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Self Help Serenade Import


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Audio CD, Import, May 18, 2004
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 18, 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Label
  • ASIN: B00022GJWY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,732,091 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Don't Believe
2. Halfway House
3. Empty Room
4. Stare
5. How Can You Laugh
6. Waves
7. Please Don't
8. Cracks in the Wall
9. Stand in the World
10. Hold on to You
11. Silver Gun
12. My Sun Is Setting Over Her Magic

Editorial Reviews

Hailing from Los Angeles the four piece, have created an album that is as rich as it is beautiful, packed full of slow burning melodies & soul-inspiring songs. Tapping into the same vein as Mercury Rev, Grandaddy, Coldplay & Doves whilst drawing inspiration from Neil Young, John Lennon & Brian Wilson, they present a glorious vision of West Coast pop that deals as much with gentle melancholy as wide-eyed wonder.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
18
4 star
1
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 22 customer reviews
The music and lyrics mesh perfectly together to produce very deep and soulful tracks.
M. Mckean
Clearly the lyrics are very introspective, and are socially relevant without being obnoxiously preachy.
Andrew V. Napoli
Marjorie Fair truly has set itself apart from any of the music being promoted by the record companies.
Ralph De Lisa

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 19, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If Mercury Rev had a more intimate sound, and had a more melodious lead singer, they might sound something like Marjorie Fair. And this is only their debut. One can only imagine how beautiful their music will be in ten years' time.

The Los Angeles quartet creates a dazzling first impression in "Self Help Serenade," a polished indie pop album that combines slow, eerie melodies with panoramic sound. Like a strange dream full of stars and rainy spring forests, this album sticks to your mind even when you wake up... I mean, when it's over. Why did this languish in limbo for three years?

Faint sound effects and a guitar melody kick off "Don't Believe," a dreamy pop song that starts the album off on a dark note. "Don't believe a word they say/they're only there to take you away... don't believe a word they say/they're only trying to scare you away..." Evan Slamka sings in the opener, sounding like a cynical, sad young boy.

Things don't get much more cheerful as the album goes on, using the same kind of epic pop sound that Mercury Rev and the Doves made famous. But in addition to that, Marjorie Fair dips into catchier art-pop, murky ballads, and acoustic laments that are colored by ghostly keyboard.

The songwriting is even more tragic, with Slamka singing, "They found her in a plastic veil/with blood stained boots and glass in her hair." But it ends on a startlingly mellow note, with Slamka resigning himself to his girlfriend leaving. He sounds peaceful as he sings, "My sun is setting over her magic/equal parts caring and tragic/I'll be burning for awhile..."

Marjorie Fair is not just a talented bands.
Read more ›
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 15, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If Mercury Rev had a more intimate sound, and had a more melodious lead singer, they might sound something like Marjorie Fair. And this is only their debut. One can only imagine how beautiful their music will be in ten years' time.

The Los Angeles quartet creates a dazzling first impression in "Self Help Serenade," a polished indie pop album that combines slow, eerie melodies with panoramic sound. Like a strange dream full of stars and rainy spring forests, this album sticks to your mind even when you wake up... I mean, when it's over. Why did this languish in limbo for three years?

Faint sound effects and a guitar melody kick off "Don't Believe," a dreamy pop song that starts the album off on a dark note. "Don't believe a word they say/they're only there to take you away... don't believe a word they say/they're only trying to scare you away..." Evan Slamka sings in the opener, sounding like a cynical, sad young boy.

Things don't get much more cheerful as the album goes on, using the same kind of epic pop sound that Mercury Rev and the Doves made famous. But in addition to that, Marjorie Fair dips into catchier art-pop, murky ballads, and acoustic laments that are colored by ghostly keyboard.

The songwriting is even more tragic, with Slamka singing, "They found her in a plastic veil/with blood stained boots and glass in her hair." But it ends on a startlingly mellow note, with Slamka resigning himself to his girlfriend leaving. He sounds peaceful as he sings, "My sun is setting over her magic/equal parts caring and tragic/I'll be burning for awhile..."

Marjorie Fair is not just a talented bands.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Andrew V. Napoli on July 25, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This album sort of grew on me as I listened to it in my car. The strongest songs in my opinion are "Stare," "Waves," and "Empty Room," but the other songs are pretty good too. Clearly the lyrics are very introspective, and are socially relevant without being obnoxiously preachy. There's a sort of sadness and ennui that comes through most of the songs lyrically, but also an element of upbeat and sunny disposition where the musical influences of the Beatles and the Beach Boys poke through the music. This combination of happiness and sadness in the same song, at the same time, is pretty unique, and is certainly a credit to the lead singer/songwriter, Evan Slamka.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 2, 2005
Format: Audio CD
If Mercury Rev had a more intimate sound, and had a more melodious lead singer, they might sound something like Marjorie Fair. And this is only their debut. One can only imagine how beautiful their music will be in ten years' time.

The Los Angeles quartet creates a dazzling first impression in "Self Help Serenade," a polished indie pop album that combines slow, eerie melodies with panoramic sound. Like a strange dream full of stars and rainy spring forests, this album sticks to your mind even when you wake up... I mean, when it's over. Why did this languish in limbo for three years?

Faint sound effects and a guitar melody kick off "Don't Believe," a dreamy pop song that starts the album off on a dark note. "Don't believe a word they say/they're only there to take you away... don't believe a word they say/they're only trying to scare you away..." Evan Slamka sings in the opener, sounding like a cynical, sad young boy.

Things don't get much more cheerful as the album goes on, using the same kind of epic pop sound that Mercury Rev and the Doves made famous. But in addition to that, Marjorie Fair dips into catchier art-pop, murky ballads, and acoustic laments that are colored by ghostly keyboard.

The songwriting is even more tragic, with Slamka singing, "They found her in a plastic veil/with blood stained boots and glass in her hair." But it ends on a startlingly mellow note, with Slamka resigning himself to his girlfriend leaving. He sounds peaceful as he sings, "My sun is setting over her magic/equal parts caring and tragic/I'll be burning for awhile..."

Marjorie Fair is not just a talented bands.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


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