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Seneca, Volume IV, Epistles 1-65 (Loeb Classical Library No. 75) Hardcover – January 31, 1917

ISBN-13: 978-0674990845 ISBN-10: 0674990846

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (January 31, 1917)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674990846
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674990845
  • Product Dimensions: 4 x 1 x 6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #138,256 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Donald Vish on December 10, 2003
Seneca's one hundred and twenty four letters to Lucilius constitute a secular bible, an ethical catechism written in a gnomic and epigrammatic style that sparkles as it enlightens. So impressed were the early church fathers with Seneca's moral insights that they advanced (fabricated?) the speculation that he must have come within the influence of Christian teachings. T.S. Eliot sneers at Seneca's boyish, commonplace wisdom and points out that the resemblances between Seneca's 'stoic philosophy' and Christianity are superficial. For those seeking a practical, modern manual on how to do good and how to do well, written in the 'silver point' style that values brevity, concision and memorable expression, Seneca's letters are indeed the Good Book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By R. Harrison on November 15, 2006
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In this series of letters to a friend, Seneca discusses his philosophy of life, which seems quite realistic and uplifting to me (your mileage may vary). He often quotes Epicurus, sometimes to agree with him, sometimes to disparage him. In addition to the philosophy there are also many glimpses of everyday life and occasional bits of wry humor. The English translation flows well and reveals the depth and wit of the original text.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By neil berkowitz on April 7, 2013
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Such wisdom, common sense, and an approach to Life and Death which is reassuring.
Although written more than 2000 years ago, much of this book is as pertinent now as it was then.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By mr. d. on January 24, 2014
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Evaluating the morality of this kind of philosophy may be left to the eye of the reader.
For those studying Latin: Seneca's language challenges more on the specific meanings of terms and less with the framework of difficult syntax, meaning, you'll work less with your grammar and more in your dictionary.
The translation, far off and polished up, does not suit for control-checks of the source text.
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Frequently Bought Together

Seneca, Volume IV, Epistles 1-65 (Loeb Classical Library No. 75) + Seneca: Epistles 66-92 (Loeb No. 76) + Seneca, VI, Epistles 93-124 (Loeb Classical Library)
Price for all three: $73.00

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