Sense and Sensibility 1 Season 1981

Amazon Instant Video

Season 1
(62) IMDb 6.8/10

5. Sense and Sensibility Episode 5 TV-G CC

Marianne's heart is doubly broken by a yet more callous rejection by Willoughby. Elinor is to meet Edward's mother.

Starring:
Irene Richard, Tracey Childs
Runtime:
26 minutes
Original air date:
March 1, 1981

Sense and Sensibility Episode 5

Season 1

Customer Reviews

Color was very good and everything about the dvd was excellent.
frederick palmer
The acting is stiff and dull as if the actors were reading their lines from a far-off teleprompter.
Krysia
Irene Richards and Tracey Childs are well cast as Elinor and Marianne.
D. S. Thurlow

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

68 of 73 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 12, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Having seen the praised American version of this novel I was delighted (especially by Emma Thompson ). Sometimes I had a feeling of too much drama in that film. But I had not read this novel for some years, so I did not know why.
I read the novel again and realized that film was the American way of showing Jane Austen and her time: the men always riding (like cowboys), an education full of freedom even for girls ( Margret and her hut in the tree ...), rain in every turning point or dramatic situation ....
The BBC adaption of this novel tells the story in a more careful, smooth way, true to the novel, few thrilling scenes, but more charming ones. There is time to look at the characters, to feel with them, to see Jane Austen's English humour in some scenes and her feeling for romance. Sometimes I think there are real people on the screen, not heroes. That is one more reason for liking this film as much as the big American movie, or even better. If you want to see Jane Austen brought to life for young people today who need exaggerated feelings to be able to feel and action to find a film worth watching, then switch on the Emma-Thompson-version. If you want to travel back in time and do not want to be rushed into new situations, then watch the BBC production. It is entertaining, touching and teaching in a smooth way. It is holiday for your brain and nerves.
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By James R Whitcomb on June 22, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
despite the unfortunate removal of Margaret this movie is extremely well acted, and develops more the humor of Marianne's sensibilities as oppose to romanticizing them. Which is what Jane Austen wished to develop. Two most important parts of the plot are here, as opposed to Emma Thompson's disappointing removal of the scenes where Edward visits the Dashwoods for a week and where Willoughby attempts to see Marianne in the middle of the night. I loves those parts so very much, and my heart sank upon realizing that wasn't to occurr in the Thompson version.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 8, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
I rented this version from my local library and really enjoyed it. Although I liked the movie with Emma Thompson, this version is much more thorough in its adaptation. No Hollywood fluff. The actors were superb and true to the characters in the book.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Stanley H. Nemeth on April 14, 2008
Format: DVD
Many commentators have duly chastised this 1981 BBC production for being less a film than merely a filmed book, and consequently clumsy in chosen images, while also dull in pacing and rhythm. What works on the written page clearly does not always transfer successfully unless suitable adjustments have been made to the requirements of a different medium. I'd agree that this version of Austen's novel is ultimately one better listened to than watched. At the same time, it has merits lacking in both the Emma Thompson and more recent Andrew Davies versions. Both of these last, for my money, were far too amiable in their vision, so that Jane Austen tends to emerge in them as a gentle-hearted chronicler of Regency order rather than a shrewd, even lethal social satirist.

No less a worthy than E.M.Forster is on record as saying Austen showed him the possibilities of deadly domestic humor. And indeed in "Sense and Sensibility" the bores and mean-spirited types among the country gentry are captured for all time, like insects in amber. This adaptation of the novel is truer than others to Austen's insights here. Dinner parties and card-playing scenes are punctuated by superlatively stupid or just plain snobbish comments from the due recipients of Austen's irony. And Lucy Steele, for instance, emerges not as a potentially sympathetic fiancee of Edward's, but as in the novel a pretty mean inquisitor who adds to Elinor's private sufferings.

The final encounter of Willoughby and Elinor is included here, as in the
Davies version, but the dialogue in this version is truer to the complex moral response of the novel. In Davies, Willoughby remains pretty much just a nasty fellow to a suddenly one-dimensional, priggish Elinor and an unnecessarily appearing Marianne.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jana L. Perskie HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 22, 2005
Format: DVD
Rodney Bennett's 1981 BBC adaptation of "Sense and Sensibility," the glorious romance of mores and manners, set during England's Regency Period, lacks verve, pizzazz, vitality. However, except for the mysterious absence of young Margaret Dashwood, it is quite faithful to Jane Austen's brilliant novel.

Comparisons to Ang Lee's Award-winning film version, with screenplay by Emma Thompson, is inevitable - but is like comparing apples and oranges, although both are based on Ms. Austen's first published novel. And "there is the rub." Bennett's film cannot compare in the polished final production, gorgeous locations and beautiful period costumes department - assets which a small budget cannot bestow upon a movie, especially one made for TV. However, many of the performances here are excellent, especially those of the Dashwood sisters, Willoughby, Edward Ferrars and Lucy Steele.

A Lovely Tracey Childs plays Marianne Dashwood to perfection. Marianne is a passionate young woman, with a definite inclination toward the humanities: art, music and literature. Her heart rules her head, more often than not, and she has a very spontaneous nature. Irene Richard gives a strong performance as Elinor Dashwood, the older of the two sisters. She has a more practical, sensible temperament. While Elinor appreciates the music and literature that her sibling so passionately loves, she definitely thinks things through before making decisions, or taking action, and keeps her personal feelings to herself. She feels tremendous responsibility for her family's well-being. Marianne believes that Elinor, whom she loves, is too cold, and subdued - more concerned with propriety than with feelings. Elinor, on the other hand, is concerned about Marianne's open and guileless behavior.
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