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109 of 112 people found the following review helpful
on October 6, 2012
(there are a lot of video and written reviews for this game already so I'll only cover differences between this edition (the second) and the first printing, and explain a bit why I and my friends like it)

Sentinels of the Multiverse is a co-operative, super hero themed card game. And I love it. The first edition of Sentinels came out last year and was met with positive and enthusiastic reviews, but there were three general criticisms. First, the game did not scale well. Although the game was designed for 2-5 players, the scenarios each game would totter wildly from ridiculously easy to insufferably difficult based on the number of people playing. Second, the first edition had no way for recording the various hit points and card interactions. These included hit points, damage reductions, and card restrictions; this in turn required players to develop their own system whether that be dice, pen and paper, or even an ios app. Third, the game did not store well in the box, again forcing players to come up with their own solutions.

This, however, is not the first edition of Sentinels of the Multiverse. This is the second, Enhanced Edition, and it addresses each of this missteps from the first printing. First, most of this cards were slightly altered to reflect the number of heroes in the game. So for example, a villain in the first edition would do 4 damage every turn, but in the new edition, he now does X damage each turn where X is the number of heroes in play. Now, it doesn't matter if you're playing with 3 heroes or 5, you'll still have a fun, challenging (and not impossible) experience. Second, this Enhanced Edition contains scores of tokens to record hit points, damage multipliers, and other modifiers that affect the heroes and villains. They're simple, clean and make it really easy to know where everyone stands with one glance of the table. Third, this redesigned box not only allows you to store all the cards in the base set, it also has room to store every card from the last two expansions (rook city, infernal relics) and two limited promo decks available from the publisher (Unity hero, Ambuscade villain). As if this wasn't sweet enough, it also includes dividers that help keep the cards organized and they're beautiful to boot.

I'll admit, I read and saw most of the reviews when the first edition was released and thought I would love the game, but the problems with the first printing (mentioned above), were enough to keep me from purchasing it. However, I ordered the enhanced edition as soon as I could and am happy to report that I and my friends are loving it. It's been very quick and easy to teach new players how the game works (about 10 minutes) but has enough complexity that each hero and villain remains interesting for multiple games. And in the last few games, there have been two in particular where we were all hanging on my the skin of our teeth, trying desperately not to be wiped out, only to pull out a last ditch victory. Grand revelry followed.

It's just a great game - get it
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on October 25, 2012
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This is an amazing game to play. It's a cooperative comic book super hero game. Each super hero has their own set deck of cards which they will use to fight against the super villain (of which there are four in this base set). Each hero's deck is very different and has been created in such a way that you feel every strength and weakness of that hero's abilities. Some hero's are just downright scary with how much damage they can pump out if the right combination of cards comes into play. Other heroes are weak on the damage but really shine while they buff (make stronger) other heroes or mess with the villain (like controlling the cards that get played or weakening the damage that the villain can dish out).

Each player picks one hero to play and together the players decide which super villain they will be facing. The villain is played by the game itself (the villain's character card describes how the villain will play its cards on its turn. Like each hero, each villain is very different and offers different challenges. For example, one villain pumps out robotic minions that attack the heroes or even heal the villain. The heroes have to try to destroy these minions and take down the super villain. Another villain uses high tech gadgets and inventions to do direct damage to the heroes and even destroy their gear or ongoing powers (this can really put the hurt on the heroes) while trying to use his greatest invention to pull the moon into the earth. The heroes have a limited amount of time to stop this from happening or it's game over.

On top of this, the players also choose a location deck which represents where they will be fighting the super villain. The base game contains places like a city, a base on mars, the ruins of Atlantis, and even a "lost" island that contains volcanic eruptions and dinosaurs. The location (called the Environment) gets its own turn usually playing the top card from its deck. Things like a T-Rex may show up doing a good amount of damage to a specific character (including the super villain). There are many many different events and effects that the Environments spring on both the heroes and the villain.

Basically, the players win when they bring the villain's hit points down to zero (easier said then done). Even if a player's hero is defeated during the game (hero's hit points reach zero) they are still in the game as they flip their character card over and the hero may choose 1 of 3 different actions that can aid the rest of the players (things like allowing another player to draw a card out of turn....drawing cards is almost always a great thing to do in this game, or healing another hero, and even allowing another hero to make an out of turn attack). So even a downed hero "inspires" the rest of the team to fight on even harder.

This is an amazing co-op game. It is loads of fun, the heroes have been designed amazingly well and are loads of fun to play (some more so than others depending on play style of course). The villains can range from easy to very very hard to beat, though even the easy ones have games where their cards will play really well for them making the usual easy opponent very hard for a game or two.

I can't recommend this game enough. If you like super heroes then you will love this game. However, I've even played with people who don't like super heroes and they even enjoyed the game. It is worth the price as it will provide countless hours of good heroic fun in a well done comic book vein.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on February 6, 2013
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As Co-operative, Superhero Based, card games goes, it's great. Of course, it doesn't have much competition. Actually, it is a great game and I enjoyed it better than the new Marvels Legends game. As a bonus, it is much cheaper and there are already several expansions out and another on the horizon. This is an amazing game with hours and days of fun. Excellent replayability.

Heroes:
I don't really enjoy paying all the various heroes, but so far, someone I know has. Each of the heroes has a different feel and they all play in different ways. One hero you slowly boost yourself up piling on Ongoing effects, another has you collect strange equipment, yet another increases your power the more cards you burn through. There are heroes that are heavy hitters, some hit lightly but spread the damage around. Others just "mess" with the villains without causing the damage. There's even one that wants to take it in the face himself so he can dish it out. So, yes, More than plenty of variety. I can hardly wait to see what the expansion heroes are like.

Villains:
There are four villains you do battle against. The first is a straightforward Robot Factory that sits there and spits out robot minions till you can kill them all and then it. It's simple, but it can swarm for some fun. It gets really wikkid when you have a few bots out and some mega guns on the factory itself. Still, it's straightforward. Others include an evil scientist trying to pull the moon into the earth, if you take too long to defeat him, you'll lose and the world will be destroyed. If you do stop him, he puts on the boots himself and gives you a beat down personally. Fun. Others include an Alien Warlord with a horde of minion soldiers as well as a "Superhero" villain with her own powers and a small group of specialized mini-supervillains that have intricate interplay among themselves. All villains have a great and individual feel, very nice.

Environment:
The third aspect of the game are the environments you fight in. You can battle them on a Mars Base or in a Megacity or perhaps a dinosaur filled lost land. Perhaps you really want a Kraken-filled Lost City of Atlantis. All of the make your struggles even more difficult, but every now and again, they work in your favor. A very nice touch.

Rules:
Simple, Simple, Simple. There are a few things like scaling the game to fit the number of people playing, but not much. It take about five minutes to learn the rules and the rest of the rulebook is filled with awesome comic backstory and funness. However, as simple as the game is, this game includes careful cooperation, timing and strategies. It can be played by anyone able to read the cards, but it'll take a keen mind to truly master it.

Bonuses:
Lastly, the Enhanced Edition includes various counters for hit points and status effects. I love the Hit Point counters, they look like colorful, sturdy cardboard poker chips. They have a great comic feel. I also use the "+1 damage" or "take -1 damage" counters, but the rest seem almost useless to me. I'm sure they can come up, but it's rare and specific and is easier to just remember than to dig through all the remaining counters to find the one you want.

Overall:
I give this game 5 stars. It's well made and fun to play. The cards and counters are sturdy. I don't worry about actually shuffling the cards traditional style and I don't think I'll need the special protective sleeves you can get in various places. I've played in groups of four or just me and my wife. It was fun every time. I'm always looking forward to my next game. Finally, this box is extra big and has room for the expansions when you get them. And if you get this, you will eventually get them. They actually are cheaper than other expansion out there. However, if they come out with a fourth expansion, we'll need a bigger box.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on December 30, 2014
I really expected to like this game. Nearly all the reviews are fantastic and I am a fan of comic books and the super hero genre. However, neither myself nor any of my friends could really get into it. We played through several different bosses from this set plus the expansions, so we definitely gave it a fair attempt.

The biggest issue that my group had with the game is that it requires an extreme amount of micromanagement of damage tokens and bonuses. I cannot confidently say that we ever played a game all the way through without forgetting some damage step or incorrectly calculating the affects of several stacked bonuses/defenses. The beginner level boss decks that did not require as much micromanagement were way too easy. If we were obviously going to win or obviously going to lose, we would usually just quit because it took so much maintenance to keep playing.

I think this game would be really fun if it were played online as an app or video game with AI performing instant calculations. As a tabletop game, every turn got really bogged down with so many calculations and recalculations and "Oh no, we forgot to factor in this card" nearly every round.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on January 8, 2013
Here's the story of how I eventually come to purchase this game. After watching numerous reviews from helpful videos and other websites, I can honestly say that even though most reviews were positive, I had my share of doubts. What initially turned me off was the fear that the game was eventually going to play itself out with little influence and decision making by the players and that the Play 1 Card, Use 1 Power, and Draw 1 card mechanic was too limiting of a factor for the players to enjoy their turns. Boy was I wrong! After finally playing a couple of games with my closest friends and relatives I must say we had a blast! The Decisions that are present in the game are simple (which card you should play, what power you should use, and what targets you are going to hit or help) yet have a ton of meaning to them. For Instance instead of dealing a small amount of damage to the main boss, it might be exponentially more beneficial to the team if I give myself health or reduce the damage of a target on the table, and these types of decisions can ultimately be the demise or fortune of my team. In addition to the decision making, the theme is the backbone of this game and it genuinely feels like a true superhero game in which you and your allies are trying to defeat a supervillain before he/she ends up conquering the Earth with a horde of alien minions, pulling the Moon directly into Earth's orbit, or even enlisting other superhumans to rain havoc and destruction upon the world. Even though the game initially seems easy at first, some of the villains and their followers can be really tricky to defeat and can really threaten the players, which is a plus in any game.

I'm not going to explain how to play this game as you can watch any number of tutorial videos or guides on the internet and even on the publishers main website but I must say that among several playthroughs my only gripe about this game is the amount of bookkeeping that must be done each and every turn. Even with the counters provided in the game, effects and bonuses can still be a pain to manage. For instance, Citizen Dawn's citizen cards tend to add abilities to each other if other specific citizen cards are in play (if Citizen X is in play while Citizen Y is in play, each hero must discard 1 more card [at the end of villain turn]) and that it can be easy to forget bonuses in damage that you may be dealing from the environment or whether or not bonuses in damage apply (like when a villain makes you hit yourself and you forget that your superhero is dealing bonus damage in all their attacks).

Aside from the only negative that I have to mention in this review the game played spectacularly with my friends who enjoyed it and wanted to play some more, even though I had to leave. Everyone playing (including myself) after playing the first game wanted to know more how their hero works, their story, and what kind of abilities the heroes have in their hero decks and what would be good against certain villains over another, which I must say was fun to collaborate over while in the middle of playing the game. My favorite experience in playing this game was my first game when all but my character (The Wraith) was out, with the two other heroes being incapacitated and with Baron Blade in his flipped mode being at 1 health and me being at 2 health, unfortunately Baron Blade had a barrier around him which ended up doing damage to whoever dealt damage to him in each turn, I didn't know or chance if I did the last point of damage to him if it would be a draw or not so I turned to my friends and told them I would just end my turn. What came as a surprise to me that the person on my left who had an incapacitated Visionary could destroy one target with 1 health or lower and we ended up winning the game and defeated Baron Blade! These experiences occur very frequently in this game and can be really satisfying even in defeat because of the thematic and entertaining events that occur during each game.

While being someone who does not appreciate art I must say that some of the artwork in this game is memorable (such as The Wraith's incapacitated side) and some just are not so flattering (There's one of Tachyon's cards that is just a red and orange blur which I don't care too much for) but the style is done in a good comic book fashion and some can be entertaining just to look at, albeit a little inconsistent from other cards. The flavor texts of some of the cards can be memorable and fun to read while illuminating and characterizing the heroes of the game in such a subtle way that is fun to read by referencing quotes from fictional comics that do not exist (yet). I wish there was more to read about the heroes and wish that Greater Than Games publishes comics about this multiverse in the future! From the instance after I played this game I have wanted to know more about the world and just reading all the character bios in the books and website hasn't been enough!

I have only played the game four separate times over the course of this past week and I must say I plan on playing at least on a weekly basis and can certainly say that this game has surprised me in a great way. Each game I have played had brought to light the wonderful strategic and tactical qualities of this game as well as the dynamic situations of working together as a team to help defeat each villain, and on a 10 scale rating I give this game a 8.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 19, 2015
Verified Purchase
I have played a few super hero card games (DC Deck Builder, Marvel Legendary), but Sentinels of the Multiverse is quite a bit different from those. Here's a succinct rundown for how each game plays, since it's something that I would have loved to know before buying Marvel Legendary

1) Sentinels is a fully cooperative game where players take on the role of a super hero, taking his or her unique deck and engaging a villain in a specific environment. Each hero has a unique strategy, with some helping to manipulate other decks, some making constructs to fight for you, some buffing other players, etc.

2) DC Deck Builder is a competitive game where you draft cards out of a public pool. It can be quite cutthroat. It's fun, but definitely doesn't give you the superhero flavor

3) Marvel Legendary is a semi-cooperative game where you shuffle a large deck of different heroes together and do battle with a supervillain and his henchmen. It's fun but challenging, and the setup is rather annoying. I say it's semi-cooperative because IF the players can defeat the supervillain, they get to take score and see which player was able to get the most points.

So long story short, Sentinels of the Multiverse is great. You get to really assume the role of a hero, going so far as to role play if you want!

Time of Setup: Sentinels beats the pants off of Legendary in this regard. Pull out the preconstructed decks, follow the instructions of the villain, and go. This is a fantastic aspect of the game.

Gameplay: The game is very simple. On your turn, you play a card and use a power that is unique to your character. The object is to reduce the supervillain to 0 hit points. Gameplay is where I feel that this starts to require a good group to play with, some people who are really into it. It can get tedious to read each card and deal with the effects of all the villain cards. It's easy to miss things, and there can be a lot of figuring. This gets fiddly, so you need a patient group! I have one friend I really like to play this with, where we each control two heroes and do battle. If I play with my regular group, then one person gets bored and watches his phone, and other people just kind of lose interest as it takes a while for their turn to come up. If you can find people interested in immersing themselves, you'll have a lot of fun.

Support: There are a ton of expansions available for this, and they are all very strong. They add new characters and villains and create a lot of variety to play. The only one I don't care for so much is the one where it adds the team of villains. It's cool and hard, but it's just an awful lot of villain actions to slog through, slowing the game down a lot. But if you have the expansions, you have most of your bases covered. Want to play a Batman-type character? The Wraith is for you. Iron Man? Go with Bunker! Time-travelling Clint Eastwood? The Chrono Ranger. Deadpool? Guise is amazingly hilarious. And so on. The Sentinels mythos is written on the cards, basically, and it is unique, but you can find the analogues of your favorite super heroes in here.

Difficulty: Sentinels suffers similarly to Legendary in terms of difficulty swinging. If you play like me, you randomize everything (using the companion app, which I HIGHLY HIGHLY recommend you get). This can make for a stupidly easy game or an impossible one. More annoyingly, you might come up with a situation like landing on the hero Tempest, whose power is to hit every villain for 1 damage. If you're facing The Dreamer (one of the expansion villains), your job is to protect her and her measly 6 HP at all costs. Of course, you can just say "oh no, Tempest won't work here" and throw him out, but sometimes it won't be obvious that a hero is going to break the game or be dead weight. I felt the same way about Legendary, where you might get a dud hero in the deck or a really, really tough scheme/villain combination. But in Legendary that sucks a lot because you spent 15-20 minutes shuffling all the cards. In Sentinels, you can always just try again with minimal cleanup.

All in all, this game is a very fun experience if you have 1-4 like-minded individuals to play with. You can play it solo, but you'd have to take control of about 4 of them, which I think is not as immersive. Trying to solo this is a quick way to get your butt whooped; it really gets much, much easier with the more players you add to the game, unlike in Legendary. I say you should get Sentinels. Get the expansion packs. Get on with the fun!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2015
Verified Purchase
My husband and I play a lot of board games and this one was recommended to us and looked great. But after playing three times, we are giving it away. Not fun to us. The theme is enticing, but there are way too many little numbers to add and subtract and that becomes the main activity (I'm a math teacher so I'm not afraid of math). We couldn't really get into the strategy or the theme because it was all about managing the adding and subtracting of players points. Like another reviewer said, could be better as a video game with technology keeping track of that stuff.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on July 28, 2014
Verified Purchase
This is an amazing game. After bringing it to a game night at my friends' place, I left it there and when I came back a few days later they said they had played it at least once a day since then. So much thought has gone into creating the fake comic book universe that is the background for the game. There's even flavor text on every card with quotes from made up comics, complete with the issue number. As my friend said, you know a game is good when you're telling stories about it after playing, and that is exactly what happens with this game.
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Recently I had a chance to play the Sentinels of the Multiverse video game on Steam, and if you happened to see my review, you would know that I was a huge fan of the game and its mechanics. Well, that game certainly served a purpose, because it made me absolutely fascinated with what the card game must be like. Having finally had a chance to get my hands on it, I can unequivocally say that while the video game is good, the card game is even better.

At its core, there is really little to no difference between the two mediums. This is a fixed-deck game (meaning that each villain, environment and hero has a set deck of cards they use, unlike a collectible card game like Magic: The Gathering) where two to five players operate cooperatively against a single villain. Each player selects from a variety of heroes and then one of the different enemies and environments is rolled out.

Each player takes a turn, rolling out pieces of equipment, using super powers and playing their cards as they see fit. The villains are more powerful, with more life and stronger cards with objectives that can end a game. If the match carries on too long and too many of your opponent's cards winds up in their discard pile, the game might end because the maniacal scheme of slamming the moon into the earth then succeeds. Add to it the environmental deck, which might add bonuses to damage done or introduce monsters into the fray that attack different people (heroes and villains alike) and the potential for variety here is incredible. At the same time, the potential for expansion is equally obvious due to clever design.

The asymmetrical gameplay is perfect, because the villain and the environment simply play themselves. Their powerful decks do greater blasts of damage, damage to multiple heroes and more. The design is also intelligent because it takes things like the number of heroes playing into consideration. Some of the cards play out dealing damage based on the number of participants. Without this sort of variable flexibility, a five person party would feel incredibly overpowered, but in fact they can be just as likely to succeed or fail as a two superhero team.

The edition also comes with a variety of handy markers. Some are more useful than others. While they come in increments such as 1, 5, 10, 25 for maximum flexibility, some of the villains are just easier to manage using percentage dice like you might in a game of Dungeons & Dragons - especially when one of the villains starts with 100 hit points. That being said, what is provided is completely flexible and just a matter of preference. There are some handy rectangular cardboard icons as well for things like tracking immunity, or damage absorbing abilities.

There are advantages to the video game version of Sentinels of the Multiverse. For one, you can play it by yourself, so you do not need to have friends together. The other is that the math is handled automatically. While the gameplay of the board game is relatively snappy, there is definitely some math involved during some of the more complicated attack cards and redirect abilities. As someone who played the game on the PC first, I had a bit of a leg up on those playing the board game with me. Because the rules and mechanics are all the same, I felt right at home, but the others who played all picked it up quite easily.

The system is logical, so that is certainly helpful. However the colorful directions are clear and full of examples that make the learning curve a bit gentler. I also appreciated the section that showed how complex a hero or villain can be to play. One of our table opted for a very complicated character right off of the bat, and she did struggle to pick up on things a bit more during the game's earlier rounds. However, by the time we were finished, she was our primary source of damage dealing and she was having a blast with the character.

That is not to say that the game is easy by any means. Winning feels difficult, which makes victory all the sweeter when it does occur. It was great that our first game came down to the wire. One of our party was beaten, two of us were on the ropes and one was left with solid health but no cards left in his hands. One more turn, and we probably would have lost the game - two or three tops because one player is generally not going to prove a match for the villains. That being said, on the last player's turn in that round, we managed to do just enough damage to secure victory and win the game. It was a victory by the narrowest of margins and we immediately set up and played another match - which we eventually lost.

The comic book theme for Sentinels of the Multiverse is spot-on as well. Sure, the characters have parallels to popular figures from other comics we all grew up with, from a girl with lots of Batman-like gadgets to a character who deals ice damage and a physically powerful superhero who falls into a leadership role with ease. That makes them comfortable, familiar and easy to relate to - but there is enough flavor text on the cards themselves, great artwork and entertaining combinations to try out that the heroes found in Sentinels of the Multiverse come to stand on their own feet easily enough.

This is where the board game comes out ahead of the PC one for me. The gameplay with friends makes the victories and defeats far more memorable than the standalone experience does. We were living out and creating our own stories, and they felt right at home with the comic themes found within. The quality of the parts, the well-written directions and intelligent game design mean that expansions make sense and we cannot wait to try them out ourselves and expand on what has easily become one of our favorite board games to date.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Verified Purchase
I've been wanting a superhero deck builder for some time now, and researched carefully before making a purchase. After reading numerous reviews of this game I purchased it. My thoughts?

A steep cost of entry

This game sat on my shelf never played for a VERY long time (since December 13, 2013), despite being the game I wanted to play more than any other game I owned. I pulled it out, read the rules, and tried to play it with my wife. An hour later we gave up and I was very confused. I lent it to a friend hoping to have him figure it out and then explain it to me. He was never able to explain it to me but said it was now one of his favorite games. Okay, so it is definitely a game worth playing, but I still don't know how to play it. I read the rules again. Still couldn't figure it out. I watched video reviews. No good, they talk about the game but don't explain how to play it. Some more time went by. I saw an expansion for sale on the cheap and bought it (Sentinels of The Multiverse: Vengeance). Every week I still promised that this weekend I would figure the game out. And every weekend I could not. Fast forward to Yesterday....

A Breakthrough

I sat down with a friend and forced the poor guy to play this game with me despite the fact that he wasn't really interested. I slogged through the rules and setup AGAIN and got the game underway. At first, my friend had a look on his face like like he was both bored and irritated, and several times I thought he was going to make me give up and end the game. I was repeatedly confused by rules and procedures, but I was DETERMINED to get through the game and we battled on. And then, a funny thing happened....we started to have fun!

A Glorious Mess of a Game

If you have never played this game before, you need to understand something right now. This game is LOADED with stats that have to CONSTANTLY be adjusted. You will have cards that increase/decrease damage you deal, decrease/increase damage you take, status ailments, etc, etc. And then you will constantly be negating those same effects, discarding them, and destroying cards of all kinds left and right. This leads to massive confusion early on if you aren't ready, because most games spell out for you how to deal with conflicts of cards (how much damage does a villain take if his minions lower the damage he takes but i played a multi-target damage weapon that killed his minions?). This game explains NOTHING like that. Heck, it doesn't even explain what to do with the dividers or tokens. Use them or don't, the game designers could care less!

The strange genius to this (which should have been made REALLY clear in the rules) is that you are supposed to FIGURE IT OUT YOURSELF!!!! If you activate a power that shields you from damage but don't take any damage this turn, is it still in effect next turn? I said yes and that's how we played. We also attacked minions FIRST with multi-target attacks so that the villain wouldn't get their bonuses! Is this the RIGHT way to play? I have no idea and honestly I don't think there IS a right way to play.

Likewise, there were times we accidentally played an environment card twice, or didn't account for damage that should or should not have been taken. Did we backtrack? Sometimes yes, others no. The important thing is to keep moving forward and don't over-think it. This game shines when you keep things going.

"Did you just sucker-punch a dinosaur???? He just sucker-punched a dinosaur!!!!"

The real fun with this game comes when you let the extremely strong and fun flavor of the game shine. Watching minions get killed by the environment (dinosaurs ate his minions!), redirecting attacks at the villain ("Did you just LAVA-BEND???"), and playing ridiculous attacks at random environment monsters was absolutely hilarious and incredibly fun. Even though me and my friend lost this game (and he's unsure about whether he really likes it or not) I am in love with this game right now. Because this game lets you be characters like Batman, Superman, The Flash, etc, and in all the best ways. The art is wonderful, the cards are hilarious, the gameplay is incredibly fun, and the replay value is near infinite.

Words of caution:

Again, this is an absolutely fantastic game that every comic fan should play. Just remember (especially the first few games) that the important thing is to keep moving forward and quickly resolve disputes (I suggest electing a game-master/team leader before starting play). When in doubt, do what you want. There's absolutely NOTHING in the manual about how to use the tokens, so put them next to a character to keep track of it's health, and put status indicators next to characters for the same reason. Read and re-read all cards in play to remind yourself of modifiers. If you're confused about what you are supposed to do in a conflict have your game-master/leader make a decision that sorta makes sense, and get on with the villain trouncing!

As for me, after FINALLY figuring out how to play, this just might be one of my new favorite games.

*Update 2/2/15*

After finding something in Advanced Rules about having someone play as more than one character in a two player game, I began to suspect that my friend and I were decimated because the game is unbalanced if you have only two players with one character each. Sure enough, after looking it up on the Internet I found that the game is indeed BROKEN if you only play with two characters. Yet another example of something that should have been very clear in the instructions and was not. If you choose to play this game with fewer than 3 people, be aware that at least one of them must play two characters or the game becomes unbalanced.

*Update 2/10/15*

A search of the Internet resulted in my finding a 49 PAGE list of rules and clarifications created by fans of the game using responses from the game's creators on forum posts (complete with similar font, color, and illustrations). I HIGHLY recommend locating a copy and printing it out double-sided. It GREATLY clarifies the game rules, and makes the game far more enjoyable. It's pretty ridiculous when fans of a game write better instructions than the creators of said game.
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