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September Swoon: Richie Allen, the '64 Phillies, and Racial Integration (A Keystone Book ®) Library Binding – February 2, 2004


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Product Details

  • Series: A Keystone Book ®
  • Library Binding: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Penn State University Press (February 2, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0271023333
  • ISBN-13: 978-0271023335
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #607,031 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“This is a marvelous little book about a sliver of time in baseball’s history.”

—Derek Catsam, Virginia Quarterly Review



“I thoroughly liked his narrative and rate this book as an excellent read.”

—Richard Weigel, Daily News



“For its insights into Phillies’ history alone, this book belongs in the starting lineup.”

—D.E. Kern, Express-Times (Easton, PA)



“Drawing from an academic backgroud, Kashatus deserves praise for writing more than a baseball book.”

—D.E. Kern, Express-Times (Easton, PA)

About the Author

William C. Kashatus is a professional historian who earned a doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania. A regular contributor to the Philadelphia Daily News, he is author of several books, including Connie Mack's '29 Triumph: The Rise and Fall of the Philadelphia Athletics Dynasty (1999), Mike Schmidt: Philadelphia's Hall of Fame Third Baseman (2000), and Just Over the Line: Chester County and the Underground Railroad (2002).


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By John G. Dzwonczyk on July 8, 2004
Format: Library Binding
September Swoon, by William Kashatus has a vivid feel that hits home for me and probably would for anyone else who endured the historic end-of-season collapse that happened in what was later known in Philadelphia as "the year of the blue snow." Blue it was indeed for my then fifth grade psyche. I LOVED the Phillies. Johnny Callison was my hero and it seemed that 1964 was all going our way from the June 21st perfect game by Jim Bunning, to Callison's walk-off 3-run homer to end the All Star game to the six-game lead that the Phillies held in the NL before losing ten of their last twelve games. Just as true, though is the tragic career of Richie (later "Dick") Allen, the Phillies' Rookie of the Year third baseman. Race relations for me had little to do with baseball, the Phillies and every other team had always had colored players (at least to my awareness) and frankly, I hadn't given the matter any thought at all by that time. Like the author`s, my memories are of faithful listening to late night west coast games with a transistor radio under my pillow and the crackle of lightning-generated static cutting through the play by play of By Saam, Rich Ashburn and Bill Campbell.
But it is undeniable that Richie Allen came to be a figure inescapably linked to the racial boil-over that was occurring nationwide throughout the sixties. Intelligent and articulate, Allen later admitted to having been thrust reluctantly at first, into the role of baseball's poster child for black belligerence. The Philadelphia baseball franchise was notorious for its lily-whiteness until 1957, when it hired its first black player. These facts were unknown to a ten year old, but Kashatus artfully weaves the race scene that erupted into riots together with the baseball collapse that the Phillies suffered.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By R. Timmermann on November 7, 2004
Format: Library Binding
I thought this book was going to be just a day-by-day recap of the 1964 Phillies famous skid at the end of the season to give the NL pennant to the Cardinals, but it was much more.

Kasthaus does a good job of capturing the racial tensions of the time and he does give the Phillies management of the time a chance to respond to allegations of racism within the organization.

Ultimately, it is a book more about the relationship of Dick Allen with the city of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia press. Stan Hochman, who receives some severe criticism in the book, is not well-portrayed in this book, nor is Larry Merchant. However, neither man is interviewed for the book as Kasthaus states that no Philadelphia writer of the era returned his phone calls except for Allen Lewis.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By P. J Kulkosky on August 9, 2004
Format: Library Binding
This archivally-bound, well-written book is a professional

historian's account of the season of the 1964 Phillies. It is

well illustrated with portraits of the major players in this

story. In 1964, I made a bet with my brother: that Richie Allen

would some day be considered as great as Mickey Mantle. We still

argue the comparison, but thanks to this book, I better appreciate

the reasons I may not have won the bet- yet. The book

ends with a well reasoned plea for Allen's admission to the Hall

of Fame, an appropriate move once "character" is taken fully into account.

This book will be enjoyed by baseball fans, students of the history of integration,

and the general reader, as insightful, well researched, and a

meaningful contribution to American social history.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Frederick Young on November 20, 2012
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
Just what I ordered. My Uncle, John Ogden, who was a scout for the Phillies at the time, signed Richie Alan in 1960 along with his two brothers. Richie had nothing but praise for my uncle, pages 46 and 47. It's funny I've lived in Ellwood City, PA for a number of years, which is close to Wumpum, PA, where Richie was born, went to school, and played Baseball. Richie Allen was a natural all around athlete and stared in both Basketball and Baseball.

I didn't know of Richie at that time as I lived in Wyoming and went to high school and college there. In 1860 I was only in the eigth grade of school.

I'm enjoying the book!
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6 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Alphonse Dattolo on February 28, 2004
Format: Library Binding
I HAVE BEEN A PHILLIES FAN FOR 44 YEARS AND THE BIGGEST DISAPPOINTMENT WAS WHEN THEY LOST THE 1964 PENNANT.THEY HAD A 6.5 GAME LEAD WITH 12 GAMES LEFT AND PROMPTLY LOST 10 IN A ROW!!!!!!! I HAD TO WAIT UNTIL 1980 FOR MY DREAM TO BE REALIZED.READ THIS BOOK ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE A PHILLIES FAN!!!!!!!
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