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Separation of Church & State: What the Founders Meant Paperback – May 8, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1932225419 ISBN-10: 1932225412 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: WallBuilder Press; 1st edition (May 8, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932225412
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932225419
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.3 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (160 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #24,908 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Barton is the founder of WallBuilders, an organization dedicated to presenting America's forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on our moral, religious, and constitutional heritage. David is author of numerous best-selling works and a national award-winning historian who brings a fresh perspective to history.

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More About the Author

David Barton is the founder of WallBuilders, an organization dedicated to presenting America's forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on our moral, religious, and constitutional heritage. David is author of numerous best-selling works and a national award-winning historian who brings a fresh perspective to history.

Customer Reviews

It takes only a few minutes to read this little 20 page book.
jmc
Very interesting information, most of which I have already read in greater detail in other books.
Jason Rasmussen
This book references the original letter that Jefferson wrote about church and state.
Kevin Sweeney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

115 of 162 people found the following review helpful By HermanHusband on September 20, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
*** Please read note FIRST at the bottom of this review ***

I am a big fan of David Barton's work. I think it is obvious for anyone who has read American history honestly (and is not on the ACLU's payroll) that Barton is correct about God's central role in America's founding, and foundation. However (and maybe I am not seeing something correctly) but, Separation of Church & State p.6 has three quotes that Mr. Barton uses that do not seem to match the official "Journal of the Senate" records from the same date referenced in his book for September 3, 1789.

Example #1: Mr. Barton's quote: "Congress shall not make any law establishing any religious denomination." The Journal of the Senate's first version of the amendment states that Congress should not support any "one religious sect or society in preference to others."

Example #2 Mr. Barton's quote: "Congress shall make no law establishing any particular denomination." The Journal of the Senate states" Congress shall not make any law infringing the rights conscience, or establishing any religious sect or society."

It doesn't change his very valid points, but it is very important to me (especially considering what's at stake) that original sources are quoted accurately. If I am wrong in my amateur research please show me I will immediately apologize and change this post. I have included the link to The Journal of the Senate date in question. [...]

*** PLEASE NOTE *** after two years someone was able to show that Mr. Barton was indeed correct in using the quotes he did in this book. Barton's research WAS NOT "off" as I first asserted. I am sorry that I made this mistake, it was an honest one.
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Format: Paperback
I recently hosted 33 individuals into my home last Sunday afternoon, July 20, 2014. I gave a verbal presentation of what that great 'Historian', Dave Barton's research had given to us in his pamphlet, "Separation of Church and State: What the Founders Meant" and the copies of letters that the signers of our Constitution had written to each other. Dave Barton makes it very clear that in 1947, the Supreme Court used only eight words of the letter that President Thomas Jefferson had written to the Danbury Baptists of Connecticut. The Supreme Court said that Jefferson gave the Supreme Court the authority to have the State (the Supreme Court) prohibit the Church (or individuals) from expressing their Biblical beliefs in the Schools, Courthouse or National Parks --
Their statement was exactly the opposite of what Jefferson had said in his full letter. Jefferson had said that our First Amendment gave Churches and individuals the Freedom of Expression of Religion and that the State (the Government) would NEVER prohibit
that Freedom of Expression because the Constitution has created a SEPARATION of Church and State. Always before 1947, the Supreme Court had printed the full letter from Jefferson to the Danbury, Connecticut Baptists so one could easily ascertain what Jefferson had meant when he said, Churches and individuals had the FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION.

On that date, July 20, 2014, 33 individuals signed up to purchase this very pamphlet so that they could memorize and tell their friends and neighbors what our great historian, Dave Barton had researched and found to be TRUE.

All of us must understand the deception of the Supreme Court in the year of 1947.
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8 of 14 people found the following review helpful By M. Botello on March 7, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an easy book to understand. Dave Barton does a good job presenting evidence that supports the idea that the Founders did not intent that the Federal government should be antagonistic or in outright opposition to religion. Rather, our Federal government should be supportive and neutral when it interacts with it. However, is any interaction with religion or its representatives, it appears (based on the evidence presented) that although the Federal government should not and must not establish a National church, it does have an obligation to ensure that it is encouraged and not hindered in any way.
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Julianne Haines on November 24, 2013
Format: Paperback
Among the many controversial issues in America, one in particular has been discussed and reviewed since this nation was founded. That issue can be defined with the phrase, separation of church and state. For years founding documents have been analyzed and strong opposing views have formed concerning the separation of church and state. As one formulates an opinion of his or her own, one should keep in mind what this phrase was created to mean and the roots it now has today. Modern’s view of separation of church and state prohibits the social benefits influenced by religion, discourages true morality, and distorts the founders intent found in the constitution.
The founding fathers clearly understood the benefit in religion influencing society and wanted to preserve these freedoms. Society is affected by the values it upholds and encourages. One example of how religious influences are excluded in America’s public that in turn causes harmful social habits is sexual relations. After court ruling in the 1960s against public relious influences, teen pregnancies rose above 700%, sexually transmitted diseases increased, and sexual activity in general expanded. (Barton) Proposals were created to teach abstinence in schools yet were shut down due to the arguments that teaching abstinence relates to religion and is contrary to separation of church and state. Instead, schools teach kids to have safe sex. Basically giving young maturing adults the freedom to choose what they do sexually. However, few or none of the consequences are mentioned when discussing the freedoms of sex. Teen pregnancies do have an affect on society, even the economy. Eighty percent of teen mother have resulted to welfare and many end up in poverty.
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