Qty:1
  • List Price: $31.50
  • Save: $3.31 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Setting Down the Sacred P... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: First printing. Near fine in a near fine DJ.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Setting Down the Sacred Past: African-American Race Histories Hardcover – May 30, 2010


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$28.19
$23.19 $8.85

Putting Modernism Together by Daniel Albright
Putting Modernism Together by Daniel Albright
In Putting Modernism Together, the author argues human culture can best be understood as a growth-pattern or ramifying of artistic, intellectual, and political action. Going beyond merely explaining how the artists in these genres achieved their peculiar effects, he presents challenging new analyses of telling craft details which help students and scholars come to know more fully this bold age of aesthetic extremism. Learn more | See similar books
$28.19 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Setting Down the Sacred Past: African-American Race Histories + Parish Boundaries: The Catholic Encounter with Race in the Twentieth-Century Urban North (Historical Studies of Urban America) + Mississippi Praying: Southern White Evangelicals and the Civil Rights Movement, 1945-1975
Price for all three: $113.19

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Situated somewhere on the continuum of slave narratives and the later works on race identity of Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. DuBois and others is a collection of lesser-known works, “communal narratives” that attempt to reconcile race and religion in America. Scholar Maffly-Kipp draws on lectures, sermons, plays, poetry, and other works of several little-known writers from the American Revolution and WWI that reflect on how the black community in the U.S. has attempted to record and analyze the meaning of the African diasporic experience. She explores the works of free blacks during slavery as they attempted to write their own histories and examine their circumstances as distinct and similar to that of slaves. Among those she examines: Lorenzo Dow Blackson, a self-educated African American Methodist preacher; Jacob Oson, a teacher at an African American school in New Haven, Connecticut, in the 1800s; and George Washington Williams, who in the late 1800s attempted to write the history of the “African race.” These writers add valuable perspective to the works of better-known black authors and a full perspective on African American history. --Vanessa Bush

Review

A seminal work that is destined to become a classic in the field… it is the kind of work that people will be reading… thirty years from now. (Paul Harvey, author of Freedom's Coming: Religious Culture and the Shaping of the South, from the Civil War through the Civil Rights Era)

This remarkable piece of historical writing allows us to eavesdrop on discussions of fundamental importance to African Americans through the course of the long nineteenth century about the nature of blackness, about divine destiny in history, about the emotional and historical connections between Africa and black America, and about the past as a guide to the future. (Jon Sensbach, author of Rebecca's Revival: Creating Black Christianity in the Atlantic World)

Laurie Maffly-Kipp's work reveals the rich theological imaginations of vernacular religious thinkers who offered their readers bold histories of the world and religious interpretations of African American peoplehood. A major contribution to the field of African American religious history. (Judith Weisenfeld, Princeton University)

A challenging analysis of how African Americans understood themselves, challenging because it alters so much of what we take for granted. A deeply human book. (David Hall, Harvard University)

Maffly-Kipp traces, with great care and originality, the development of African-American collective history and memory from the Revolution into the early twentieth century. She offers a profound reflection on how historical consciousness is formed. (Leigh E. Schmidt, Harvard University)

Maffly-Kipp draws on lectures, sermons, plays, poetry, and other works of several little-known writers from the American Revolution and WWI that reflect on how the black community in the U.S. has attempted to record and analyze the meaning of the African diasporic experience. She explores the works of free blacks during slavery as they attempted to write their own histories and examine their circumstances as distinct and similar to that of slaves. Among those she examines: Lorenzo Dow Blackson, a self-educated African American Methodist preacher; Jacob Oson, a teacher at an African American school in New Haven, Connecticut, in the 1800s; and George Washington Williams, who in the late 1800s attempted to write the history of the African race. These writers add valuable perspective to the works of better-known black authors and a full perspective on African American history. (Vanessa Bush Booklist 2010-04-01)

Maffly-Kipp resists simpler analyses that would cast these race histories in unapologetic "heroic" mode or cram them all into the model of "liberatory" texts or (going the opposite direction) decry their tendency to follow European and Protestant models of historical narrative. Instead, she gives a rich and satisfying account of texts in which "race" was only a partial unifier...[An] impressive feat of intellectual history and literary recovery. (Paul Harvey Books & Culture 2010-07-01)
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Belknap Press; 1 edition (April 30, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674050797
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674050792
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,542,395 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Professor of Religious Studies Laurie F. Maffly-Kipp explores how African Americans in the 18th and 19th century used the Bible to understand their own history. The first Rastas were the inheritors of a rich religious tradition.
This book is not about Rastafarian culture, nor is it about Jamaica. The only remote reference is a short passage about Marcus Garvey at the end. Around 1920, the rise of Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) did not only receive scorn and revulsion among white Americans but also with black intellectuals like W.E.B. Du Bois, who looked upon the ceremonial attire of Garvey and his religious followers with high levels of disdain. Their colourful processions and accompanying music were even compared to comic opera's. "But Garvey knew better than the power of the narrative that linked African Americans to a ceremonial lineage", writes Maffly-Kipp.
With 'ceremonial lineage ' she means the gradual mixing of African oral traditions with biblical stories that were passed onto slaves in America, especially in the church. Once a week this holy sanctuary provided a place where they were left alone by their masters. Here they were free to sing and dance, yell and scream, reason and listen to the teachings of the pastor. The main Afro-American religious communities at that time were the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) and the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church (Amez), who in imitation of the white churches also built a network of organizations including publishing houses, schools, support programs for the poor ...
It was there, during those uplifting services, the pastors told their followers about a great African civilization, about black pharaohs in ancient Egypt and the deliverance of the children of Israel.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Laurie Maffly-Kipp's work Setting Down the Sacred Past uncovered collective narratives crafted by African-Americans throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in America. While varying in content, these narratives typically looked back into history and forward into the future in order to construct meaning for the present. They explored sites outside of the imperfect reality that African-Americans faced and employed themes of race, nationality, and religion. Numerous genres relayed these stories that provided hope in the midst of a dark reality.

In the midst of these narratives' great diversity, Maffly-Kipp argued that the bedrock holding them together was Protestant Christianity. The latter helped African-Americans establish shared ancestry to all peoples through the bible's creation account. Biblical and church history concerning Egypt and Ethiopia connected them to a story larger than the "historyless" one they inherited in America. The doctrine of providence assured them that God was working all things for their good even when this was difficult for them to comprehend. The freedom from sin and slavery that they experienced compelled them to a future vision that included sharing their blessings with people in Haiti and Africa. Past, present, and future all depended upon the faith they received.

One of Maffly-Kipp's greatest strengths - the ability to trace these narratives with precise historical detail - proved to be the book's greatest weakness. Details such as birth dates, birth locations, hometowns, and organizations joined added depth and background to the storytellers profiled. However, I consistently found myself skipping over much of this material and still comprehending the larger points Maffly-Kipp sought to make. A culling of details, or perhaps a few of the numerous anecdotes, would make this book much more clear and captivating.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Setting Down the Sacred Past: African-American Race Histories
This item: Setting Down the Sacred Past: African-American Race Histories
Price: $28.19
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com