the conscious mind possible" where Flanagan champions his brand of holism: taking the data from philosophy, psychology, neurology, evolutionary biology and possibly even religion. The mistake most pessimists make, Flanagan argues, is they ignore or discount the 'soft' sciences like psychology and philosophy and focus on the 'hard' ones. The problem is the 'hard' can answer the what quetions, but the 'soft' are the only ones that could possibly answer the 'why' and 'how'. Also of note is an essay on multiple personality disorder and how it is possible to have more than one self. Suprisingly, Flanagan suggests that we all, in a sense, have multiple selves - we are just better at integrating them so they are more like 'sub-selves'.
The next bit focuses on morality. Of note here is an essay called "I remember you" about the risky businesss of recovering memory. Flanagan, unsuprisingly, shows that it is rare that a memory will recall how the event actually was, but, that usually they embelish themselves a little.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Currie-Knight TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 17, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Flanagan is in the avant garde of a slowly growing branch in philosophy; those that use philosophy of mind to foray and forage into ethical theory. To me, the discilpine makes all too much sense. After all we have to have figured out (to some degree) who we are and how our selves are 'ourselves' before we can make many informed decisions on how we live.
The book remains very true to its subtitle. The first essays are very much on the mind (from a neurological and phychological standpoint. Warning: these essays repeat much of what Flanagan has written in "Consiousness Reconsidered" and subsequently in "Dreaming Souls". Of note are the essays "Is a science of the conscious mind possible" where Flanagan champions his brand of holism: taking the data from philosophy, psychology, neurology, evolutionary biology and possibly even religion. The mistake most pessimists make, Flanagan argues, is they ignore or discount the 'soft' sciences like psychology and philosophy and focus on the 'hard' ones. The problem is the 'hard' can answer the what quetions, but the 'soft' are the only ones that could possibly answer the 'why' and 'how'. Also of note is an essay on multiple personality disorder and how it is possible to have more than one self. Suprisingly, Flanagan suggests that we all, in a sense, have multiple selves - we are just better at integrating them so they are more like 'sub-selves'.
The next bit focuses on morality. Of note here is an essay called "I remember you" about the risky businesss of recovering memory. Flanagan, unsuprisingly, shows that it is rare that a memory will recall how the event actually was, but, that usually they embelish themselves a little.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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