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Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels.
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Sergeant Stubby: How a Stray Dog and His Best Friend Helped Win World War I and Stole the Heart of a Nation Hardcover – May 13, 2014

4.2 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Is the appeal of this book greater for dog lovers or military-history buffs? It’s a toss-up, because the book’s charm simply radiates off the page in all directions. Stubby was a genial terrier of uncertain breeding who began hanging around the Yale University training grounds of the 102d Infantry Regiment, soon to be shipped off to war (WWI, that is). Stubby’s particular pal was James Conroy, a 25-year-old volunteer. Conroy’s unit soon adopted Stubby as their pet. When it came time for deployment to Europe, Conroy smuggled Stubby onboard, and the pooch’s charm led to his acceptance by the unit’s higher-ups as an official mascot. Stubby stood by his men in the worst trench conditions, but Conroy remained his truest friend. Stubby became famous in Europe during the war, and his fame accompanied him back home at war’s end. Stubby remained with Conroy until the dog’s death in 1926, and this very engaging book serves as a tribute to canine courage and devotion. Another edition of this book is being published for middle graders (see p.48). --Brad Hooper

Review

"Is the appeal of this book greater for dog lovers or military-history buffs? It’s a toss-up, because the book’s charm simply radiates off the page in all directions." --Booklist
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: National Geographic (May 13, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1426213107
  • ISBN-13: 978-1426213106
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 0.9 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #394,805 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By brian d foy VINE VOICE on April 1, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Most of this book isn't about Sergeant Stubby since his exploits with the Yankee Division are poorly documented, if at all. The first two-thirds of the book are more about the general history of World War I, the Yankee Division, and Sergeant Stubby's keeper, Corporal Conroy. If you already know the basic story of Stubby, you're likely to be disappointed that there's not much more to learn about his time in France. Some of the text reference photos, but those aren't part of the book.

The last third of the book is more about Stubby since Conroy was able to keep a scrapbook with his postwar activities. I found this part less compelling since it was the stories of his celebrity rather than his heroism.

Rin Tin Tin, Fanny the Goat, and Cher Ami, other famous World War I animals, make appearances.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is the second time in four years I've discovered a new book based upon information I read first in a children's book published in the late 1950s, so it amused me a bit to see this book publicized as the "first time" Stubby's story is being told. Sergeant Stubby, a stray Boston terrier (or possibly Boston mix) who wandered out onto an Army training field in 1917, became the mascot of the 102nd Infantry and accompanied "the doughboys" to Europe. While in service, he was gassed and also physically injured in an attack. Stubby's story (and also the story of Snowman the jumping horse told in THE EIGHTY DOLLAR CHAMPION) was told in Patrick Lawson's MORE THAN COURAGE, published by Whitman Books.

Much of Bausum's story of Stubby and his "handler," Robert Conroy, and their experiences in World War I is that of conjecture, as Conroy kept no diary. However, after the war, when Stubby was welcomed home to as much acclaim as the men he served with, Conroy did keep a scrapbook, and much of that information is happily firsthand. Bausum does a super job of describing Stubby's and Conroy's world in the 'teens: the pre-war U.S., the world of the training camps and the trenches, the endless mud and disease and the very real terror of being killed or maimed, the horror of gas. There is also discussion of just what breed of dog Stubby was, as he has been described at various times as a pit bull, a bull terrier, or some other bully breed.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and all able-bodied men from age 21 yo 30 had to register for public service. A certain 25 year old James Robert Conroy from Connecticut volunteered and was sent to Yale to train. Enter Stubby--a bull terrier mix who liked to hang around the Yale athletic fields, begging for scraps and watching the men train. He attached himself to Conroy and there lies the rest of the story--a soldier and his dog. They were inseparable. Conroy served in the Headquarters Company of the 102nd Infantry Regiment of the Yankee Division. When the Division was called overseas, Conroy did not want to leave Stubby and the dog certainly did not want to be left behind either. He was smuggled aboard the ship and landed in France. Even when he was discovered, Conroy's superiors did not send him home--Conroy had taught the dog to "salute"! His superiors were charmed and the dog stayed. He became the regimental mascot and was loved by all the men. He became quite adapt at becoming a "war dog". He could smell the mustard gas and could warn the men. He lived in the trenches with the men. He even had his own gas mask! Stubby was wounded in battle and sent to recover with the injured troops. The dog became quite the hero. He returned home with his master, Robert Conroy and the two traveled around, telling of Stubby's adventures on the front lines. He heroics became quite an inspiration to those even long after the war was over. When Stubby died in 1926, Conroy had him preserved and he rests in the Smithsonian today!

Ann Bausum, an award winning author, has written many books for children, and came across Stubby's story by accident while researching a picture of a dog during World War I.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I'm a big fan of pit bulls - we had two growing up, and a couple of years ago I became the owner of an unwanted rescue pit from the pound. As one who is dismayed by the current aura of hysteria surrounding the breed, I'm glad to see fine books like "Sergeant Stubby" coming out that extol the virtues of this misunderstood type of dog.

Stubby, a friendly stray pit of dubious heritage, is adopted by the members of a National Guard outfit preparing for combat in WWI. Pvt. James Conroy soon becomes his primary guardian, and he trains Stubby to function within the unit as a mascot (Stubby even leans to smartly salute with his right paw). Eventually they wind up in Europe, where both Stubby and Pvt. Conroy see combat, are wounded in action, and become media darlings.

Stubby and Conroy both survive the Great War none the worse for wear, and after returning home they build upon their wartime fame by becoming involved in various veteran activities. Through it all, Stubby's winning personality charms all who meet him (including three US Presidents), and he becomes a sort of ambassador for his fellow troops. Indeed, he was somewhat of a nascent role model for the later K-9 Corps, as well as service dogs in general.

"Sergeant Stubby" is an easy and enlightening read. Although author Ann Bausum admits that she often had to speculate about Stubby's activities due to the dearth of documentation, there was more than enough evidence to demonstrate Stubby's devotion to his master and service to his unit, both during and after the war. In addition, Ms.
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